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Placing Sarah Palin's accent
Slate ^ | 10/1/08 | Jesse Sheidlower

Posted on 10/01/2008 11:38:12 AM PDT by T-Bird45

Since Sarah Palin was selected as the Republican candidate for vice president, many people have made comments about her unusual speech, comparing it to accents heard in the movie Fargo, in the states of Wisconsin and Idaho, and in Canada. Some have even attributed her manner of speaking to her supposed stupidity. But Palin actually has an Alaskan accent, one from the Matnuska and Susitna Valley region, where Palin's hometown, Wasilla, is located.

(Excerpt) Read more at slate.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; Politics/Elections; US: Alaska; US: Minnesota
KEYWORDS: canadian; dialect; fargo; matsu; regionalisms; wasilla
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To: Clemenza

LOL! With the first, I LOVE Italian water ice (and I pretty much it the way you rendered it) during the summer. However, due to national chains like Subway, “hoagie” and “sub” were interchangable, at least in northern Delaware where I grew up.


101 posted on 10/01/2008 1:23:26 PM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: downtownconservative

I gathered you were being light, but I know there are people out there who think we’re all liberals out here on the East Coast.


102 posted on 10/01/2008 1:24:38 PM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If the angels could be jealous of men, they would be so for one reason: Holy Communion." -M. Kolbe)
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To: angcat
What American accent do you have?
Your Result: The Midland
 

"You have a Midland accent" is just another way of saying "you don't have an accent." You probably are from the Midland (Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, southern Indiana, southern Illinois, and Missouri) but then for all we know you could be from Florida or Charleston or one of those big southern cities like Atlanta or Dallas. You have a good voice for TV and radio.

The South
 
Philadelphia
 
The Inland North
 
The West
 
The Northeast
 
Boston
 
North Central
 
What American accent do you have?
Quiz Created on GoToQuiz

I was born and raised in Southern California and live in Orange County. I don't get this "Midland" stuff. However, I always understood that a California accent was a mix of all American accents, because of the Gold Rush (and probably of what happened after World War II when every one wanted to move here)

103 posted on 10/01/2008 1:29:53 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: NathanR
As I said upthread, the Anglo Californian accent is bet typified by former governor Pete Wilson. Its an amalgam of the interior west and the lower midwest (lots of Iowans moved to CA in the 19th and early 20th centuries).

I'm still wondering were "like, oh my god!" comes from. I also wonder why Californians say "THE 405" or "THE I-5" instead of simply "I-5" like us normal people do.

104 posted on 10/01/2008 1:34:05 PM PDT by Clemenza (PRIVATIZE FANNIE AND FREDDIE! NO MORE BAILOUTS!)
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To: NathanR
As I said upthread, the Anglo Californian accent is best typified by former governor Pete Wilson. Its an amalgam of the interior west and the lower midwest (lots of Iowans moved to CA in the 19th and early 20th centuries).

I'm still wondering were "like, oh my god!" comes from. I also wonder why Californians say "THE 405" or "THE I-5" instead of simply "I-5" like us normal people do.

105 posted on 10/01/2008 1:34:17 PM PDT by Clemenza (PRIVATIZE FANNIE AND FREDDIE! NO MORE BAILOUTS!)
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To: unspun
He doesn't sound very Hawaiian. Methinks he basically lost his accent when trying to sound like an educated Chicagoan and a south side brother at the same time.

From Michelle's manner of speaking, I can tell that she is lower middle class black from the urban midwest. The NYC "black accent" is heavily influenced by the Caribbean as well as from white New Yorkers (listen to Charlie Rangel speak sometime to see the influence of the latter). During the whole ebonics controversy, Bill Cosby pointed out that he was wondering if the educators would use Philly ebonics or Houston ebonics.

106 posted on 10/01/2008 1:37:50 PM PDT by Clemenza (PRIVATIZE FANNIE AND FREDDIE! NO MORE BAILOUTS!)
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To: pburgh01

Northern and eastern Ohio speak very similarly to western Pennsylvanians. Said accent seems to stop at the Indiana line.


107 posted on 10/01/2008 1:38:39 PM PDT by Clemenza (PRIVATIZE FANNIE AND FREDDIE! NO MORE BAILOUTS!)
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To: T-Bird45
i think it comes from the "nails-on-chalkboard" region of the US.

ha! just kidding people. but i can tell she has consciously been keeping her tone down as to not remind us all of the hitlery cackle.

108 posted on 10/01/2008 1:41:11 PM PDT by thefactor (yes, as a matter of fact i DID only read the excerpt.)
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To: Paradox
Whatever it is, its cute. Kind of annoyingly cute. Awww heck, I have a confession to make, I think Sarah is cute. I mean, I still think she will make a GREAT VP, and then some.. but she is still cute..

Yep. And I'm 11 years her junior.

109 posted on 10/01/2008 1:41:12 PM PDT by Palmetto
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
I guess they would qualify as ‘shanty’...

Probably, but that was then, this is now.

I'm proud of my "shanty" heritage, they kept going against the odds.

110 posted on 10/01/2008 1:42:00 PM PDT by Madame Dufarge
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To: thefactor

The “Hillary cackle” is unique to Ms. Clinton, and is not common among other folks from the Chicago suburbs.


111 posted on 10/01/2008 1:43:13 PM PDT by Clemenza (PRIVATIZE FANNIE AND FREDDIE! NO MORE BAILOUTS!)
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To: T-Bird45

I thought she spoke just fine. Now ol’ Barney Frank, now he has a funny accent.


112 posted on 10/01/2008 1:50:42 PM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
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To: Clemenza
Sorry, don't recall Wilson's accent. Was it “Midland” as well?

First of all it is “The 5”, not “The I5”. Actually “The 5” was called either “The Santa Ana freeway” or “The Golden State Freeway” before the Imnn nomenclature was even thought of by Washington. We even had the first freeway called the Pasadena Freeway, built before WWII, so we can call freeways whatever we want.

113 posted on 10/01/2008 1:54:28 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: Bear_in_RoseBear

“To my ear, she sounds remarkably like the character Pickles in the animated Cartoon Network show “Metalocalypse”.”

Now I realize why I like her so much. That is the funniest show I have seen in a long time.


114 posted on 10/01/2008 1:57:42 PM PDT by mickey finn
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To: GOP_Proud

Ha, could make a joke, but I won’t. :)


115 posted on 10/01/2008 1:58:08 PM PDT by machogirl (i)
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To: NathanR
In Jer-Z, we say "the parkway" and "the turnpike", but never use "the" when talking about numbered highways ("95", "Route 1", etc.).

The Central Valley is a different case, with the "Okie" influence being highly prevalent in places like Oildale and Taft.

116 posted on 10/01/2008 1:59:12 PM PDT by Clemenza (PRIVATIZE FANNIE AND FREDDIE! NO MORE BAILOUTS!)
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To: T-Bird45

To my ear, when Obama is making a stump speech, he uses a southern drawl. Where would a guy who grew up in Hawaii and Indonesia, and who lives in Chicago - get a SOUTHERN accent?


117 posted on 10/01/2008 2:01:20 PM PDT by Sloopy
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To: Clemenza
I could never tell the difference between a “turnpike” and a “parkway”, except that “turnpike” is a very old term and indicates a toll road.

It would make sense that the Central Valley would have an Okie influence. However, I am only familiar with the Central Coast and Southern California.

118 posted on 10/01/2008 2:10:37 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: NathanR

Parkways were originally intended for “sunday driving”, providing scenery for a nice drive with the family. This is why the original parkways in the northeast banned both trucks and billboards. “Turnpikes” are synonomous with toll roads in my part of the country, although the Garden State Parkway charges tolls but is not called a turnpike! Confusing, but we’re used to it.


119 posted on 10/01/2008 2:14:17 PM PDT by Clemenza (PRIVATIZE FANNIE AND FREDDIE! NO MORE BAILOUTS!)
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To: Clemenza

Ah. I thought it was something like that. Now they seem exactly the same. (But I didn’t stay around long enough to tell the difference or care.)


120 posted on 10/01/2008 2:25:10 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: Perdogg; AdmSmith; Berosus; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Fred Nerks; ...

Thanks Perdogg.


121 posted on 10/01/2008 2:45:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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To: machogirl
You mean they all don’t talk like harry reid?

Some do & some don't. Dealers there come from all over the world. Las Vegas also draws gamblers from the whole world. Dealers are exposed to the dialect quirks of the entire US & "where are you from?" is common chit chat. Dialects are regional, more than they are state by state. The closer you are to home, the less you're going to notice differences. They might be able to get more specific if you stay at their table longer, but I said 5 minutes, which is enough time to get the region right.

122 posted on 10/01/2008 3:22:50 PM PDT by GoLightly
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To: angcat

I must admit, even though I had a grandfather from northern New Jersey, the accent exhibited by that character “Fran” on that “nanny” show a few years ago to my ears is like fingernails on a chalkboard.

Of course my grandfather’s accent wasn’t strong at all (he lived most of his life in s. California), but, my, my...the serious Joisey/Long GUYlund, etc. accent makes my skin crawl....


123 posted on 10/01/2008 3:42:04 PM PDT by AnalogReigns
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To: Married with Children

http://www.geocities.com/yvain.geo/dialects.html

Look at region #24, and look for YAT.

I know a woman from NO, and I understand your question.


124 posted on 10/01/2008 4:29:27 PM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: GoLightly

interesting.
when the msm says that nevada is leaning toward barry, i wonder why?


125 posted on 10/01/2008 4:35:01 PM PDT by machogirl (i)
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To: Madame Dufarge

“”Shanty Irish” were looked down upon by earlier Irish immigrants who had achieved a measure of economic success...”

That is the origin of the term “scots-irish” or “scotch-irish” as some say.

Before the arrival of the famine settlers (shanty irish)from Ireland in the 1840s, the earlier immigrants and their descendants called themselves “Irish.”

But the famine folks were a motley bunch, hence a new term had to go into use to name the older, established respectable ones: “scots-irish.”

The first big significant immigration of “scots-irish” was five ships, in 1718 landing at Boston. From there they spread out.

Later and bigger immigrations settled Pennsylvania and mainly southward after migrating and so forth.

I come from a line of the 1718 bunch, who moved a few times.


126 posted on 10/01/2008 4:42:51 PM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: T-Bird45

People in Idaho have no discernable accent whatever. The rest of you talk funny.


127 posted on 10/01/2008 4:43:56 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
Definitely N. Wisconsin/UP> Sounds very familiar to me from my travels in the area.

This article gets it right. I am from S. Wisconsin, so I'm not pegged with a "Fargo" accent, but I can certainly tell differences in that pattern of speech. It's not a N. Wisconsin accent, but I can definitely see how people who haven't heard it on a regular basis could see that. Depending on the words that she uses in a sentence, she may not actually hit one that gives it away.
128 posted on 10/01/2008 5:02:18 PM PDT by July 4th
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To: T-Bird45

I never thought we in the Northwest had an accent. She does have a sweet voice. She is one woman who could tell me to go clean the garage and it would be a pleasure to hear the words come out of her mouth.


129 posted on 10/01/2008 5:08:30 PM PDT by NavyCanDo
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To: NathanR
I'm from Yonkers NY and I have a classic New Yawk accent. I live with the hicks now in PA and my 5 year old is using a word that mortifies me instead of saying mine they say myin. I have repeatedly explained to her that this is not how we speak and not to use that word!
130 posted on 10/01/2008 5:15:28 PM PDT by angcat
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To: Clemenza
I'm still wondering were "like, oh my god!" comes from. I also wonder why Californians say "THE 405" or "THE I-5" instead of simply "I-5" like us normal people do.

I can't say where the "like, ohmigod!" stuff came from, other than to say that it was the original San Fernando valley girl thing, but calling the freeways "the 5" or "the 101" is a So Cal thing only. Those of us in Nor Cal do not do that - and that includes the SF Bay Area. It's actually one way to tell what part of California a person grew up in.
131 posted on 10/01/2008 5:19:21 PM PDT by fr_freak
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To: angcat
LOL Regional accents, don't you just love them. (BTW have you ever used youse as the plural of you?)
132 posted on 10/01/2008 5:24:44 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: NathanR

Your quiz says I’m probably from northern Jersey. I’m from Appalachian North Carolina.


133 posted on 10/01/2008 5:30:06 PM PDT by gitmo (Some days you're the dog. Some days you're the hydrant.)
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To: T-Bird45

Her accent sounds just like Canadians — the most noticable thing is the long vowels, particularly the o’s.


134 posted on 10/01/2008 5:31:29 PM PDT by webschooner (McWhatshisname/Palin 2008 !!)
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To: NathanR
I must admit I have been caught saying “youse guys” but not at work at home. My husband laughs.
135 posted on 10/01/2008 5:35:00 PM PDT by angcat
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To: truth_seeker

A great book for those of us who decended from Scots-Irish and those interested in early American history.

BORN FIGHTING: HOW THE SCOTS-IRISH SHAPED AMERICA

http://www.amazon.com/Born-Fighting-Scots-Irish-Shaped-America/dp/0767916883

Former navy secretary James Webb (Fields of Fire; etc.) wants not only to offer a history of the Scots-Irish but to redeem them from their redneck, hillbilly stereotype and place them at the center of American history and culture. As Webb relates, the Scots-Irish first emigrated to the U.S., 200,000 to 400,000 strong, in four waves during the 18th century, settling primarily in Appalachia before spreading west and south. Webb’s thesis is that the Scots-Irish, with their rugged individualism, warrior culture built on extended familial groups (the “kind of people who would die in place rather than retreat”) and an instinctive mistrust of authority, created an American culture that mirrors these traits. Webb has a genuine flair for describing the battles the Scots-Irish fought during their history, but his analysis of their role in America’s social and political history is, ironically for someone trying to crush stereotypes, fixated on what he sees, in almost Manichaean terms, as a class conflict between the Scots-Irish and America’s “paternalistic Ivy League-centered, media-connected, politically correct power centers.”


136 posted on 10/01/2008 5:35:25 PM PDT by NavyCanDo
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To: angcat
For years, I had no idea what that word meant. (I only heard it in movies.) Eventually I figured out it was some mutant plural of “you”, and said “OK that almost makes sense” LOL
137 posted on 10/01/2008 5:40:26 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: gitmo

Not my quiz. I found it down (or is it up) thread.


138 posted on 10/01/2008 5:42:15 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: webschooner

“Her accent sounds just like Canadians — the most noticable thing is the long vowels, particularly the o’s.”

I Agree. British Columbia has a distinct accent, that is even different that much of the rest of Canada, and living here in the Northwest just a hundred miles from the border I come across it all the time. I once dated a girl living in Vancouver and she did talk allot like Sarah. I remember thinking how cute it was.


139 posted on 10/01/2008 5:48:44 PM PDT by NavyCanDo
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To: NathanR

“First of all it is “The 5”, not “The I5”. Actually “The 5” was called either “The Santa Ana freeway” or “The Golden State Freeway” before the Imnn nomenclature was even thought of by Washington. We even had the first freeway called the Pasadena Freeway, built before WWII, so we can call freeways whatever we want.”

Right on, dude. Who says Lost Angeles has no history? A lot of us (old timer natives) still refer to the freeways as you state:

Santa Ana, San Diego, Newport, Garden Grove, Riverside, Hollywood, Santa Monica, Ventura, Pasadena, Long Beach, San Bernardino, Pomona, etc.

Relatively newer freeways often go mainly by their numbers or another term:

Foothill, 57, 15, 605, Harbor, Century, etc.

Many roads and freeways in California follow paths going back hundreds of years. El Camino Real=101, roughly following the trail used between the missions, by Fr. Junipero Serra.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jun%C3%ADpero_Serra

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Highway_101

I took the test, and I have a West accent. Native SoCal. OC 60 years. Goldwater and then Reagan land.


140 posted on 10/01/2008 5:56:41 PM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: NavyCanDo

I don’t know if you caught the Ice Road Truckers series on History Channel, but I watched both the first and second seasons of it, and to me, she talks just like the Canadians in that series, and if I recall correctly, most of those Canuks were from British Columbia.


141 posted on 10/01/2008 6:14:52 PM PDT by webschooner (McWhatshisname/Palin 2008 !!)
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To: NavyCanDo

“A great book for those of us who decended from Scots-Irish and those interested in early American history.”

I have read some books about these people, but not his, yet.

I know about the history, and importance. The term “scots-irish” has been broadened in this country, to describe people from northern England, who may or may not have stopped along the way in Ireland.

For example, my grandmother, when asked about her ancestry said: “Oh, I don’t really know for sure. Scots-Irish” I imagine.”

The ancestors which led her to think this way all came from northern England, never set foot in Scotland or Ireland!!

It was a cultural thing. Once here in America, they moved along the same migratory pathways as the “scots-irish.” Lived the same lifestyle.


142 posted on 10/01/2008 6:16:27 PM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: Clemenza
An accent one rarely hears these days is the “Locust Valley Lockjaw” of the old Anglo and Dutch families in the New York area. Think FDR, William F. Buckley, and Thurston Howell.

Good. It sounds like the speaker has a mahogany-panelled library stuffed up his nose. Robin Williams should buy a clue. Only in his case it's not a library...

143 posted on 10/01/2008 6:39:54 PM PDT by Ezekiel (Strange things are afoot at the Circle K.)
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To: truth_seeker

Strange. I wonder what the difference is between a West accent and a Midland accent.

My father once had a Kansas accent, which either the army or my mother broke him of. Apparently it was quite strong.


144 posted on 10/01/2008 6:41:59 PM PDT by NathanR ( Drill here. Drill now. Pay less.)
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To: T-Bird45
sure the hell isn't ebonics...

145 posted on 10/01/2008 6:46:08 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - McCain/Palin'08 = http://www.johnmccain.com/)
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To: T-Bird45

Sounds like a central-Midwestern accent to me: exactly what TV folks try to have.

Meanwhile, I have the “Southern” accent that insntantly knocks 30 points off your IQ in the minds of any damnyankee listening...

Fool ‘em a bunch, I do!


146 posted on 10/01/2008 6:50:31 PM PDT by Redbob (W.W.J.B.D. - "What Would Jack Bauer Do?")
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To: Peelod

Yep - Sarah’s SKOOKUM!


147 posted on 10/01/2008 6:51:51 PM PDT by anniegetyourgun
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To: Clemenza
Think FDR, William F. Buckley, and Thurston Howell.

I heard Steve Forbes the other day and he has a bit of it.

148 posted on 10/01/2008 6:53:08 PM PDT by Right Wing Assault ("..this administration is planning a 'Right Wing Assault' on values and ideals.." - John Kerry)
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To: Madame Dufarge
Any more than a Yankee could fake a Southern accent.

Or any more than a Southerner could fake a Yankee accent.

149 posted on 10/01/2008 6:55:13 PM PDT by Right Wing Assault ("..this administration is planning a 'Right Wing Assault' on values and ideals.." - John Kerry)
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To: LibFreeUSA

its got a little Canadian in it...also, North Dakota....


150 posted on 10/01/2008 6:57:38 PM PDT by cherry
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