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Ingredient In Yellow Curry Can Reduce Heart Enlargement And May Prevent Heart Failure
Science Daily ^ | 2-22-2008 | University Health Network

Posted on 02/22/2008 11:19:18 AM PST by blam

Ingredient In Yellow Curry Can Reduce Heart Enlargement And May Prevent Heart Failure

Turmeric. Eating curcumin, a natural ingredient in the spice turmeric, may dramatically reduce the chance of developing heart failure. (Credit: iStockphoto/Nilesh Bhange)

ScienceDaily (Feb. 22, 2008) — Eating curcumin, a natural ingredient in the spice turmeric, may dramatically reduce the chance of developing heart failure, researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre of the Toronto General Hospital have discovered.

In a study entitled, “Curcumin prevents and reverses murine cardiac hypertrophy,” published in the February edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers found when the herb is given orally to a variety of mouse models with enlarged hearts (hypertrophy), it can prevent and reverse hypertrophy, restore heart function and reduce scar formation.

The healing properties of turmeric have been well known in eastern cultures for some time. The herb has been used in traditional Indian and Chinese medicine to reduce scar formation. For example, when there is a cut or a bruise, the home remedy is to reach for turmeric powder because it can help to heal without leaving a bad scar.

Unlike most natural compounds whose effects are minimal, curcumin works directly in the cell nucleus by preventing abnormal unraveling of the chromosome under stress, and preventing excessive abnormal protein production.

“Curcumin’s ability to shut off one of the major switches right at the chromosome source where the enlargement and scarring genes are being turned on is impressive,” says Dr. Peter Liu, cardiologist in the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and Scientific Director at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research – Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health. However Dr. Liu cautions that moderation is important, “the beneficial effects of curcumin are not strengthened by eating more of it.”

Dr. Liu, who holds the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s Polo Chair Professor in Medicine and Physiology at the University of Toronto, says that since curcumin is a naturally occurring compound that is readily available at a low cost, it might be a safe and effective means of preventing heart failure in the future.

“Whether you are young or old; male or female; the larger your heart is, the higher your risk is for developing heart attacks or heart failure in the future. However, until clinical trials are done, we don’t recommend patients to take curcumin routinely. You are better off to take action today by lowering blood pressure, reducing cholesterol, exercising and healthy eating,” says Dr. Liu.

If clinical trials of curcumin support initial findings of heart enlargement prevention, it may offer hope for millions of patients with heart enlargement in a relatively safe and inexpensive manner. Curcumin-based treatments are currently in clinical trials for pancreatic and colorectal cancer patients with promising results.

This study was funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Adapted from materials provided by University Health Network, via Newswise.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: curcumin; curry; elargement; heart; india; turmeric; yellow
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To: jwalburg

That is definitely an American recipe. The East Indians use spices tailored for the other ingredients. They do not use “curry powder”. When in Australia a fellow engineer, who was Indian, made curried chicken. He started with a layer of mustard seed in peanut oil, in a pan, which he popped, then added the chicken, tomatoes, and other spices, which were all freshly ground.


51 posted on 02/22/2008 4:45:48 PM PST by Ed Condon (Wanted, newer tag line in good condition.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

I love Pad Thai but I’ve never heard of it made with bees. Thai food has a lot of curry dishes and they love to include peanuts...yummy! I grew up with a bottle of nuc mam on the table. That’s what happens when both of your parents spend years in SE Asia. My Dad went kind of native in VN as he was there as an advisor in ‘62 and didn’t come back for good until about ‘69 or ‘70. If you ever get to StLouis give me a holler and I’ll show you the best places(most of them, we’ll be the only “round eyes”).


52 posted on 02/22/2008 4:52:35 PM PST by Uriah_lost (This space closed for a respectful mourning period...)
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To: blam

53 posted on 02/22/2008 4:52:48 PM PST by Flashman_at_the_charge (There's no 'F' in 'Conservative GOP Candidates'.)
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To: blam

Many prepared mustards also have turmeric, including the very popular French’s classic yellow mustard.


54 posted on 02/22/2008 5:02:58 PM PST by snowsislander
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To: diamond6
What are the benefits of grape extract, resveratrol?

Do a search at lef.org for each. More info there than I can possibly remember. Their articles usually cite and provide the journal publication abstracts. So you can also check a summary by the actual researchers in addition of lay summaries.

55 posted on 02/22/2008 5:16:12 PM PST by ModelBreaker
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To: ModelBreaker
The same is true for the grape extract, resveratrol.

Are grape seed extract capsules effective?

56 posted on 02/22/2008 5:20:09 PM PST by Conservativegreatgrandma
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To: Uriah_lost
There was a great Thai restaurant in Des Moines, IA about ten years ago. Diners who could consume the "angry dish" received a wallet card certifying them as fire eaters.
The dish was a veggy curry item called Kang Puk. As the owner, Pak, was often heard to say, "when you eat Kang Puk, you have Kang Puk gut!"
57 posted on 02/22/2008 5:48:39 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (ENERGY CRISIS made in Washington D. C.)
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To: Oldhunk

How much do you take daily? Capsules?


58 posted on 02/22/2008 6:02:46 PM PST by LucyJo
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To: Conservativegreatgrandma
Are grape seed extract capsules effective?

I think that depends on who makes it and what you are talking about. There's a lot of bad (doesn't contain any useful materials) or even dangerous supplements (some Chinese derived supplements contain dangerous stuff) out there. And there's no evidence that a lot of the stuff out there is absorbed by humans.

I've been a customer of lef.org for many years. They are a non-profit who, in addition to marketing supplements, funds a lot of research into supplements and has a whole testing wing which is widely regarded as one of the finest testing laboratories in the world. They test what they buy before they resell it.

That said, human trials on resveratrol and grape seed extract suggest they do a bunch of really good stuff, including changing the gene expression of older people in the same manner as does deliberate undernutrition. (Deliberate undernitrition being the only established way to extend lifespan in higher animals). I would suggest searching for both at lef.org.

While you are there, also check out SOD, COQ10, D-Ribose, curcumin, pomegranate, blueberry, and green tea. There are very impressive human studies on every one of them reported there, with access to the abstracts.

59 posted on 02/22/2008 6:07:52 PM PST by ModelBreaker
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To: LucyJo

I take one capsule a day called turmeric curcumin from Puritans Pride. It has 400 mg of turmeric and 50 mg of turmeric extract. I also take chondroiton and glucosomine. I found that the combination works best for me. I started with the latter two and did not get much relief until I added the turmeric. But when I took turmeric only, it did not seem to be as effective. I have never tried prescription drugs for relief.


60 posted on 02/22/2008 6:36:46 PM PST by Oldhunk
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To: blam

Whoohooo I’m saved.. I love Indian food :)


61 posted on 02/22/2008 6:37:51 PM PST by eXe (Si vis pacem, para bellum)
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To: TigersEye

Thanks, but I don’t have access to any of that. Funny, though, my favorite vegetable is the stalk of the burdock plant - called “cardoni” or “cardones”.

It is also known as “artichoke stalk” because it tastes just like artichokes without all the hassle.

This rash is something systemic and doesn’t really respond to anything topical - except that I finally went to a doc who prescribed a hydrocortisone ointment a little stronger than the OTC product I had been using.

All it does is make it stop itching, but at least that relief makes it eventually go away for a while. I have too many other health concerns to tend to than that, except when it’s raging and seems to block everything else out!


62 posted on 02/22/2008 9:53:05 PM PST by Rte66
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To: swmobuffalo

I’m just starting to pay attention to low-sodium things because of just now finding I have high BP.

First thing I checked was W’shire sauce and it’s not nearly as bad as I thought it would be - I really do use small amounts and was exaggerating about drinking it, lol. Just meant that I really like it on a lot of things.

I did buy low-so soy sauce, tho.


63 posted on 02/22/2008 9:56:50 PM PST by Rte66
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To: Rte66
I think you could find the tincture of Burdock (Arctium minus or Arctium lappa) in an herb store or a health foods store. I meant it for internal use. It would probably be alcohol based although some tinctures are preserved with glycerin. If you could get the fresh root that would be eaten also.

I didn't know that Burdock stem was a good edible. I should have since the root is although you can't always say that if one part of a plant is edible all of it will be. Artichokes are so good I would love that. I have eaten raw peeled thistle stems and they are very good and artichoke is a genus of thistle also.

Burdock root is a little earthy tasting but I found it adds a nice flavor to a stir fry with all the other flavors in it. I just diced the root into water chestnut-like slices. A little goes a long way.

64 posted on 02/22/2008 10:22:59 PM PST by TigersEye (This is the age of the death of reason.)
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To: Marysecretary

I bought my turmeric by the pound at Ta Lin Market in Albuquerque, an Asian market, actually they carry a lot of different nationalities products now. It is from India, very high quality and 100 times cheaper than buying bottles of capsules. A lot cheaper than a small bottle in the spice aisle of the ordinary grocery too.


65 posted on 02/22/2008 10:30:46 PM PST by TigersEye (This is the age of the death of reason.)
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To: ModelBreaker

I see the next poster says they get their supplements from Puritan’s Pride. I do as well. I once read reviews that claimed that PP’s supplements contain the amount stated.


66 posted on 02/23/2008 5:09:29 AM PST by Conservativegreatgrandma
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To: Oldhunk

Thanks for the info.

My mother passed along some information about someone who had begun taking turmeric about six months ago, or so, and noticed after a couple of months that it really helped her arthritis although she had begun taking it for another reason at the suggestion of her doctor.

I’m not certain what else she takes, or in what dosage, so I’m glad to know what is helping you.

I bought a bottle of Rexall Turmeric 450mg with the 50mg of turmeric extract,and began taking one each morning a couple of weeks ago.

Mother thought the person told her that she is taking one capsule in the morning and one in the evening, but I didn’t want to do that without checking it out, since the recommended dosage on the bottle is one daily.

I have been taking 2400mg of fish oil daily for quite a while. It is supposed to help against inflammation as well.


67 posted on 02/23/2008 8:08:06 AM PST by LucyJo
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To: Oldhunk

I checked out interactions at Drug Digest, and this came up...says the interaction is minor in severity, but thought you might like to know the info.

http://www.drugdigest.org/DD/Interaction/ChooseDrugs/1,4109,,00.html

GLUCOSAMINE may interact with TURMERIC

Both glucosamine and turmeric contain chemicals that may reduce the blood’s ability to form clots. When taken together, they can increase the risk of dangerous bleeding. Individuals who take both may need more frequent blood tests to make sure that blood is clotting properly. In addition, both glucosamine and turmeric contain substances that may lower blood sugar levels. If they are used together, blood sugar levels may become too low and symptoms such as shakiness, sweating, confusion, and distorted speech, may result. In general, glucosamine and turmeric should not be taken at the same time. If they are used together and bleeding is uncontrolled or blood sugar levels become too low, either glucosamine or turmeric or both may need to be stopped. You may want to ask your healthcare provider about this potential interaction if you think you are having problems.

This interaction is well-documented and is considered minor in severity.

Last Updated: September 2005


GLUCOSAMINE may interact with CHONDROITIN

Both glucosamine and chondroitin contain chemicals that may reduce the blood’s ability to form clots. When taken together, they can increase the risk of dangerous bleeding. In general, glucosamine and chondroitin should not be taken together. Individuals who take both may need more frequent blood tests to make sure that blood is clotting properly. Those who experience problems may need to stop taking glucosamine, chondroitin, or both. You may want to ask your healthcare provider about this potential interaction if you think you are having problems.

This interaction is well-documented and is considered minor in severity.

Last Updated: September 2005


CHONDROITIN may interact with TURMERIC

Both chondroitin and turmeric contain chemicals that may reduce the blood’s ability to form clots. When taken together, they can increase the risk of dangerous bleeding. In general, chondroitin and turmeric should not be taken together. If you take both, however, your doctor should be informed. You may need frequent blood tests to make sure that your blood is clotting properly. If you experience problems, you may need to stop taking chondroitin, turmeric, or both. You may want to ask your healthcare provider about this potential interaction if you think you are having problems.

This interaction is poorly documented and is considered minor in severity.

Last Updated: May 2005


68 posted on 02/23/2008 8:21:28 AM PST by LucyJo
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To: LucyJo

Thanks so much for that information. I was not aware of these interactions. I will have to rethink my approach to the problem.


69 posted on 02/23/2008 9:30:07 AM PST by Oldhunk
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To: Oldhunk

You’re welcome.

Drug Digest is a pretty good site. I usually check there, or somewhere, before beginning to take anything because of prescription medication that I do have to take.


70 posted on 02/23/2008 9:40:08 AM PST by LucyJo
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To: blam

thanks, bfl


71 posted on 02/27/2008 9:39:23 PM PST by neverdem (I have to hope for a brokered GOP Convention. It can't get any worse.)
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To: blam; Judith Anne

My wife is an expert at Indian cooking but, as you know, it makes sense to purchase the 95% standardized extract curcuminoid capsules for the medicinal benefit. Judith Anne uses them as well.


72 posted on 02/27/2008 9:55:06 PM PST by steve86 (Acerbic by nature, not nurture™)
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To: LucyJo

The anti-coagulant effect is NOT minor.


73 posted on 02/27/2008 9:56:20 PM PST by steve86 (Acerbic by nature, not nurture™)
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To: LucyJo
noticed after a couple of months that it really helped her arthritis

Must be rheumatoid.

74 posted on 02/27/2008 9:58:28 PM PST by steve86 (Acerbic by nature, not nurture™)
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To: steve86

Curcumin Helps Rheumatoid Arthritis

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is an Indian spice that has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for inflammatory problems. Curcumin, the yellow pigment derived from turmeric is known to have anti-inflammatory, antitumor and antioxidant effects. Now for the first time, research reports that curcumin can help prevent rheumatoid arthritis.

The study, published in Arthritis and Rheumatism, investigated curcumin’s effects using an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Researchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine and the Arizona Center for Phytomedicine Research isolated a whole extract of turmeric root, the essential oils contained in turmeric, and an oil-depleted extract containing curcuminoids. They injected the preparations into female rats with streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis.

The researchers found that the cucuminoid preparation significantly inhibited joint inflammation and destruction. Further analysis revealed that the cucuminoid preparation inhibited the activation of nuclear factor kappa-beta (NF-KB). NF-KB produces inflammatory proteins that destroy joint tissue, such as in rheumatoid arthritis. This result suggests that turmeric has a similar mechanism of action as some arthritis drugs.

“These translational studies demonstrate in vivo efficacy and identify a mechanism of action for a well-characterized turmeric extract that supports further clinical evaluation of turmeric dietary supplements in the treatment of RA,” the study authors write.

REFERENCES:
1. Funk JL et al. Efficacy and mechanism of action of turmeric supplements in the treatment of experimental arthritis. Arthritis Rheum 2006 Nov;54(11):3452-64.


75 posted on 02/27/2008 10:02:54 PM PST by steve86 (Acerbic by nature, not nurture™)
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To: Uriah_lost

I love that hot peanut sauce. Use it like ketchup!

Scrambled eggs, soups, toss it on a fresh green salad with a bit of olive oil and parmesan....

now i’m hungry!


76 posted on 02/27/2008 10:03:42 PM PST by djf (I think McCain deserves a chance. After all, he is on R side!)
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To: blam

I was just talking with a friend about curry tonight. How about that?

No wonder I like it so much!


77 posted on 02/27/2008 10:09:03 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Rte66
I had a eczema for years and a friend told me about this, it is an RX. LUXIQ foam.
Got some and it worked within a few days.
Might want to read about it, it sure worked great.
After applying the foam, you use cetaphil cream over the area, twice a day. That is the instructions I got.

Hope it works on your rash, if you try it.
http://www.luxiq.com/WebPages/patLuxiq.html

78 posted on 02/28/2008 6:21:57 AM PST by sweetiepiezer
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To: gitmogrunt

I put it in my homemade soup. It gives a wonderful flavor as well as a rich golden color.


79 posted on 02/28/2008 6:25:01 AM PST by rimtop56
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

I had acid reflux a few years ago, but I followed my sister’s advice and got rid of it. (My sister and I are into natural health remedies.) She said to take 1,000 mg of Vitamin C and 1,000 mg of a goldenseal/echinacea capsule in the morning and at night for three weeks. It worked. Just food for thought.


80 posted on 02/28/2008 6:28:11 AM PST by rimtop56
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To: Rte66

As I’m sure you realize, the best treatment for the rash depends upon its cause, which you don’t know yet. Here are two possibilities.

Your body needs sulfur and Vitamin C to make healthy skin; you might be low in sulfur. You might try MSM, which is food-grade sulfur. You can buy an MSM combo at the health food store. Taking it without Vitamin C will not help. Plus, the combos capsules include other ingredients that should help your body absorb it better.

Another thing to try is to do gall bladder cleanses and kidney cleanses. The theory is that if your kidney is compromised, it is unable to detox whatever toxins you have in your body, so your body tries to expel the toxins through the skin.

Best wishes in finding the correct diagnosis for your problem.


81 posted on 02/28/2008 6:43:43 AM PST by rimtop56
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To: rimtop56; sweetiepiezer

Thanks to you both for your info. I keep a file of things I might try in the future.

I suspect it’s something like a chicken pox/herpes virus thing - I’ve never had that *other kind* of herpes, mind you! - just because of the way it recurs. It came back two days ago when I got stressed out over something, after it had been dormant or non-existent for months.

What’s odd, to me, is that it always comes back in a new place where it hadn’t broken out before - and I’m talking about teeny-tiny spots here. If I could have “mapped” them, the new ones are always in-between where older spots were.

I’m only talking about a very small area on my hands, but when it’s bad, I can’t use them at all for anything productive - especially cooking and preparing meals or personal care stuff. I’m trying mind over matter this time and just putting HC on it and then ignoring it, if possible. The more I mess with it, it gets worse.

Thanks again - I have your posts copied into my file!


82 posted on 02/28/2008 8:02:31 AM PST by Rte66
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