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To: All
Sam Golubchuk update...

Killing ain't killing, if they shout it long and loud.

..............................................

Sam Golubchuk update... .......................................................................................

Some time in mid-September a Manitoba judge will make what is likely to be a life or death decision in the Samuel Golubchuk case.

Mr. Golubchuk is a frail, elderly man whose condition while in hospital deteriorated to the point doctors felt there was no hope of recovery. He was placed on life support last November and his family subsequently took the hospital to court when it sought to withdraw those measures.

Mr. Golubchuk's family was granted a temporary injunction last December preventing the hospital from removing him from artificial life support.

The case involving Mr. Golubchuk's care had originally been slated to begin in December however last week Court of Queens Bench Justice Marc Monnin agreed with an application by the Grace Hospital to move up the trial date. The Grace says caring for Mr. Golubchuk is taking a toll on staff and already one intensive care specialist has stopped working rotations at the hospital in protest.

At the heart of this matter is the type of emotional end-of-life decision faced by hundreds of Manitoba families every year. Have we done enough for our loved one? Should we let them go?

In order to ensure all reasonable attempts at treatment are considered, dying patients are often artificially kept alive when their own systems fail. As well as a duty of care it is also a kindness to families giving them a chance to prepare for what will likely happen when artificial supports are withdrawn. In a hospital situation, indefinite life support really isn't considered a long-term option. That type of care places tremendous demands on staff and resources and may well be unfair to others.

In December of 2007 Arthur Schafer director of the University of Manitoba ethics centre, was asked to comment on the case.

Appearing on Canada AM Schafer said "families must realize that with a shortage of hospital beds, one person's provision is another person's deprivation." Schafer also noted that while bodies can be kept alive through artificial means, "the person you are can't be kept alive... I don't think that's a sensible use of resources and I don't think that the hospitals can accommodate such wishes"

The Golubchuk family, not surprisingly disagrees.

On their Save Samuel Golubchuk web page his daughter Miriam states he is currently receiving "basic care" at the hospital which includes being given food and water and assistance in breathing through the use of a ventilator. She further says "rather than giving up the hospital is continuing to fight us for the right to kill our father."

The family has started a petition seeking to demand the hospital cease its case against them and "continue providing treatment for Sam according to their wishes and instructions."

Whether the removal of extraordinary artificial measures of life support constitutes "killing" someone is a matter of semantics and better left for the courts to decide. Make no mistake however; it's a decision sure to have wide reaching significance.

Most families, my own included have been or will be faced with this type of heart-wrenching decision.

Equating it with killing a loved one just seems wrong.

Ending Life Support isn't Killing

8mm

597 posted on 06/16/2008 5:51:30 AM PDT by 8mmMauser (Jezu ufam tobie...Jesus I trust in Thee)
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To: All; jy22077; floriduh voter
Ping to this thread by jy22077 on situations like that of Terri. Thanks, FV, for the ping.

Many families are faced with decisions about what to do when their loved ones suffer serious brain injury. When individuals are unlikely to come out of so-called "vegetative states," should we discontinue nourishing them by tube feeding? Is there anything wrong with causing patients in compromised states to die from starvation and dehydration under these circumstances? We all lived through such a decision when Terri Schiavo died in 2005 in Florida. Her death raised disturbing ethical questions that continue to reverberate in society today..........

The Modern Anathema Of Living With Brain Damage (About Terri Schiavo)

8mm

598 posted on 06/16/2008 6:08:08 AM PDT by 8mmMauser (Jezu ufam tobie...Jesus I trust in Thee)
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To: All; jy22077; floriduh voter
Ping to this thread by jy22077 on situations like that of Terri. Thanks, FV, for the ping.

Many families are faced with decisions about what to do when their loved ones suffer serious brain injury. When individuals are unlikely to come out of so-called "vegetative states," should we discontinue nourishing them by tube feeding? Is there anything wrong with causing patients in compromised states to die from starvation and dehydration under these circumstances? We all lived through such a decision when Terri Schiavo died in 2005 in Florida. Her death raised disturbing ethical questions that continue to reverberate in society today..........

The Modern Anathema Of Living With Brain Damage (About Terri Schiavo)

8mm

599 posted on 06/16/2008 6:09:10 AM PDT by 8mmMauser (Jezu ufam tobie...Jesus I trust in Thee)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 597 | View Replies ]

To: All; jy22077; floriduh voter
Ping to this thread by jy22077 on situations like that of Terri. Thanks, FV, for the ping.

Many families are faced with decisions about what to do when their loved ones suffer serious brain injury. When individuals are unlikely to come out of so-called "vegetative states," should we discontinue nourishing them by tube feeding? Is there anything wrong with causing patients in compromised states to die from starvation and dehydration under these circumstances? We all lived through such a decision when Terri Schiavo died in 2005 in Florida. Her death raised disturbing ethical questions that continue to reverberate in society today..........

The Modern Anathema Of Living With Brain Damage (About Terri Schiavo)

8mm

601 posted on 06/16/2008 6:19:23 AM PDT by 8mmMauser (Jezu ufam tobie...Jesus I trust in Thee)
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To: 8mmMauser; floriduh voter; BykrBayb; Lesforlife
Some time in mid-September a Manitoba judge will make what is likely to be a life or death decision in the Samuel Golubchuk case.

Is it just me or is there something inherently surreal about the fact that we live in a society where people seem to accept the premise that a judge should be allowed to decide if a person who has committed no crime should live or die?

Canada has not executed anyone in over 45 years and the abolished capital punishment primarily out of concern that an innocent person might be put to death. Yet now they seem to think that they have the moral and legal authority to execute a many who hasn't even been accused of a crime. It is disgusting.

604 posted on 06/16/2008 6:59:28 AM PDT by wagglebee ("A political party cannot be all things to all people." -- Ronald Reagan, 3/1/75)
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