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Medal of Honor Recipients, Normandy Invasion
MedalofHonor.com ^ | June 6, 2004

Posted on 06/06/2008 12:41:47 PM PDT by jazusamo

World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients - D-Day - June 6, 2004 The Normandy Invasion Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients - Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower instructs troops prior to invasion on D-Day.

Early in the morning of June 6, 1944, Americans heard on their radios that thousands of American and British soldiers had landed on the beaches of northern France. They were fighting German soldiers. This day marked the beginning of the end of one of the bloodiest wars ever: World War II. The American and British invasion of France was a top-secret mission called "Operation Overlord." When they landed on the beaches of Normandy on June 6, the goal of every soldier was to drive the German military back. Thousands of men died during that effort, either in the churning waves of the sea or by German gunfire. But enough soldiers struggled up onto the bluffs that, by nightfall, American and British forces had conquered a small area of Nazi-occupied France
 
 
Barrett, Carlton W.
BARRETT, CARLTON W.
Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Place and date: Near St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France, 6 June 1944. Entered service at: Albany, N.Y. Birth: Fulton, N.Y. G.O. No.: 78, 2 October 1944. Citation: For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, in the vicinity of St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France. On the morning of D-day Pvt. Barrett, landing in the face of extremely heavy enemy fire, was forced to wade ashore through neck-deep water. Disregarding the personal danger, he returned to the surf again and again to assist his floundering comrades and save them from drowning. Refusing to remain pinned down by the intense barrage of small-arms and mortar fire poured at the landing points, Pvt. Barrett, working with fierce determination, saved many lives by carrying casualties to an evacuation boat Iying offshore. In addition to his assigned mission as guide, he carried dispatches the length of the fire-swept beach; he assisted the wounded; he calmed the shocked; he arose as a leader in the stress of the occasion. His coolness and his dauntless daring courage while constantly risking his life during a period of many hours had an inestimable effect on his comrades and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army.
 
 
Butts, John E.
*BUTTS, JOHN E.
Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Co. E, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Place and date: Normandy, France, 14, 16, and 23 June 1944. Entered service at: Buffalo, N.Y. Birth: Medina, N.Y. G.O. No.: 58, 19 July 1945. Citation: Heroically led his platoon against the enemy in Normandy, France, on 14, 16, and 23 June 1944. Although painfully wounded on the 14th near Orglandes and again on the 16th while spearheading an attack to establish a bridgehead across the Douve River, he refused medical aid and remained with his platoon. A week later, near Flottemanville Hague, he led an assault on a tactically important and stubbornly defended hill studded with tanks, antitank guns, pillboxes, and machinegun emplacements, and protected by concentrated artillery and mortar fire. As the attack was launched, 2d Lt. Butts, at the head of his platoon, was critically wounded by German machinegun fire. Although weakened by his injuries, he rallied his men and directed 1 squad to make a flanking movement while he alone made a frontal assault to draw the hostile fire upon himself. Once more he was struck, but by grim determination and sheer courage continued to crawl ahead. When within 10 yards of his objective, he was killed by direct fire. By his superb courage, unflinching valor and inspiring actions, 2d Lt. Butts enabled his platoon to take a formidable strong point and contributed greatly to the success of his battalion's mission.
 

Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Charles N. Deglopper
*DEGLOPPER, CHARLES N.
Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Co. C, 325th Glider Infantry, 82d Airborne Division. Place and date: Merderet River at la Fiere, France, 9 June 1944. Entered service at: Grand Island, N.Y. Birth: Grand Island, N.Y. G.O. No.: 22, 28 February 1946. Citation: He was a member of Company C, 325th Glider Infantry, on 9 June 1944 advancing with the forward platoon to secure a bridgehead across the Merderet River at La Fiere, France. At dawn the platoon had penetrated an outer line of machineguns and riflemen, but in so doing had become cut off from the rest of the company. Vastly superior forces began a decimation of the stricken unit and put in motion a flanking maneuver which would have completely exposed the American platoon in a shallow roadside ditch where it had taken cover. Detecting this danger, Pfc. DeGlopper volunteered to support his comrades by fire from his automatic rifle while they attempted a withdrawal through a break in a hedgerow 40 yards to the rear. Scorning a concentration of enemy automatic weapons and rifle fire, he walked from the ditch onto the road in full view of the Germans, and sprayed the hostile positions with assault fire. He was wounded, but he continued firing. Struck again, he started to fall; and yet his grim determination and valiant fighting spirit could not be broken. Kneeling in the roadway, weakened by his grievous wounds, he leveled his heavy weapon against the enemy and fired burst after burst until killed outright. He was successful in drawing the enemy action away from his fellow soldiers, who continued the fight from a more advantageous position and established the first bridgehead over the Merderet. In the area where he made his intrepid stand his comrades later found the ground strewn with dead Germans and many machineguns and automatic weapons which he had knocked out of action. Pfc. DeGlopper's gallant sacrifice and unflinching heroism while facing unsurmountable odds were in great measure responsible for a highly important tactical victory in the Normandy Campaign.
 

World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Staff Sergeant Walter D. Ehlers, US Army 18th Infantry
EHLERS, WALTER D.
Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Place and dare: Near Goville, France, 9-10 June 1944. Entered service at: Manhattan, Kans. Birth: Junction City, Kans. G.O. No.: 91, 19 December 1944. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 9-10 June 1944, near Goville, France. S/Sgt. Ehlers, always acting as the spearhead of the attack, repeatedly led his men against heavily defended enemy strong points exposing himself to deadly hostile fire whenever the situation required heroic and courageous leadership. Without waiting for an order, S/Sgt. Ehlers, far ahead of his men, led his squad against a strongly defended enemy strong point, personally killing 4 of an enemy patrol who attacked him en route. Then crawling forward under withering machinegun fire, he pounced upon the guncrew and put it out of action. Turning his attention to 2 mortars protected by the crossfire of 2 machineguns, S/Sgt. Ehlers led his men through this hail of bullets to kill or put to flight the enemy of the mortar section, killing 3 men himself. After mopping up the mortar positions, he again advanced on a machinegun, his progress effectively covered by his squad. When he was almost on top of the gun he leaped to his feet and, although greatly outnumbered, he knocked out the position single-handed. The next day, having advanced deep into enemy territory, the platoon of which S/Sgt. Ehlers was a member, finding itself in an untenable position as the enemy brought increased mortar, machinegun, and small arms fire to bear on it, was ordered to withdraw. S/Sgt. Ehlers, after his squad had covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the platoon, stood up and by continuous fire at the semicircle of enemy placements, diverted the bulk of the heavy hostile fire on himself, thus permitting the members of his own squad to withdraw. At this point, though wounded himself, he carried his wounded automatic rifleman to safety and then returned fearlessly over the shell-swept field to retrieve the automatic rifle which he was unable to carry previously. After having his wound treated, he refused to be evacuated, and returned to lead his squad. The intrepid leadership, indomitable courage, and fearless aggressiveness displayed by S/Sgt. Ehlers in the face of overwhelming enemy forces serve as an inspiration to others.
 

World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Staff Sergeant Walter D. Ehlers, US Army 18th Infantry
*COLE, ROBERT G.
Rank and organization: Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army, 101st Airborne Division. Place and date: Near Carentan, France, 11 June 1944. Entered service at: San Antonio, Tex. Birth: Fort Sam Houston, Tex. G.O. No.: 79, 4 October 1944. Citation: For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty on 11 June 1944, in France. Lt. Col. Cole was personally leading his battalion in forcing the last 4 bridges on the road to Carentan when his entire unit was suddenly pinned to the ground by intense and withering enemy rifle, machinegun, mortar, and artillery fire placed upon them from well-prepared and heavily fortified positions within 150 yards of the foremost elements. After the devastating and unceasing enemy fire had for over 1 hour prevented any move and inflicted numerous casualties, Lt. Col. Cole, observing this almost hopeless situation, courageously issued orders to assault the enemy positions with fixed bayonets. With utter disregard for his own safety and completely ignoring the enemy fire, he rose to his feet in front of his battalion and with drawn pistol shouted to his men to follow him in the assault. Catching up a fallen man's rifle and bayonet, he charged on and led the remnants of his battalion across the bullet-swept open ground and into the enemy position. His heroic and valiant action in so inspiring his men resulted in the complete establishment of our bridgehead across the Douve River. The cool fearlessness, personal bravery, and outstanding leadership displayed by Lt. Col. Cole reflect great credit upon himself and are worthy of the highest praise in the military service.
 
 
Defranzo, Arthur F.
*DEFRANZO, ARTHUR F.
Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, 1st Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Vaubadon, France, 10 June 1944. Entered service at: Saugus, Mass. Birth: Saugus, Mass. G.O. No.: 1, 4 January 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, on 10 June 1944, near Vaubadon, France. As scouts were advancing across an open field, the enemy suddenly opened fire with several machineguns and hit 1 of the men. S/Sgt. DeFranzo courageously moved out in the open to the aid of the wounded scout and was himself wounded but brought the man to safety. Refusing aid, S/Sgt. DeFranzo reentered the open field and led the advance upon the enemy. There were always at least 2 machineguns bringing unrelenting fire upon him, but S/Sgt. DeFranzo kept going forward, firing into the enemy and 1 by 1 the enemy emplacements became silent. While advancing he was again wounded, but continued on until he was within 100 yards of the enemy position and even as he fell, he kept firing his rifle and waving his men forward. When his company came up behind him, S/Sgt. DeFranzo, despite his many severe wounds, suddenly raised himself and once more moved forward in the lead of his men until he was again hit by enemy fire. In a final gesture of indomitable courage, he threw several grenades at the enemy machinegun position and completely destroyed the gun. In this action, S/Sgt. DeFranzo lost his life, but by bearing the brunt of the enemy fire in leading the attack, he prevented a delay in the assault which would have been of considerable benefit to the foe, and he made possible his company's advance with a minimum of casualties. The extraordinary heroism and magnificent devotion to duty displayed by S/Sgt. DeFranzo was a great inspiration to all about him, and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the armed forces.
 
 
Kelly, John D.
*KELLY, JOHN D.
Rank and organization: Technical Sergeant (then Corporal), U.S. Army, Company E, 314th Infantry, 79th Infantry Division. Place and date: Fort du Roule, Cherbourg, France, 25 June 1944. Entered service at: Cambridge Springs, Pa. Birth: Venango Township, Pa. G.O. No.: 6, 24 January 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. On 25 June 1944, in the vicinity of Fort du Roule, Cherbourg, France, when Cpl. Kelly's unit was pinned down by heavy enemy machinegun fire emanating from a deeply entrenched strongpoint on the slope leading up to the fort, Cpl. Kelly volunteered to attempt to neutralize the strongpoint. Arming himself with a pole charge about 10 feet long and with 15 pounds of explosive affixed, he climbed the slope under a withering blast of machinegun fire and placed the charge at the strongpoint's base. The subsequent blast was ineffective, and again, alone and unhesitatingly, he braved the slope to repeat the operation. This second blast blew off the ends of the enemy guns. Cpl. Kelly then climbed the slope a third time to place a pole charge at the strongpoint's rear entrance. When this had been blown open he hurled hand grenades inside the position, forcing survivors of the enemy guncrews to come out and surrender The gallantry, tenacity of purpose, and utter disregard for personal safety displayed by Cpl. Kelly were an incentive to his comrades and worthy of emulation by all.
 
 
Monteith, Jimmie W., Jr.
*MONTEITH, JIMMIE W., JR.
Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Colleville-sur-Mer, France, 6 June 1944. Entered service at: Richmond, Va. Born: 1 July 1917, Low Moor, Va. G.O. No.: 20, 29 March 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, near Colleville-sur-Mer, France. 1st Lt. Monteith landed with the initial assault waves on the coast of France under heavy enemy fire. Without regard to his own personal safety he continually moved up and down the beach reorganizing men for further assault. He then led the assault over a narrow protective ledge and across the flat, exposed terrain to the comparative safety of a cliff. Retracing his steps across the field to the beach, he moved over to where 2 tanks were buttoned up and blind under violent enemy artillery and machinegun fire. Completely exposed to the intense fire, 1st Lt. Monteith led the tanks on foot through a minefield and into firing positions. Under his direction several enemy positions were destroyed. He then rejoined his company and under his leadership his men captured an advantageous position on the hill. Supervising the defense of his newly won position against repeated vicious counterattacks, he continued to ignore his own personal safety, repeatedly crossing the 200 or 300 yards of open terrain under heavy fire to strengthen links in his defensive chain. When the enemy succeeded in completely surrounding 1st Lt. Monteith and his unit and while leading the fight out of the situation, 1st Lt. Monteith was killed by enemy fire. The courage, gallantry, and intrepid leadership displayed by 1st Lt. Monteith is worthy of emulation.
 


OGDEN, CARLOS C.
Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company K, 314th Infantry, 79th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Fort du Roule, France, 25 June 1944. Entered service at: Fairmont, Ill. Born: 19 May 1917, Borton, Ill. G.O. No.: 49, 28 June 1945. Citation: On the morning of 25 June 1944, near Fort du Roule, guarding the approaches to Cherbourg, France, 1st Lt. Ogden's company was pinned down by fire from a German 88-mm. gun and 2 machineguns. Arming himself with an M-1 rifle, a grenade launcher, and a number of rifle and handgrenades, he left his company in position and advanced alone, under fire, up the slope toward the enemy emplacements. Struck on the head and knocked down by a glancing machinegun bullet, 1st Lt. Ogden, in spite of his painful wound and enemy fire from close range, continued up the hill. Reaching a vantage point, he silenced the 88mm. gun with a well-placed rifle grenade and then, with handgrenades, knocked out the 2 machineguns, again being painfully wounded. 1st Lt. Ogden's heroic leadership and indomitable courage in alone silencing these enemy weapons inspired his men to greater effort and cleared the way for the company to continue the advance and reach its objectives.
 
 
Peregory, Frank D.
*PEREGORY, FRANK D.
Rank and organization: Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company K 116th Infantry, 29th Infantry Division. Place and date: Grandcampe France, 8 June 1944. Entered service at: Charlottesville, Va. Born. 10 April 1915, Esmont, Va. G.O. No.: 43, 30 May 1945. Citation: On 8 June 1944, the 3d Battalion of the 116th Infantry was advancing on the strongly held German defenses at Grandcampe, France, when the leading elements were suddenly halted by decimating machinegun fire from a firmly entrenched enemy force on the high ground overlooking the town. After numerous attempts to neutralize the enemy position by supporting artillery and tank fire had proved ineffective, T/Sgt. Peregory, on his own initiative, advanced up the hill under withering fire, and worked his way to the crest where he discovered an entrenchment leading to the main enemy fortifications 200 yards away. Without hesitating, he leaped into the trench and moved toward the emplacement. Encountering a squad of enemy riflemen, he fearlessly attacked them with handgrenades and bayonet, killed 8 and forced 3 to surrender. Continuing along the trench, he single-handedly forced the surrender of 32 more riflemen, captured the machine gunners, and opened the way for the leading elements of the battalion to advance and secure its objective. The extraordinary gallantry and aggressiveness displayed by T/Sgt. Peregory are exemplary of the highest tradition of the armed forces.
 
 
D-Day - June 6, 2004 The Normandy Invasion Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient John J. Pinder Jr.
*PINDER, JOHN J., JR.
Rank and organization: Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Colleville-sur-Mer, France, 6 June 1944. Entered .service at: Burgettstown, Pa. Birth: McKees Rocks, Pa. G.O. No.: 1, 4 January 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, near Colleville-sur-Mer, France. On D-day, Technician 5th Grade Pinder landed on the coast 100 yards off shore under devastating enemy machinegun and artillery fire which caused severe casualties among the boatload. Carrying a vitally important radio, he struggled towards shore in waist-deep water. Only a few yards from his craft he was hit by enemy fire and was gravely wounded. Technician 5th Grade Pinder never stopped. He made shore and delivered the radio. Refusing to take cover afforded, or to accept medical attention for his wounds, Technician 5th Grade Pinder, though terribly weakened by loss of blood and in fierce pain, on 3 occasions went into the fire-swept surf to salvage communication equipment. He recovered many vital parts and equipment, including another workable radio. On the 3rd trip he was again hit, suffering machinegun bullet wounds in the legs. Still this valiant soldier would not stop for rest or medical attention. Remaining exposed to heavy enemy fire, growing steadily weaker, he aided in establishing the vital radio communication on the beach. While so engaged this dauntless soldier was hit for the third time and killed. The indomitable courage and personal bravery of Technician 5th Grade Pinder was a magnificent inspiration to the men with whom he served.
 
 
Roosevelt, Theodore, Jr.
*ROOSEVELT, THEODORE, JR.
Rank and organization: brigadier general, U.S. Army. Place and date: Normandy invasion, 6 June 1944. Entered service at: Oyster Bay, N.Y. Birth: Oyster Bay, N.Y. G.O. No.: 77, 28 September 1944. Citation: for gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, in France. After 2 verbal requests to accompany the leading assault elements in the Normandy invasion had been denied, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt's written request for this mission was approved and he landed with the first wave of the forces assaulting the enemy-held beaches. He repeatedly led groups from the beach, over the seawall and established them inland. His valor, courage, and presence in the very front of the attack and his complete unconcern at being under heavy fire inspired the troops to heights of enthusiasm and self-sacrifice. Although the enemy had the beach under constant direct fire, Brig. Gen. Roosevelt moved from one locality to another, rallying men around him, directed and personally led them against the enemy. Under his seasoned, precise, calm, and unfaltering leadership, assault troops reduced beach strong points and rapidly moved inland with minimum casualties. He thus contributed substantially to the successful establishment of the beachhead in France.
* - Denotes a posthumous award


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: dday; heroes; medalofhonor; militaryhistory; moh; normandy; normandyinvasion; wwii
Hat tip to Bender2 for FDRs prayer.

Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true; give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again; and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest — until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violences of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and goodwill among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home — fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters, and brothers of brave men overseas, whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them — help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too — strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and the material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us faith. Give us faith in Thee; faith in our sons; faith in each other; faith in our united crusade. Let not the keeness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment — let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogances. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace — a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all of men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.

Thy will be done, Almighty God.

Amen.

Franklin D. Roosevelt - June 6, 1944

1 posted on 06/06/2008 12:41:48 PM PDT by jazusamo
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To: Bender2; freema; SandRat; smoothsailing; Just A Nobody; RedRover; lilycicero; Girlene; brityank; ...

MOH Ping!


2 posted on 06/06/2008 12:44:51 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo

Thanks for posting. Thanks Uncle Bill (Warner). RIP.


3 posted on 06/06/2008 12:53:18 PM PDT by PGalt
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To: jazusamo

Great thread!

God Bless them all!


4 posted on 06/06/2008 12:54:42 PM PDT by Loud Mime (Ronald Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004))
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To: jazusamo
Thanks for posting this.

We owe all the men that fought in WW2 a large debt. Many men went well above and beyond that day. The battle at St. Mere Englise and the Bridge are two of the finest moments in the history of Airborne troops. So much can and needs be said but I will only add that it is my sincere wish that Richard Winters receive the Medal before he dies for the assault at Brecourt Manor. 1 DSC, 3 Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars were awarded in that small but important battle.

"Grandpa were you a hero in the war?"

"No but I served in the company of heroes."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Br%C3%A9court_Manor_Assault

5 posted on 06/06/2008 1:02:40 PM PDT by mad_as_he$$ (Will this thread be jacked by a Mormon?)
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To: jazusamo
Thanks for helping us all to remember their sacrifice.

(in the tagline - codes broadcast by the BBC to activate the French Underground, June 6, 1944)

6 posted on 06/06/2008 1:03:32 PM PDT by TonyInOhio (The dice are on the table. It is hot in Suez.)
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To: Loud Mime

And today all the stories seemed to be about the assination of Robert Kennedy.
The real meaning of 6 June..will always be D-Day.


7 posted on 06/06/2008 1:04:18 PM PDT by Oldexpat
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To: mad_as_he$$

Thanks for your post and the link to 1st Lt. Richard Winters and his mens heroic action.

Hopefully his DSC will be upgraded to the MOH, it seems appropriate.


8 posted on 06/06/2008 1:21:32 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo

General Roosevelt is buried in the US cemetery at Normandy. Buried next to him is his brother, Quinten, a US aviator killed in France in WW 1.


9 posted on 06/06/2008 1:26:17 PM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
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To: TonyInOhio

I’ll bet the Germans were pulling their hair out trying to figure what it meant, they found out soon enough. :)


10 posted on 06/06/2008 1:26:55 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo

God bless and keep Dick Winters.

Sixty four years ago today, America embarked on a great crusade.

Since 1944, we have defeated Nazism, Fascism, Emperor-worship, Communism, and are facing down Islamic terrorism.

We have freed hundreds of millions of people in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Japan,Asia, South Korea, Central America, Afghanistan,Iraq, and other places around the globe.

The American taxpayer and the American GI did all this for no gain in territory, no riches, no enslavement of other peoples. As citizens, America created so much wealth that we have been the most generous people in the history of the planet, sharing our abundance and blessings with countless millions to improve their lives.

Although the preparation started much earlier, the role of the United States of America in bringing freedom around the globe started with those brave men who parachuted and landed on the shores of Nazi Occupied Europe on a gray, bloody June morning 64 years ago today.

They just tried to stay alive that day, but they began the unshackling of untold millions from evil and slavery that still continues today, with their grandchildren in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Dick Winters and Leonard Lomell(Toms River, NJ) typified the best and brightest America had to give on D-Day. Their deeds that day must always be remembered.


11 posted on 06/06/2008 1:28:14 PM PDT by exit82 (People get the government they deserve. And they are about to get it--in spades.)
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To: exit82

Well said, exit82.


12 posted on 06/06/2008 1:39:37 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo

My regiment, the 16th Infantry, came ashore in the first wave at Omaha Beach. They were already seasoned veterans of North Africa and Sicily. Two soldiers of the Regiment, John Pinder and Jimmy Monteith were awarded the Medal of Honor for their actions that day.

I never met them, for they did not survive D-Day. But, I met many of their fellow soldiers who made the invasion. If you have watched the opening minutes of Saving Private Ryan, you have some sense for what they faced.

Two in particular come to mind:

Jake Lindsey, who later was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Hurtgen Forest served with the 16th Infantry from the landings in Morrocco through to VE Day in Czechkosolvakia. He also served with a Ranger Company in Korea and in Army Special Forces in Vietnam. Jake was known to lift a glass or two and could tell great stories.

Joe Dawson commanded G Company on D-Day. He was the first soldier to cross Omaha Beach and make it to the top of Bluffs alive. For this, he received the Distinguished Service Cross. I’ve stood with him on the spot where he climbed to the top and heard him tell what G Company was able to achieve. He was not a professional soldier and returned to Texas after the war and went into the oil business.

Both of these men remarked about what fine soldiers the Army has today, and right they both were. Time has taken its toll, and they have since joined those who fell on that day some 64 years ago. Duty First.

Joe Dawson commanded G Company on D-Day and was the first to reach the tops


13 posted on 06/06/2008 1:43:08 PM PDT by centurion316 (Democrats - Supporting Al Qaida Worldwide)
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To: jazusamo
With Deepest Gratitude ~ Remembering DDay
June 6,1944

Normandy 1944 Guide

14 posted on 06/06/2008 1:54:06 PM PDT by MEG33 (God Bless Our Military)
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To: centurion316

Thanks for relating that, centurion316.

We are losing the warriors of WWII at a fast rate now. I know from experience that many of them would not speak of their deeds to loved ones or friends after the war. Hopefully the ones that remain will relate their stories to others, their heroism deserves to be known by all.


15 posted on 06/06/2008 1:55:49 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: centurion316

Fascinating read.


16 posted on 06/06/2008 1:56:08 PM PDT by TADSLOS (The GOP death march to the gravesite is underway.)
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To: MEG33

Thanks for posting the link, MEG33. What a comprehensive guide to Normandy, will be well worth the time spent reading it.


17 posted on 06/06/2008 2:04:13 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo

Thanks for a fine post!!!!....


18 posted on 06/06/2008 2:11:33 PM PDT by GitmoSailor (AZ Cold War Veteran)
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To: jazusamo
...help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith
in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.


Those were perilous times.
And better times.

When a Democrat didn't have to fake a moral point of view in
order to win elections.

Or fear censure from the ACLU if he used "The G Word".
19 posted on 06/06/2008 2:12:07 PM PDT by VOA
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To: jazusamo

In gratitude to heros who gave their all.


20 posted on 06/06/2008 2:15:40 PM PDT by EverOnward
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To: jazusamo

I remember DDay..and going to church with my mother for prayer services for our troops.

You are most welcome..It is a great resource.I’ve seen many of the links..more to go.

Thank God for heroes such as the ones you have honored.


21 posted on 06/06/2008 2:19:23 PM PDT by MEG33 (God Bless Our Military)
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To: GitmoSailor

You’re most welcome, Gitmo. Good to see you, hope all’s well.


22 posted on 06/06/2008 2:20:43 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo

bump for publicity


23 posted on 06/06/2008 2:23:55 PM PDT by VOA
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To: jazusamo
I thought the name DeFranzo sounded familiar. There is DeFranzo Circle in Saugus, Mass. and the VFW post (2346) is named in his honor. Now I know the rest of the story.
24 posted on 06/06/2008 2:31:11 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (I tried to explain that I meant it as a compliment, but that only appears to have made things worse.)
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To: NonValueAdded
DeFranzo Circle, Saugus, MA
 

The link didn't work for me so I posted a pic of DeFranzo Circle.

25 posted on 06/06/2008 2:46:09 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: NonValueAdded
DeFranzo Circle
26 posted on 06/06/2008 3:04:51 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo
Thanks for that post. The traffic circle is history, now an interchange where rte 99 meets US 1. If that picture brings back memories to anyone, then this Blog thread is for you: Route 1 memories. How could I forget Heck Allen's?
27 posted on 06/06/2008 3:09:49 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (I tried to explain that I meant it as a compliment, but that only appears to have made things worse.)
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To: jazusamo; Bender2; Jarhead2844; USMCWriter; 1stbn27; 2111USMC; 2nd Bn, 11th Mar; 68 grunt; ...

Thank you jaz and Bender.


28 posted on 06/06/2008 4:31:32 PM PDT by freema (Proud Marine Niece, Daughter, Wife, Friend, Sister, Cousin, Mom and FRiend)
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To: jazusamo
Great men and heroes from our fathers' generation. Thank God for them and thank God that we still produce men of this caliber in today's military!


29 posted on 06/06/2008 4:55:42 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines, RVN 1969. St. Peregrine, patron saint of cancer patients, pray for us.)
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To: All
I just discovered I posted the wrong photo of LtCol Robert G. Cole. My apologies.

LtCol Robert G. Cole
Lt. Col. Robert G. Cole

30 posted on 06/06/2008 5:15:23 PM PDT by jazusamo (DefendOurMarines.org | DefendOurTroops.org)
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To: jazusamo

Thank you for that and thank you for posting all the stories. I have yet to read every one of them, but I will.


31 posted on 06/06/2008 7:51:46 PM PDT by La Enchiladita
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To: jazusamo
These men will will be always young and alive in the hearts of those who know now of them - and who learn of them as long as history continues...

With their examples, what is to be thought of those today who blandly (and most arrogantly) say, sniffingly, that their precious selves are not going to participate in the political process because some aspect of it or a candidate does not suit their ideological purity....?

And therefore they will allow politicians to turn into defeat that which our men and women of the armed forces today - in our time - have so painstakingly and so honorably and so bravely and so well accomplished in the Middle East?

These will be remembered, too - not with love but with everlasting derision.

32 posted on 06/06/2008 8:20:11 PM PDT by mtntop3
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To: jazusamo; freema

And so many honorable men and women follow in the footsteps of those that fateful day that did not return or returned missing limbs and eyes. War is hell. But the worst hell is when a peoples allow some dictator to rule over them and oppress the God given right of expression of mind, movement, and will to make a living as they well choose within the body of laws set forth. The lack of any joy in their hearts. This is the worst hell.


33 posted on 06/07/2008 4:32:09 PM PDT by Marine_Uncle (Duncan Hunter was our best choice...)
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To: jazusamo

God Bless these men. If ever our country loses the ability to find men like this that will be the end of our nation. God grant that we can find brave, selfless and courageous people like this when we are in our most dire times!


34 posted on 06/13/2008 8:05:20 PM PDT by Dawnsblood
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To: NonValueAdded

I can’t believe I googled “Heck Allen’s” and came to Freepers...LOL!

My mom is from near Saugus and we had family there too. Used to go to Heck’s when I was a little kid. I also heard that Kowloon closed..is this true? And Hilltop...none better. Loved it.

I miss it up there. I’m in FL now.


35 posted on 09/16/2008 3:34:41 PM PDT by goresalooza (Nurses Rock!)
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To: centurion316
Jake Lindsey MOH and my father, were buddies at Fort Knox. I can attest to the stories my father shared with me that Jake had told him. Apparently one story was that Jake was on the battlefield in Germany and heard a shell coming his way. He said that by the whistling sound he knew it was going to be very close and resigned himself to that being the end and didn't dive for cover. As Jake told the story the shell landed directly in front of him and it was a dud. He said if he did dive for the ground the shell would have impaled him. A funny story was that there was a General at Fort Knox that Jake used to deliberately wait for and pass frequently so that the General would have to salute him as is customary with MOH recipients’ being saluted by higher ranking officers. As my father told me during the Korean War Jake was actually put up for another battlefield honor and when word got back that he had already received the Medal of Honor in WWII and was back on the battlefield in Korea the command couldn't believe that a MOH was back out on the battlefield let alone in a different war. Apparently they pulled him out of action not wanting to jeopardize him. That's when I believe he was stationed at Fort Knox. Jake and my father lifted a few more than two glasses on many occasion's. Truly a Great Generation.
36 posted on 11/12/2008 9:31:43 PM PST by Legacyremembered
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To: Legacyremembered

Thanks for the story. Apparently there are thousands of them when it comes to Jake.


37 posted on 11/13/2008 5:43:11 AM PST by centurion316
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