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Graves Found From Sahara’s Green Period
New York Times Science ^ | August 15, 2008 | By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD

Posted on 09/15/2008 4:21:39 PM PDT by Fred Nerks

When Paul C. Sereno went hunting for dinosaur bones in the Sahara, his career took a sharp turn from paleontology to archaeology. The expedition found what has proved to be the largest known graveyard of Stone Age people who lived there when the desert was green.

The first traces of pottery, stone tools and human skeletons were discovered eight years ago at a site in the southern Sahara, in Niger. After preliminary research, Dr. Sereno, a University of Chicago scientist who had previously uncovered remains of the dinosaur Nigersaurus there, organized an international team of archaeologists to investigate what had been a lakeside hunting and fishing settlement for the better part of 5,000 years, originating some 10,000 years ago.

In its first comprehensive report, published Thursday, the team described finding about 200 graves belonging to two successive populations.

~snip

The most poignant scene was the triple burial of a petite woman lying on her side, facing two young children. The slender arms of the children reached out to the woman in an everlasting embrace. Pollen indicated that flowers had decorated the grave.

The sun-baked dunes at the site, known as Gobero, preserve the earliest and largest Stone Age cemetery in the Sahara, Dr. Sereno’s group reported in the online journal PLoS One. The findings, they wrote, open “a new window on the funerary practices, distinctive skeletal anatomy, health and diet of early hunter-fisher-gatherers, who expanded into the Sahara when climatic conditions were favorable.”

The research was also described at a news conference on Thursday in Washington at the National Geographic Society...

~snip

Other scientists said the discovery appeared to provide spectacular evidence that nothing, not even the arid expanse of the Sahara, was changeless. About 100 million years ago, this land was forested and occupied by dinosaurs and enormous crocodiles...

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: ahaggar; climatechange; cyrenaica; environment; fossils; godsgravesglyphs; graves; greatchots; greeks; henrilhote; mycenaeans; niger; sahara
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slideshow at link

1 posted on 09/15/2008 4:21:39 PM PDT by Fred Nerks
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To: Fred Nerks

place holder


2 posted on 09/15/2008 4:23:46 PM PDT by Raycpa
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To: SunkenCiv

Sahara graves ping


3 posted on 09/15/2008 4:26:17 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: Fred Nerks

Did you notice the teeth? All straight and perfect with no decay, none missing.


4 posted on 09/15/2008 4:30:49 PM PDT by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: Fred Nerks
Stone Age people who lived there when the desert was green.

What???!!! The Saraha desert was once GREEN??

I guess driving around in their stone age SUVs made their climate change! Oh when will we learn...

5 posted on 09/15/2008 4:35:28 PM PDT by meowmeow (In Loving Memory of Our Dear Viking Kitty (1987-2006))
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To: count-your-change
Did you notice the teeth? All straight and perfect with no decay, none missing.

They died early back then and had a low sugar diet.

6 posted on 09/15/2008 4:37:49 PM PDT by Centurion2000 (McCain/Palin 2008 : Palin the Paladin 2012)
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To: count-your-change

interesting.


7 posted on 09/15/2008 4:38:11 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (No prisoners. No mercy. Fight back or STFU!!!)
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To: count-your-change

The most poignant scene was the triple burial of a petite woman lying on her side, facing two young children. The slender arms of the children reached out to the woman in an everlasting embrace. Pollen indicated that flowers had decorated the grave.

I think they died suddenly, were covered by sand and silt; the pollen=grave theory isn't convincing.

8 posted on 09/15/2008 4:44:59 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: count-your-change

That is very, very out of the ordinary. I would say very slim chances of a find like that.


9 posted on 09/15/2008 5:28:57 PM PDT by WVNight (We havn't played Cowboys and Muslims yet....)
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To: count-your-change
Did you notice the teeth? All straight and perfect with no decay, none missing.

I noticed. I guess that means they didn't emigrate to the British isles.

10 posted on 09/15/2008 5:31:36 PM PDT by Moonman62 (The issue of whether cheap labor makes America great should have been settled by the Civil War.)
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To: Fred Nerks
Damn you Global Warming!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


11 posted on 09/15/2008 5:41:17 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Amazing how Obama, Rangel, Biden and Dodd all got killer mortgage rates and below cost property.)
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To: Moonman62

I knew you had but it has always been interesting to me how that people that didn’t do any of the things considered necessary to good dental health today had such beautiful chompers. What are we doing wrong?


12 posted on 09/15/2008 5:45:32 PM PDT by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: Centurion2000

The skull in the picture appears to be adult with all jaw teeth, no caries, none crooked. Something more than low sugar diet I think. If they find a skull with braces...now there’s news!


13 posted on 09/15/2008 5:59:17 PM PDT by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: Fred Nerks

You mean pollen doesn’t equal flowers equals grave? Or area not green in past? I don’t understand.


14 posted on 09/15/2008 6:09:20 PM PDT by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: count-your-change
...Or area not green in past?...

Tassili-n-Ajjer>

Tassili-n-Ajjer in Algeria is one of the most famous North African sites of rock painting. Its imagery documents a verdant Sahara teeming with life that stands in stark contrast to the arid desert the region has since become. Tassili paintings and engravings, like those of other rock art areas in the Sahara, are commonly divided into at least four chronological periods based on style and content. These are: an archaic tradition depicting wild animals whose antiquity is unknown but certainly goes back well before 4500 B.C.; a so-called bovidian tradition, which corresponds to the arrival of cattle in North Africa between 4500 and 4000 B.C.; a "horse" tradition, which corresponds to the appearance of horses in the North African archaeological record from about 2000 B.C. onward; and a "camel" tradition, which emerges around the time of Christ when these animals first appear in North Africa.

Engravings of animals such as the extinct giant buffalo are among the earliest works, followed later by paintings in which color is used to depict humans and animals with striking naturalism. In the last period, chariots, shields, and camels appear in the rock paintings. Although close to the Iberian Peninsula, it is currently believed that the rock art of Algeria and Tassili developed independently of that in Europe.


15 posted on 09/15/2008 6:42:39 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: count-your-change
I knew you had but it has always been interesting to me how that people that didn’t do any of the things considered necessary to good dental health today had such beautiful chompers. What are we doing wrong?

How do you know that they were not doing any of the things considered necessary to good dental health?

Tooth twigs and chewing certain plants clean the teeth, kill bacteria and freshen breath.

Some plants are very high in fluoride such as tea, drinking it or rinsing out your mouth keeps your teeth strong.

I do doubt they saw the dentist every six months though.

16 posted on 09/15/2008 6:50:19 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Just say No to Lawyers! Palin '08! (oh and McWhatshisname too. I guess))
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To: meowmeow

The great Tassili Park, vast and beautiful expanse of rock and sand reaching the far southeast of Algeria presents a huge concentration of prehistoric rock art. Located in a strange lunar landscape of great geological interest, this site has one of the most important groupings of prehistoric cave art in the world.

Archaeological discoveries made by Henri Loth in the 1950s made Tassili famous. According to the Tassili National Park Office, the Neolithic archaeological heritage is concentrated in the Djanet region, with more than 15,000 stone carvings and paintings., and Oued Djarat is one of the most prestigious sites in Tassili Park as itcontains 4,000 stone carvings and paintings, which have partially resisted the difficult climatic conditions. The archaeological heritage recorded up to now provides evidence of a civilisation that dates back 2.5 million years.

This civilisation experienced prosperity as it evolved from precariousness to stability as it discovered pottery and how domesticate animals.

They lived on the shores of an ancient Lake!

17 posted on 09/15/2008 7:14:08 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear
Maybe some camel powered drills and polishing equipment will turn up with instructions for installing braces.
Tea? I wondered how the Brits did it.
18 posted on 09/15/2008 7:19:57 PM PDT by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: count-your-change
The British dump milk and sugar in their tea which kind of defeats the purpose. :)

Both stick to the teeth and promote decay.

Starchy foods and boiled sweets, something they are very fond of but that this tribe would not have had much access to are also "sticky" foods.

19 posted on 09/15/2008 7:26:52 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Just say No to Lawyers! Palin '08! (oh and McWhatshisname too. I guess))
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To: Fred Nerks

I’m a bit slow tonite. Beautiful pix. I seem to recall ground pentrating radar showing ancient rivers flowed where it’s dry now.
Thanks.


20 posted on 09/15/2008 7:29:56 PM PDT by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: blam

You’re needed here!


21 posted on 09/15/2008 7:32:59 PM PDT by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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Already posted, but I may just ping it again ‘coz it’s interesting.

Scientists Explore Lakefront Property, in the Sahara
The New York Times | January 27, 2004 | BRENDA FOWLER
Posted on 02/01/2004 1:36:28 PM PST by sarcasm
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1069653/posts

[snip] someone on the team, led by Dr. Paul Sereno of the University of Chicago, spotted something dark against the tawny dunes... In search of pieces of the 110-million-year-old Cretaceous puzzle, Dr. Sereno’s team had found what archaeologists in Niger say is a large Neolithic, or Stone Age, burial and settlement site tentatively dated at 5,000 years old. [end]

Stone Age Cemetery, Artifacts Un Earthed In Sahara
National Geographic | Brian Hanwerk
Posted on 10/23/2005 4:56:10 PM PDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1507889/posts

[snip] Archaeologists have excavated a trove of Stone Age human skeletons and artifacts on the shores of an ancient lake in the Sahara... “They were living on a diet rich in catfish, mollusks, and shells,” said Paul Sereno, a University of Chicago paleontologist and National Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence... “’There are whole human skeletons just over there,’ [Hettwer] said, pointing to a low ridge,” Sereno wrote in a 2000 online dispatch from the field. “Our jaws dropped as we tiptoed among skeletons that were buried thousands of years ago. Around the neck of one, we found a series of beads — the outline of a necklace!” In 2003 Sereno returned to map the site and stopped counting at 173 skeletons, which easily made it the largest New Stone Age cemetery ever found in the Sahara. “We saw jewelry on the surface, tools everywhere, the remains of hundreds of people,” Sereno recalled. “I knew that I had to help an archaeological team get a footing out there.” [end]

US scientists find stone age burial ground in Sahara
AFP | Aug 14, 2008 | Jean-Louis Santini
Posted on 08/14/2008 12:40:47 PM PDT by decimon
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2061932/posts

Graves Found From Sahara’s Green Period
NYT | 08/15/08 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
Posted on 08/15/2008 1:06:10 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2062227/posts

-related-

Prehistoric Desert Town Found In Western Sahara (15,000 Years Old)
Reuters | 8-19-2004 | Reuters
Posted on 08/20/2004 9:10:09 AM PDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1195560/posts

Scientists Find Fossil Proof Of Egypt’s Ancient Climate
Washington University At St Louis | 2-2-2005 | Tony Fitzpatrick
Posted on 02/03/2005 11:54:52 PM EST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1335616/posts

Ancient lakes of the Sahara
Innovations Report | Jan 19, 2006 | University of Reading
Posted on 01/21/2006 7:14:03 AM EST by Tyche
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1562135/posts

Sahara Desert Was Once Lush and Populated
LiveScience | 20 July 2006 | Bjorn Carey
Posted on 07/20/2006 3:55:53 PM PDT by Marius3188
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1669466/posts

Exodus From Drying Sahara Gave Rise to Pharaohs, Study Says
National Geographic News | July 20, 2006 | Sean Markey (no funky bunch)
Posted on 07/22/2006 6:34:42 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1670680/posts

Ruins of 7,000-year-old city found in Egypt oasis
Source: ABC (Australia) | January 30, 2008 - 9:47AM | U/A
Posted on 01/29/2008 9:36:38 PM PST by Fred Nerks
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1961826/posts

Egypt’s Earliest Agricultural Settlement Unearthed
Science Daily | 2-15-2008 | University of California - Los Angeles
Posted on 02/15/2008 2:27:15 PM PST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1971126/posts

The Tassili n’Ajjer [Algeria] : birthplace of ancient Egypt ?
Journal 3 | 04-05-08 | Phillip Coppens
Posted on 04/05/2008 4:08:59 PM PDT by Renfield
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1997350/posts

Sahara dried out slowly, not abruptly: study
Reuters | Thu May 8, 2008 2:10pm EDT | Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent
Posted on 05/08/2008 2:12:41 PM PDT by suthener
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2013235/posts

Once Lush Sahara Dried Up Over Millennia, Study Says
National Geographic News | 5-8-2008 | James Owen
Posted on 05/08/2008 7:08:12 PM PDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2013403/posts

-also-

Adventurer crosses sands that conquered a king
The Times Online | Jan 28, 2006 | Martin Penner
Posted on 01/27/2006 11:33:56 PM PST by Tyche
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1566712/posts

Egyptologists’ palm nearly extinct.
newscientist | 3 6
Posted on 06/06/2006 8:53:33 AM PDT by S0122017
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1644323/posts

Dying Trade Of The Sahara Camel Trade
BBC | 10-22-2006 | John Pilkington
Posted on 10/22/2006 3:19:43 PM PDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1724004/posts

In Search Of The Lost Sahara
eitb24.com | 5-15-2008
Posted on 05/18/2008 7:00:06 PM PDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2017884/posts

UN vandals spray graffiti on Sahara’s prehistoric art
Times Online (UK) | January 31 2008 | Dalya Alberge
Posted on 01/31/2008 3:47:29 AM PST by knighthawk
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1962475/posts


22 posted on 09/15/2008 9:58:46 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: Fred Nerks; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Fred Nerks. It's a bit of a repeat, but I'm pinging it anyway. :')

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

· Google · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology magazine · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Mirabilis · Texas AM Anthropology News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo ·
· History or Science & Nature Podcasts · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


23 posted on 09/15/2008 9:59:45 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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Drought That Destroyed A Civilisation
The Herald (UK) | 11-11-2003 | Martin Willians
Posted on 11/16/2003 11:05:23 AM PST by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1022897/posts


24 posted on 09/15/2008 10:03:58 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: SunkenCiv

You left out a nice one.

Crocodiles found in the Sahara and adapted to the Desert.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/06/0617_020618_croc.html?fs=travel.nationalgeographic.com

‘The desert crocodiles have adapted to the changing environment in northern Africa; 8,000 to 10,000 years ago, what is now desert was probably lush savannah and grasslands. Today the Sahara is hot and arid, the land sandy, rainfall minimal, and vegetation sparse.

“The extension of range almost certainly reflects climatic changes,” said Ross. “We know that even in Roman times, the Sahara was much wetter and greener than it is now. As these places slowly dried up, remnant populations became isolated from the other crocodiles on the continent. How these populations adapted to the changing conditions is most interesting.” ‘


25 posted on 09/15/2008 10:14:56 PM PDT by BGHater (Democracy is the road to socialism.)
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To: BGHater

:’) I remember a nice NatGeo shot of crocs living in a spring-fed waterhole down in some crevasse in the Sahara. I had to wonder, what do they eat? :’) One of the linked topics up there had a short discussion of it, but (uh-oh) I can’t remember which one, I went through all of them in a hurry. :’)


26 posted on 09/15/2008 10:34:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: Fred Nerks

and the race was?


27 posted on 09/15/2008 10:36:54 PM PDT by wardaddy (I want to be David Duchovny's character on Californication for just one week)
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To: SunkenCiv

You do an amazing job, putting out a ton of material for us.

I really appreciate it and it’s something I look forward to reading. Thanks again.


28 posted on 09/15/2008 10:43:58 PM PDT by BGHater (Democracy is the road to socialism.)
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To: wardaddy; SunkenCiv

Two distinct cultures lived at Gobero. The Kiffians, like the male at left, were tall. This skull was dated at 9,500 years ago. A dry interlude chased the Kiffians away. When the rains returned, the Tenerians, who were shorter and leaner, populated the area. The Tenerian male, right, died when he was about 18. The skull was dated at 5,800 years old.

(Civ: What am I supposed to think about this? Did the brow-ridges disappear in less than a thousand years...or what? LOL!)

29 posted on 09/15/2008 10:46:29 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: Fred Nerks

wow....look at the brain volume cavity in general on the right compared to the smaller left

that looks like Forrest Griffin’s skull on the left


30 posted on 09/15/2008 10:52:44 PM PDT by wardaddy (I want to be David Duchovny's character on Californication for just one week)
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To: Fred Nerks
"Did the brow-ridges disappear in less than a thousand years...or what?"

There are 27 extinct species of humans...many of these lived at the same time. Maybe that's the explanation?

Extinct Humans

31 posted on 09/15/2008 11:00:51 PM PDT by blam
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To: BGHater; decimon; BenLurkin; Fred Nerks

Thanks! I get plenty of help, and always have — blam was posting these topics at least 8 years ago; now you, decimon, benlurkin, fred nerks, and numerous others contribute these directly or indirectly, and you all have my thanks. :’)


32 posted on 09/15/2008 11:02:02 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: SunkenCiv
one of your links mentions the ancient 'town' of d'Argilas, supposedly Berber, 15,000YA.

Found this incredible piece of rockart from the area, sorry the caption is in French!

Profondément à l’intérieur du territoire marocain, des scientifiques marocains sont tombés sur les ruines, recouvertes de sable, de la cité d’Arghilas, relevant d’une antique civilisation berbère.

33 posted on 09/15/2008 11:05:14 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: blam
...many of these lived at the same time. Maybe that's the explanation?

Hello!

And now there's only one? What happend to the others?

34 posted on 09/15/2008 11:09:23 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Some Brits and Irish hold a sugar cube in their teeth while they sip tea. And those front teeth rot out first. Kind of scary how the sugar destroys the teeth where it is actually held, in those few seconds of sipping. You’d think the bad effects would be a little more evenly distributed among the teeth. I see teenagers drinking sodas with sugar—and I’ve discovered that they’ve been told in government school that Splenda and Equal are dangerous poisons! Lefty Commie Red Maoist Democrat teachers!


35 posted on 09/15/2008 11:36:00 PM PDT by Arthur McGowan
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To: Fred Nerks
Right, it is in the way they are arranged like they were alive when buried. They almost look like they were caught looking at each other. The mom looks like she is shocked with her mouth open. The hands look intertwined like they held each other as they died. It looks like they knew they were going to die and layed down and held each other to the end. It's the drama of the thing.
36 posted on 09/15/2008 11:39:47 PM PDT by Bellflower (A Brand New Day Is Coming!)
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To: count-your-change
I seem to recall ground pentrating radar showing ancient rivers flowed where it’s dry now.

I wish I could see the map of the rivers. Does anyone have more info on this?

37 posted on 09/15/2008 11:44:34 PM PDT by Bellflower (A Brand New Day Is Coming!)
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To: Bellflower

Yes, I agree with your observation, it looks as if their fingers are locked.


38 posted on 09/15/2008 11:55:03 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: Bellflower

http://eob.gsfc.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NewImages/images.php3?img_id=4900

enlarge this image to see numerous ancient river-courses that appear to end in a huge lake basin.


39 posted on 09/16/2008 12:10:54 AM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: SunkenCiv
Desert Crocodiles.

Today the best known remaining relict populations can be found in the Ennedi mountains of Chad (photo) and the Tagant in Mauritania. The Tagant population was thought to have disappeared in 1996 when the ‘last’ head was brought in for scientific research after the animal itself had been eaten by local inhabitants (photo). It was a big surprise when in 2007 Ursula Steiner photographed at least three crocs. Unless there is permanent water, desert crocs aestivate in deep burrows during the hot season. This is probably why the Tagant group had been overlooked for so long.


40 posted on 09/16/2008 12:18:21 AM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: Bellflower

You might try entering “rivers in the sahara pictures images” in google. There are a few there.


41 posted on 09/16/2008 1:14:57 AM PDT by count-your-change (you don't have to be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: Fred Nerks; Delacon; According2RecentPollsAirIsGood; TenthAmendmentChampion; calcowgirl; Horusra; ..
 


Global Warming Scam News & Views
Entrepreneur's Compilation of
The Best Global Warming Videos on the Internet

42 posted on 09/16/2008 3:34:57 AM PDT by steelyourfaith
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To: Fred Nerks; wardaddy
They didn't make it.

About 68% of Europeans have DNA haplogroups that are from the Iberian Ice Age Refuge, yDNA = R1b and mtDNA = 'H'.

I think it is informative to note the haplogroups amoung the Guanches of the Canary Islands. When the Ice Age began to end, the refugees migrated all over Europe and at the same time into Northern Africa.
My guess is that at one time, Northern Africa was probably inhabited by White people who mixed with Black Africans became Berbers and etc.

Canary Isands DNA Project

"The Guanches are the mysterious natives of the Canary Islands. They were conquered by the Spaniards during the turn of the 15th century. Tall, blond and blue-eyed, the Guanches have long intrigued the anthropologists, for blond natives are rarity. According to the reliable Encyclopedia Britannica, the Guanches "are thought to have been of Cro-Magnon origin... and had a brown complexion, blue or gray eyes, and blondish hair."

43 posted on 09/16/2008 7:01:30 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam

You and I will be in that book soon enough..lol


44 posted on 09/16/2008 8:01:06 AM PDT by wardaddy (I want to be David Duchovny's character on Californication for just one week)
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To: Fred Nerks

In my family we still have the brow ridges and the extended sternums.

There’s a lot of variability in the living human family that can’t be shown with a handful of specimens.

But I think the Geiko caveman jokes are funny. ;)


45 posted on 09/16/2008 8:09:47 AM PDT by <1/1,000,000th%
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To: Fred Nerks

that (four horse?) chariot rock art piece makes one wonder what the actual age of such rock art happens to be. :’) Great find!


46 posted on 09/16/2008 8:52:45 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: wardaddy
"You and I will be in that book soon enough..lol"

Nah! The coming Ice Age will save us.

47 posted on 09/16/2008 10:24:32 AM PDT by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/tass/hd_tass.htm

...Tassili-n-Ajjer in Algeria is one of the most famous North African sites of rock painting. Its imagery documents a verdant Sahara teeming with life that stands in stark contrast to the arid desert the region has since become. Tassili paintings and engravings, like those of other rock art areas in the Sahara, are commonly divided into at least four chronological periods based on style and content. These are: an archaic tradition depicting wild animals whose antiquity is unknown but certainly goes back well before 4500 B.C.; a so-called bovidian tradition, which corresponds to the arrival of cattle in North Africa between 4500 and 4000 B.C.; a “horse” tradition, which corresponds to the appearance of horses in the North African archaeological record from about 2000 B.C. onward; ...


48 posted on 09/16/2008 6:35:28 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: SunkenCiv

http://www.metrum.org/mapping/sahara.htm

...Our knowledge of the ancient Sahara was revolutionized by the publication, in 1957, or the results of Henri Lhote’s investigations of the rock paintings of the central Sahara. These paintings indicate that there was a time when chariots drawn by horses crossed the Sahara from the Mediterranean coast to the river Niger. This indicates that the process of dissication of the Sahara had reached a point in which transportation by river was no longer possible from the Great Chots to the Ahaggar and from there to the Niger, but the land could still support horses. One principle used by Lhote in dating this chariot route is the fact that the horses are portrayed on the rock painting according to style conventions that occur in Mycenaean art. Lhote assumes that the Mycenaeans, like the Greeks who followed them, had colonized Cyrenaica and that from there had advanced into the Sahara area...


49 posted on 09/16/2008 6:46:19 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: SunkenCiv
compare #33

Ramses II at the battle of Kadesh.

50 posted on 09/16/2008 6:59:49 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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