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Start Writing the Eulogies for Print Encyclopedias
New York Times ^ | March 16, 2008 | NOAM COHEN

Posted on 03/16/2008 11:13:04 AM PDT by SamAdams76

IT has never been easier to read up on a favorite topic, whether it’s an obscure philosophy, a tiny insect or an overexposed pop star. Just don’t count on being able to thumb through the printed pages of an encyclopedia to do it.

A series of announcements from publishers across the globe in the last few weeks suggests that the long migration to the Internet has picked up pace, and that ahead of other books, magazines and even newspapers, the classic multivolume encyclopedia is well on its way to becoming the first casualty in the end of print...

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: encyclopedias; informationage; internet; trends
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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Even though this is an article from the New York Slimes, I encourage you all to click through and read the whole thing as, well, the print edition of the New York Slimes itself may be one of the next casualties of the Internet Age and we will have to find other material to house-train our puppies with.

But back to the printed encyclopedias. I am old enough to remember when the encyclopedia was pretty much the only reference material you had when you needed to do a school paper on something or wanted to find out more about a given subject.

Don't laugh, but I used to be deeply in love with the printed encyclopedia when I was a kid. I'm not exaggerating either. Everytime I saw one of those Britannica salespeople come up to the door, the breath would literally be knocked out of me and after the salesman left the house, I would get down on my knees and unsuccessfully beg my parents to buy the entire set.

For while I had plenty of editions of other encyclopedias lying around the house (such as the Encyclopedia Americana and the World Book Encyclopedia) that my mother picked up at flea markets or at yard sales, the Britannica represented the Holy Grail of Encyclopedias.

The only "new" encyclopedias I had as a child was one of those cheap "Grolier" editions that was featured at one of my local supermarkets back in the mid-1970s as part of a promotion. Each week, the supermarket had a different volume that you could buy for something like $5 (if you bought at least $30 in groceries) so that after about 20 weeks or so, you ended up with the whole set. Guess where I made my family do their grocery shopping during those 20 weeks? But I was pretty disappointed in the quality of the set and learned that in this world, you get what you pay for.

Does anybody remember the movie "Christmas Story" with that kid and his stupid BB gun? Well that was like me only with the Britannica. Only unlike that spoiled brat in the movies, I never got my childhood wish realized because my parents were working poor and the Britannica set was always priced out of their means. I might as well have begged them to buy a Rolls-Royce for all the good that begging did me.

So I had to content myself with visiting one of my childhood friends who had a full set (albeit about 15 years old) in his house. I used to make excuses to go over to his house just so I could sit in his parlor, pull a volume off the bookshelf at random, and spend hours browsing the articles inside while gently stroking the creamy leather binding.

Needless to say, my friend thought I was pretty weird and soon dumped me but his mother thought I was a little angel and told me I could come back and visit anytime which I did until one night when she and I were alone in the house and she started massaging my back.

Well enough about my warped childhood, I eventually grew into a man and when I got old enough to make a little money and get my own apartment, the Encyclopedia Britannica was one of my first "adult" purchases. And I'm not kidding, when the full set was delivered to me, it was one of the top 10 days of my life. I actually took the day off from work to accept delivery and I had already purchased a pretty expensive bookcase from the local furniture store to house them in.

It was a spanking new 29-volume 1986 edition and it set me back about $695 (which was a small fortune for me back then) but as soon as I neatly arranged the set on the new bookcase and settled into my easy chair with Volume I (A-Be) with a tumbler of fine scotch, I felt like I was Winston Churchill or something. I felt that I had finally made it as part of the "moneyed" and privileged class.

I spent many hours back in those pre-Internet and pre-marriage days browsing those encyclopedias and gaining what I believed to be immense amounts of knowledge on virtually every subject imaginable.

Then the Internet came along and changed everything. Now all you have to do is "google" a given subject, no matter how arcane, and you can spend the next 20 years reading all about it.

So about six years ago, my wife finally convinced me that I ought to get rid of the Britannica set and I gave it to a family member who almost immediately sold it at a yard sale. Which pissed me off royally. But that's a story for another day.

1 posted on 03/16/2008 11:13:07 AM PDT by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

Wow Sam, I thought that I was the only encyclopedia nut. I was the same way as a teenager back in the ‘60s. I even had the grocery store set too.


2 posted on 03/16/2008 11:16:04 AM PDT by Inyo-Mono (If you don't want people to get your goat, don't tell them where it's tied.)
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To: SamAdams76
Burglar or encyclopedia salesman?
3 posted on 03/16/2008 11:18:57 AM PDT by P.O.E. (Thank God for every morning.)
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To: SamAdams76
I remember as a kid doing reports for school looking up stuff at home in our encyclopedia. Go to the public or school library and getting stacks of encyclopedias to research things.

What took me hours and hours then, I can find in a matter of minutes or seconds now.

Google is my friend.

Now I spend hours and hours reading things online. Is there life outside FreeRepublic???

4 posted on 03/16/2008 11:18:58 AM PDT by mountn man (The pleasure you get from life, is equal to the attitude you put into it.)
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To: SamAdams76

I grew up with an old set of Encyclopedia Americana to thumb through when I was bored. I know I went through every volume page by page reading much of the encyclopedia. Although I always wanted an Encyclopedia Britannica back then, I would gladly pick up an Oxford English Dictionary full set instead if I had the money and space!


5 posted on 03/16/2008 11:22:32 AM PDT by vladimir998 (Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ. St. Jerome)
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To: SamAdams76

I, too, will miss the printed encyclopedia.


6 posted on 03/16/2008 11:23:05 AM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Barack Hussein Obama: THE WRIGHT STUFF)
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To: SamAdams76

P. J. O’Rourke said a while back that he keeps a 1911 edition of Encyclopedia Britannica and that it is the only reference he really trusts (because it is free of political correctness...)


7 posted on 03/16/2008 11:25:18 AM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ("Wise men don't need to debate; men who need to debate are not wise." -- Tao Te Ching)
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To: SamAdams76

The most money I’ve ever made was selling encyclopedias door to door, I hated the life style of me and my employees but I loved that many children would discover magic in those books.

Encyclopedias had changed my life as a child, and no matter how bad I felt in selling the expense to the parents, I knew that in the end there was a long range positive to the work.


8 posted on 03/16/2008 11:36:14 AM PDT by ansel12 (Ronald W. Reagan and William F. Buckley Jr., both were U.S. Army veterans.)
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To: ansel12

Interesting. If you don’t mind me asking, what was it about the “lifestyle” of selling encyclopedias that you hated?


9 posted on 03/16/2008 11:38:35 AM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 44 days away from outliving Dan Quisenberry)
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To: SamAdams76

When I was 7 my parents ordered a set of World Book Encyclopedias, mainly for my sister and me.

I spent countless hours reading through them. I would usually just pick a volume by letter at random, then spend a few hours reading it from cover to cover.

I learned a lot and enjoyed it, too.

Too bad for the demise of the print encyclopedia. They were good to have around.


10 posted on 03/16/2008 11:40:09 AM PDT by Skooz (Any nation that would elect Hillary Clinton as its president has forfeited its right to exist.)
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To: SamAdams76

I’ve got the encyclopedia Britannica at home. It’s from 1989 and of course, much of the contents are very outdated. I have for the last 10 years contemplated discarding the set, but I keep thinking about all the times my kids used it for school research, and when even myself and my wife wanted to understand some subjects a bit better.

Now, with the internet and even some internet encyclopedias, the subject matter is very up to date and a lot easier to find material. But, that printed set is so beautiful and so nostalgic, that I still can’t bring myself to trash it. Perhaps in another 5 years. But, by then the set may be a classic and I may change my mind again.


11 posted on 03/16/2008 11:42:28 AM PDT by adorno
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To: SamAdams76
It is nice knowing that there are some other encyclopedia lovers out there. I too have fond memories of the Encyclopedia man bringing a new volume to our house each month. I have always loved reading them. Despite the Internet with its vast resources accessible to be read on one's computer monitor screen, there is nothing like being able to sit down on a comfortable couch or chair with a volume in one's hands and just read on a multitude of subjects for the pure pleasure of learning.
12 posted on 03/16/2008 11:43:47 AM PDT by Nevadan (nevadan)
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To: adorno
re: I’ve got the encyclopedia Britannica at home. It’s from 1989 and of course, much of the contents are very outdated.

Actually, the majority of information in a 1989 set of encyclopedias is still accurate. Sure, there have been some technological and medical advances as well as some historical changes, but the overwhelming body of knowledge known to humanity has not changed in the past 9 year.

13 posted on 03/16/2008 11:48:47 AM PDT by Nevadan (nevadan)
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To: Nevadan

don’t you mean the past 19 years?


14 posted on 03/16/2008 11:51:24 AM PDT by Borges
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To: adorno
If I could do it over again, I never would have given up my print set, even though it is now over 20 years out of date and still has a lengthy article on the "Soviet Union" and probably no article at all on the "Internet."

I was recently going through stacks of books in my attic and I stumbled upon a print copy of Jack London's "Call Of The Wild" which I had since I was a boy. It still has my underlines and side notes from the spring of 1973 when I was doing a book report on it in 5th grade. So even though full texts for "Call Of The Wild" are available on the Web for free (evidently the copyrights have expired and it is in public domain), the book has sentimental value that exceeds whatever I could get for it on eBay.

15 posted on 03/16/2008 11:54:21 AM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 44 days away from outliving Dan Quisenberry)
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To: Borges

Yes. Thanks!


16 posted on 03/16/2008 11:54:33 AM PDT by Nevadan (nevadan)
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To: SamAdams76

My mother has the 1910 Britannica from her father - leather bindings cracked and volumes falling apart but I love that thing. If you ever want to write of times a century past, you can see there how people saw the world, their science, engineering, social protocols, white man’s burden.


17 posted on 03/16/2008 11:57:16 AM PDT by heartwood
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To: Jeff Chandler

Older versions should be held onto - and scanned! Where else will we get non-PC edited versions of historical articles?


18 posted on 03/16/2008 11:57:22 AM PDT by tbw2 ("Sirat: Through the Fires of Hell" by Tamara Wilhite - on amazon.com)
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To: SamAdams76
I used to make excuses to go over to his house just so I could sit in his parlor, pull a volume off the bookshelf at random, and spend hours browsing the articles inside while gently stroking the creamy leather binding.

Whoa, TMI!

All kidding aside, we were a World Book family. I remember some uppity friend of mine seeing our encyclopedias and making some snide remark about the Britannica's being better.

Sadly, I trashed our World Book encyclopedias after my fathers passing because I just saw them as taking up space. Wish I hadn't done it now.

Good day to you.

19 posted on 03/16/2008 11:59:37 AM PDT by Looking4Truth (sinkmeister wanks in sink while steamroller gets the hardcore freak action, who's your daddy bill?)
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To: adorno

I remember back around 1980 on that game show Tic-Tac-Dough, A Navy pilot on leave in California was on the show and couldn’t lose. He eventually got his leave extended, rented a warehouse for his “million dollars worth of cash and prizes” and six new cars. Wink Martindale asked him what he attributed to his vast knowledge (they ran out of things to talk about long before that) and he said when he was a kid, his mother bought him a new Encylopedia Britannica and he spent all his time on the toilet reading it.


20 posted on 03/16/2008 12:00:18 PM PDT by BerryDingle (I know how to deal with communists, I still wear their scars on my back from Hollywood-Ronald Reagon)
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To: Inyo-Mono
FWIW, I tried to sell, then give away, an 1887 and a 1966 set of the Britannica. The former was, of course, leather bound, etc..

It was impossible to get rid of them.

Libraries and used bookstores had no interest in them. EBay was glutted with them.

I finally threw them in a dumpster at work. A shame, but there was no more room for them here.

21 posted on 03/16/2008 12:01:33 PM PDT by Gorzaloon
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To: ansel12

I bought the deluxe set from a salesman outside the PX at Schofield Barracks, HI, in 1988. He was pretty happy, but a few weeks later the mail room folks were not amused. I also got the complete and un-expurgated 100 volume set “Great Books Of All Time, Which You Will Probably Never Read”.

The World Book had a nice set, it is amazing to see how prevalent propaganda and so-called political correctness has rotted thoroughly into modern tomes. The set I have dates from 1966.

I also find indispensible, a 30s era Merriam-Websters dictionary.


22 posted on 03/16/2008 12:04:58 PM PDT by Freedom4US
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To: Mr. Jeeves
P. J. O’Rourke said a while back that he keeps a 1911 edition of Encyclopedia Britannica and that it is the only reference he really trusts (because it is free of political correctness...)

I still have my grandparent's 1936 edition for the same reason.
23 posted on 03/16/2008 12:06:11 PM PDT by BikerJoe
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To: SamAdams76
My wife has a small collection of encyclopedias from the ‘20’s and up. Great reference to see how Politically Correct the current ones are.
24 posted on 03/16/2008 12:11:03 PM PDT by Mark was here (The earth is bipolar.)
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To: Mr. Jeeves

Exactly, look at how the reasons for the Civil War have changed, for instance.


25 posted on 03/16/2008 12:12:59 PM PDT by Mark was here (The earth is bipolar.)
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To: vladimir998

Britannica (especially the old 9th Edition) is terrific and the OED is incomparable. We, fortunately, have the shelf space!

One thing nice about the actual tomes is finding other stuff whilst toddling about for something ....


26 posted on 03/16/2008 12:13:53 PM PDT by dodger
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To: SamAdams76

“Interesting. If you don’t mind me asking, what was it about the “lifestyle” of selling encyclopedias that you hated?”


Door to door sales was for the ‘green berets’ of the sales world, we could chew up the lesser mortals like car salesman etc.

The work was very tough so the lives of the sales people consisted of ego stroking of already big egos, except for three hours a night that we would slam it to the ‘fish’.

My crews consisted almost entirely of 19 and 20 year old girls and every one of them thought that they were the hottest thing on the planet.

The life style was one that could be described as the next best thing to being a rock star, while it appealed to a certain part of me the way decadence and high living do, it was causing terrible conflict with my inner codes.

I was good enough that I could pick out the house by driving past it and reading the signs, then go play pool for awhile, go back to the house give them a precise 55 minute pitch (never shorten it, never let it go longer), close them and then start picking up my crew.

To prove a point sometimes I would place 3 sets in one evening and I found a couple of girls that could do that.

In our case we never actually “sold” books, we placed them in people’s homes in return for a letter of endorsement and “advance” payment of “updating” services.

It bothered me that I had a psychic ability to see who was going to buy, by my initial look into their eyes and the total decadence of the female attentions were troubling as well, I even hired a guy for the purpose of serving as a screen to divert the girls (it wasn’t me, it was my role that they responded to).

It was taxing to hire a hundred people knowing that in two or three days 95 of them would be gone, and that after two weeks one of them would still be there.

It was taxing to give the “blue horizon” interview, where you switch the new hire from the advertised high salary to commission, it was also bizarre to have a girl that was bringing in a huge amount of sales, want to stay on a salary.

The bottom line is that it was discomforting for me to be prostituting my natural desire and ability to engage people by exploiting it to make money.


27 posted on 03/16/2008 12:14:45 PM PDT by ansel12 (Ronald W. Reagan and William F. Buckley Jr., both were U.S. Army veterans.)
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To: Mark was here
A good litmus test for political correctness is to look up articles on subjects like Karl Marx, the Roman Empire or Indians.

Hint: If you have to read about American Indians in the "Native American" subject, chances are your encyclopedia is tainted with political correctness.

28 posted on 03/16/2008 12:18:19 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 44 days away from outliving Dan Quisenberry)
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To: vladimir998
My parents bought a set of EB when I was born (1946). Don't know what they didn't wait. They got the annual year book renewals for about 7 years and stopped. I just went to the library. Now, who needs it. With the speed of things encyclopedias can easily get out of date.
29 posted on 03/16/2008 12:20:47 PM PDT by purpleraine
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To: Freedom4US

“I bought the deluxe set from a salesman outside the PX at Schofield Barracks, HI, in 1988”


LOL, I remember letting the salesmen into my home outside of FT. Lewis, Wa. in 72-73.

I never could figure out how they went from giving me a set of encyclopedias for free to several hundred dollars of payments, then a few years later I was giving the same pitch.


30 posted on 03/16/2008 12:22:51 PM PDT by ansel12 (Ronald W. Reagan and William F. Buckley Jr., both were U.S. Army veterans.)
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To: SamAdams76
I worked for Funk & Wagnalls in the early to middle 1990s. By 1995, the "eulogy" had already pretty much been written.

That was still before widespread use of the World Wide Web, but at that time, every PC manufacturer (Gateway, Packard Bell -- remember those?) was including a free encyclopedia on CD with a computer purchase.

31 posted on 03/16/2008 12:31:37 PM PDT by NewJerseyJoe (Rat mantra: "Facts are meaningless! You can use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!")
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To: SamAdams76
The 1911 Britannica is available online at several sites. As other editions get out of copyright they'll probably be put on the Internet as well.

It isn't the same, though. There was something about actually having a volume in your hand, that the online versions don't quite provide.

My parents' old Britannica wasn't that colorful or up-to-date -- we used the World Book for school -- but on those things it covered best, like British History, Britannica went a lot deeper than Wikipedia and possibly provided more information more compactly than you could probably come up with in several Internet searches.

32 posted on 03/16/2008 12:46:38 PM PDT by x
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To: dodger

You wrote:

“One thing nice about the actual tomes is finding other stuff whilst toddling about for something ....”

That’s exactly why I won’t buy the OED on CD-Rom. Amazon.com may have come out with its Kindle, but I still would much rather hold a book in my hands and let my fingers wander through its pages!


33 posted on 03/16/2008 12:53:25 PM PDT by vladimir998 (Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ. St. Jerome)
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To: NewJerseyJoe
That was still before widespread use of the World Wide Web, but at that time, every PC manufacturer (Gateway, Packard Bell -- remember those?) was including a free encyclopedia on CD with a computer purchase.

Yes, I remember those days well. I sure wish I could have back all the money I spent on dopey "content" software back in the mid-1990s. Those were still the early days of the Internet where everybody had dial-up on slow 9600 or 14.4kbps connections and it wasn't cheap either. So it seemed a good investment to get encyclopedias and stuff like that on compact disc because you couldn't ever imagine instantly downloading images, sound and video over the web at lightning speed.

I bought programs like Microsoft Encarta, Microsoft Music, Microsoft Cinema (where they had movie reviews and short clips of movies) and even 100 years worth of National Geographic magazines.

Loading them up today, they look so primitive and cheesy that I kick myself for spending $100 a pop on them. Especially now that you can pull up virtually every music video and movie clip on YouTube in a matter of seconds. I remember spending good money for programs like Microsoft Encarta,

34 posted on 03/16/2008 12:53:55 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 44 days away from outliving Dan Quisenberry)
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To: vladimir998
Wikipedia has a nice feature called "random article" that used to foster some useful browsing. But now that feature is utterly useless because the good articles are lost in the millions of arcane articles that are now on there such as articles on some councilman from Plano, Texas or some obscure teenybopper song or some tiny town in Germany.

Wikipedia ought to come up with a way to filter that stuff out in the "random article" feature.

35 posted on 03/16/2008 12:58:25 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 44 days away from outliving Dan Quisenberry)
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To: SamAdams76
sigh

I had a wonderful set of encyclopedias. Hubby threw them all away because he said I knew everything.

My 14 yo LIVES in books, and dictionaries. She's reading at college level.

36 posted on 03/16/2008 1:03:01 PM PDT by mommadooo3 (Old concept in justice. If the law won't take care of it, it's just us.)
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To: SamAdams76

Too funny! After reading your story and the comments, I don’t feel like such a booknerd anymore! Parents bought EB when I was born—64. By the time I could read well, at about 5-6, I found them and thought I’d died and gone to Heaven! Did I mention that I hate, no loathe, Dick and Jane?

Alas, a few years later, I found out that I knew a lot more about a lot of subjects than my beloved EB, but I still liked to just pick one up and browse.

I have, and treasure, my grandma’s 1951 Webster’s New World Dictionary, encyclopedic edition. As far as I know, all the EB’s are gone. Daddy got internet.:)

We used to have another set, gray with red writing on the covers. Stories and fairy tales. I spent many a day reading those. Anybody remember what they were?


37 posted on 03/16/2008 1:07:19 PM PDT by gardengirl
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To: mommadooo3

You wrote:

“My 14 yo LIVES in books, and dictionaries. She’s reading at college level.”

Good for her! I wish all teenagers were that interested in books...and I don’t mean Harry Potter either.


38 posted on 03/16/2008 1:08:25 PM PDT by vladimir998 (Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ. St. Jerome)
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To: mommadooo3

Good for your 14 YO. I still do!

Someone came in the garden center where I work yest and asked for Encyclopedia. The other girl that works there replied—she’s in the greenhouse.

A young guy that works with us looked at my colleague and said—if she’s Encyclopedia, you must be a Little Golden Book!


39 posted on 03/16/2008 1:11:17 PM PDT by gardengirl
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To: Skooz

Hold on to your older written encyclopedia especially if they were written before the advent of political correctness.You will be able to show your grandchildren what OBJECTIVE history was all about.


40 posted on 03/16/2008 1:18:06 PM PDT by ardara
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To: ansel12
Good stuff. There were days when several door-to-door salespeople would come around every day back in the 1970s. Not just encyclopedias, but vacuum cleaners, magazine subscriptions, vinyl siding, driveway sealing, etc.

Now the only people that seem to come around are Jehovah's Witnesses!

I suppose that as an encyclopedia saleman, you'd want to focus on houses that had bicycles or swing sets in the yard, and then make initial contact before the husband got home from work (and let the wife sell the husband for you).

I remember how the salespeople really pushed on subscribing to the "updated" volumes that would come out annually after the initial set was bought so I guess that must be how they make most of their commissions?

41 posted on 03/16/2008 1:18:46 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 44 days away from outliving Dan Quisenberry)
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To: SamAdams76

Encyclopedias are good for looking up references that others may make, but they are historical and reading them is only for catch-up.


42 posted on 03/16/2008 1:21:08 PM PDT by RightWhale (Clam down! avoid ataque de nervosa)
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To: SamAdams76

“I suppose that as an encyclopedia saleman, you’d want to focus on houses that had bicycles or swing sets in the yard, and then make initial contact before the husband got home from work (and let the wife sell the husband for you). “


No, that would not work, it was a tightly controlled and orchestrated 55 minutes of positive persuasion of them as a couple, the deal had to be rock solid because in my era, the 3 day cancellation clause had entered the picture, which meant that a signature was no longer the end of the deal.

Some of the wildest characters I ever met were the old school guys that only needed a signature. I never met any of them that could succeed in the three day cancellation era, they were great showmen and con men, but their effect was temporary and the customers would cancel their contracts. (They all became professional motivators)

The ten years of updating services compressed into a 36 month payment schedule were simply the cost of the set of the entire purchase and commission (huge).

After all, ten years off updating services for what, the cost of a couple cups of coffee a day, a couple of quarters a day, just remember to send that letter in telling us how you use the books and I can place this set in your home for free.


43 posted on 03/16/2008 1:37:32 PM PDT by ansel12 (Ronald W. Reagan and William F. Buckley Jr., both were U.S. Army veterans.)
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To: SamAdams76
I bought programs like Microsoft Encarta, Microsoft Music, Microsoft Cinema (where they had movie reviews and short clips of movies) and even 100 years worth of National Geographic magazines.

LOL! I bought some of those too including the 100 years worth of Nat'l Geographic magazines. What a pain it was to look through those dics, but it did come in a nice looking wooden case.

44 posted on 03/16/2008 1:49:42 PM PDT by Inyo-Mono (If you don't want people to get your goat, don't tell them where it's tied.)
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To: ansel12
May I ask which company you worked for?
45 posted on 03/16/2008 1:57:25 PM PDT by Nevadan (nevadan)
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To: BerryDingle; SamAdams76
he spent all his time on the toilet reading it.

Otherwise known as the library.; ) It's harder to drag my laptop into the "library".

When I was young and we had a question about something, my dad would always say, "Let's look it up.", and we'd reach for the appropriate volume. (I remember being fascinated by the leaning tower of Pisa.) We also had a children's encyclopedia, Golden Book?, it had great maps of countries for school reports and I loved looking at the pictures of the scary looking deep-sea fish with the lights! When a World Book sales women came to the door I was ready to buy a set without conferring with my husband so as to offer the same opportunity to my daughters.

46 posted on 03/16/2008 2:05:33 PM PDT by stayathomemom
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To: NewJerseyJoe

You know what though? The CD versions were pretty lame, there is nothing to compare with the EB. Maybe they have improved in recent years.

The Internet has numerous webpages on any given subject, but still requires a working connection, hardware, etc. I would liken the modern internet akin to a GPS - handy, convenient, amazing, but I’m not leaving on a roadtrip without a road atlas, no way.


47 posted on 03/16/2008 2:06:24 PM PDT by Freedom4US
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To: ansel12
Okay, I think I get it now! So you would simply spend most of the 55-minutes showing them what a great encyclopedia the Britannica was (after all it sells itself) and towards the end of the presentation, mention that for the price of a couple of cups of coffee a day, they can have ten years of updates and oh, by the way, if you agree to that, I'll throw this entire set of encyclopedias in for free!

Hey, maybe if you came around my door back in the 1970s with that pitch, my parents might have gone for it!

48 posted on 03/16/2008 2:47:22 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 44 days away from outliving Dan Quisenberry)
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To: SamAdams76

I grew up on Britannica and Britannica Junior. We have both still and World Book too...a new edition! Funny, homeschoolers drool over my editions of Britannica. Considered the best.

Stop listening to the wife.


49 posted on 03/16/2008 3:38:04 PM PDT by Chickensoup (If it is not permitted, it is prohibited. Only the government can permit....)
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To: vladimir998

I, too, credit much of my success as a student to the Encyclopedia Americana.


50 posted on 03/16/2008 3:56:40 PM PDT by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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