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Just Say No to Purple Five-Dollar Bills
Poe.com ^ | April 2, 2008 | Richard Lawrence Poe

Posted on 04/02/2008 7:42:28 PM PDT by Richard Poe

click here to read article


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To: Richard Poe
OMG! I don't think I can stand it! This is the worst thing that could ever happen! I'm series! What ever shall we do!
151 posted on 04/03/2008 4:51:38 PM PDT by steveo (Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.)
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To: mamelukesabre

No I didn’t know that. A mind reader I am not.


152 posted on 04/03/2008 5:01:40 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: Momaw Nadon
How big are 1/50th oz gold coins?

Are we talking new dollars or old dollars, here?

153 posted on 04/03/2008 5:06:49 PM PDT by Jim Noble (I've got a home in Glory Land that outshines the sun)
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA
USFRIENDINVICTORIA writes: " This article, in today's The Economist indicates that changing the look of currency might actually affect its perceived value."

Thanks for the link. This is very important. I have posted the article below:

Look and Feel
The value of a coin or banknote depends on its familiarity
The Economist, April 3, 2008

IF RATIONALITY reigned supreme in economics, travellers would spend their foreign cash based upon its value in the currency of their home country. All too often, however, they actually treat foreign banknotes as though they were Monopoly money. Given the unfamiliarity of other countries' currencies that is not, perhaps, surprising. But a piece of research about to be published in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review by Adam Alter and Daniel Oppenheimer, a pair of psychologists at Princeton University, shows that something similar is true even of familiar currencies, depending on the form they come in. In particular, Dr Alter and Dr Oppenheimer have demonstrated that the perceived value of a dollar changes with the form that dollar takes.

For the first part of their study Dr Alter and Dr Oppenheimer picked 37 “volunteers” at random from the university's canteen. They asked them to estimate how many simple objects—gumballs, paperclips and pencils—they could purchase with either a standard dollar bill or a Susan B. Anthony dollar coin that was presented to them. Susan B. Anthony dollars are legal tender but, having been produced only from 1979-81 and then again in 1999, they are rarely seen in circulation.

After the volunteers had made their estimates, they were asked to indicate on a scale of one to seven how familiar they were with either the banknote or the coin. Dr Alter and Dr Oppenheimer were not surprised to find that all participants were less familiar with the coin than with the banknote. Nor were they that surprised to find a difference in how the participants valued coin and note (the expectation that there would be a difference was, after all, the point of doing the experiment). They were, however, flabbergasted by the size of the difference. People offered the banknote believed, on average, that they could use it to buy 83 paperclips, 72 napkins or 46 sweets. Those offered the coin thought 39 paperclips, 51 napkins or 27 sweets. In other words, the note was believed to be almost twice as valuable as the coin.

To check this result was not caused by some prejudice in favour of paper money and against coinage, Dr Alter and Dr Oppenheimer repeated the experiment offering either two single dollar bills or a single two-dollar bill. Like dollar coins, two-dollar bills are rarely found in circulation. The second set of results was virtually the same as the first. And when the study was conducted a third time with a real dollar bill and a subtly doctored version that had had, among other things, George Washington's head reversed, the results were, again, nearly the same. People, it seems, literally value familiarity.

Whether this observation has wider significance is unclear, but it may. Familiarity takes time to build up. It may have been unfamiliarity with the currency itself, rather than with its face value, which caused price gouging (or, at least, allegations of price gouging) when the euro was introduced. With that in mind, it might be wise for America's Federal Reserve to watch retail prices carefully when it introduces a new series of banknotes in August. With money, it seems, it is not familiarity, but unfamiliarity that breeds contempt.

-- from The Economist


154 posted on 04/03/2008 5:39:54 PM PDT by Richard Poe
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To: Richard Poe; null and void

omg, Nully, Richard Poe answered you. His own self! RP, will you answer me?? I’m afraid I’m star struck, I love your articles.
I didn’t know you posted here. I’m in awe. Now I’m going to have to go look up all your posts here.


155 posted on 04/03/2008 5:51:22 PM PDT by DeLaine (Michael Kelly RIP 1957-4/3/2003)
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To: DeLaine

Eat your heart out!

tee hee hee


156 posted on 04/03/2008 6:00:58 PM PDT by null and void (If you thought Congress was bad you ought to see what the folks who admit they are criminals can do)
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To: null and void

Hmmm ~ like IRS auditors?


157 posted on 04/03/2008 6:04:13 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

Them too.

Pretty much all of our ‘betters’ have that attitude to one degree or another.


158 posted on 04/03/2008 6:09:29 PM PDT by null and void (If you thought Congress was bad you ought to see what the folks who admit they are criminals can do)
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To: mamelukesabre
A can of pop.

Our overlords are working on banning or excessively taxing that as well.

159 posted on 04/03/2008 7:38:14 PM PDT by elkfersupper
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To: null and void

I feel like a lil kid. I had no idea RP posted here!


160 posted on 04/03/2008 7:59:54 PM PDT by DeLaine (Michael Kelly RIP 1957-4/3/2003)
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To: DeLaine
DeLaine writes: "I had no idea RP [Richard Poe] posted here. ... RP, will you answer me? ... I love your articles."

Yes, I post here. Indeed, it is one of my favorite pastimes.

Many thanks for your kind words about my articles!

161 posted on 04/04/2008 7:30:49 AM PDT by Richard Poe
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To: Richard Poe

Many thanks for your articles!


162 posted on 04/04/2008 9:34:54 AM PDT by DeLaine (Michael Kelly RIP 1957-4/3/2003)
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