Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Stimulus bill to reward Filipino vets
northjersey.com ^ | Tuesday, February 17, 2009 | ELIZABETH LLORENTE

Posted on 02/17/2009 11:02:19 PM PST by Coleus

President Obama's signature today on the stimulus bill will grant Filipino World War II veterans long-awaited recognition and compensation for their service alongside U.S. forces against the Japanese. The measure calls for a one-time lump sum payment of $15,000 for Filipino veterans who are U.S. citizens, and $9,000 for non-citizens. It sets aside $198 million for the veterans. And, in what many Filipino-American organizations say is more important, it recognizes the role they played defending the U.S. flag in the war.

"The recognition is the most important," said Jose Red, an 84-year-old veteran who lives in Jersey City. "We've been working for the recognition for a long, long time. We did this for democracy, for freedom, for the future generations."

Recognition as full-fledged World War II veterans was promised to the Filipinos when they were conscripted into the U.S. Army, with the understanding that they would receive the same benefits as U.S. veterans. But after the war ended, Congress stripped them of their status and their rights to many benefits. "It felt like being told you're a nobody," Red said. "We felt insulted," he added. "We fought side by side with American soldiers."

Of the 200,000 Filipinos who fought alongside U.S. soldiers, fewer than 18,000 are alive today. Some 6,000 are thought to be living in the United States, while the rest live overseas, mostly in the Philippines. About two dozen live in New Jersey, said Red, a founder of the Philippine-American Veterans Organization. Like many measures in the stimulus bill, this one was opposed by congressional members and others who said it does nothing to create jobs or help the U.S. economy.

Sen. Daniel Inouye, a Hawaii Democrat who was the main force behind inclusion of the bid, conceded on the Senate floor that the Filipino compensation measure "doesn't create jobs." But he added, "The honor of the United States — that's what's involved." Filipino-Americans who for years pushed for a measure that would provide both compensation and recognition argued that the provision in the stimulus bill does not allocate new money to the veterans, but rather releases funds that had been set aside in an appropriations bill last year.

"This is not new spending," said Eric Lachica, whose late father was a World War II veteran and who is a volunteer coordinator for American Coalition for Filipino Veterans Inc. "It authorizes the release of the money." Ludi Hughes, a Fair Lawn resident whose father died in 1958 and fought in the war, said she was relieved to see the measure pass, though she also sympathized with those who questioned its inclusion in the stimulus bill.

"It doesn't really help the U.S. economy, and as an American, I understand why people would see it as wrong to make it part of the stimulus bill," Hughes said. "But as a Filipino-American I feel it's about time that these veterans get the compensation and recognition that they've waited so long to get. It's been more than 60 years. It's too long. There aren't even many of them left to get this help."

The provision calls for benefits to be available to such veterans during a one-year period from the date of enactment. It also allows for widows or widowers of claimants to collect benefits. "We're telling people to file as soon as they're eligible," said Lachica. "Many of these veterans are in their 90s. They can't wait."


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; US: New Jersey
KEYWORDS: filipino; stimulusbill; veterans; worldwarii

1 posted on 02/17/2009 11:02:19 PM PST by Coleus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Coleus

One of the few provisions of the bill that I *don’t* have a problem with.


2 posted on 02/17/2009 11:05:22 PM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

I agree with what yer saying but there are, were and will be better ways !


3 posted on 02/17/2009 11:09:10 PM PST by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr
Should have been done a long time ago. Now Obama gets credit for it.

I fear it opens a gate for those far less deserving demanding cash.

Opps, Too late.

4 posted on 02/17/2009 11:12:16 PM PST by oyez (People! You're being pimped!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

I still oppose this on principle. These kind of things need their own bill. The only reason this was attached is to hid the 20 other amendments that are pure pork.


5 posted on 02/17/2009 11:17:55 PM PST by DiogenesLaertius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Squantos

It is better than nothing. At the rate that WW2 vets are dying off, there won’t be much time left to do something even vaguely meaningful.

These men were ours, we should take care of our own.


6 posted on 02/17/2009 11:18:45 PM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: oyez

That gate got blown open years ago.


7 posted on 02/17/2009 11:19:14 PM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

The 2009 Filipino Stimulus Bill


8 posted on 02/17/2009 11:29:50 PM PST by americanophile
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Coleus
About time.
9 posted on 02/17/2009 11:39:09 PM PST by Mojave (Don't blame me. I voted for McClintock.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

Did they get their island back from the Japanese?

Did the Japanese give them a present?

Did France give the US any cheese or wine for saving them?

Do welfare queens and illegal Mexican gangsters give a crap when they collapse an economy?

I am so tired of giving away all of our prosperity to people who got their already.

It’s good to know the vets got something, why not the FILIPINO GOVERNMENT?


10 posted on 02/17/2009 11:50:20 PM PST by wac3rd (In the end, we all are Conservative, some just need their lives jolted to realize that fact.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr
My problem with this "bill" is Obama honors one variant of veteran. Pay em all if they served in the US military IMHO.
11 posted on 02/18/2009 12:01:28 AM PST by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Squantos

I don’t disagree, but some is better than none.

If you want to wait until the Dems agree to pay all, we’ll be on WW VI.


12 posted on 02/18/2009 12:20:22 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd

A surprisingly large number of Filipino troops stayed in the fight until the capitulation of Japan, not just until the liberation of the Philippines.


13 posted on 02/18/2009 12:22:08 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

Bad bill is a bad bill....period ! To put some sugar in it to sell the bulk acidity of it doesn’t make it passable at all IMO.

hope yer well....stay safe !

Nite !


14 posted on 02/18/2009 12:29:25 AM PST by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Squantos

I didn’t say it was a GOOD bill. I just said that I didn’t have a problem with this one provision.

Regardless, this bill should never have seen the light of day and the recognition of service should have been passed years ago.


15 posted on 02/18/2009 12:31:51 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

Again, the Filipino government should pull out its checkbook and pay its gratitude to its soldiers who assisted the Americans in saving their island.

If the Filipinos came to California and saved the US from the Germans and then continued on to Berlin. the US would owe them a nice pension.

I am still confused on why we have are paying them? THEY were occupied by the Japanese, we were allies and liberated them, I know, my two best friends are from the Phillipines...I am just curious why we owe them money?

Have I lost my mind?


16 posted on 02/18/2009 12:31:54 AM PST by wac3rd (In the end, we all are Conservative, some just need their lives jolted to realize that fact.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd

The Filipino government did it’s part for its soldiers decades ago. Until today, and to the best of my knowledge, the US never has.

IMHO, this is less about paying those that helped evict the Japanese and more about paying for all the rescued and protected airmen and soldiers as well as those Filipino troops that tried to keep US troops alive in the Bataan death march and subsequent internment. Review your WW2 history, specifically the Filipino campaigns.


17 posted on 02/18/2009 12:37:17 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd

Oh, and by the way? The Filipinos still honor both Filipino AND US troops who perished in the Bataan Death March every April 9 - it’s a national holiday.

We.... don’t.


18 posted on 02/18/2009 12:39:16 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

My great uncle survived Bataan, thank you. I am very familiar with WW2 history/

They were allies, I am just missing the point of why the US has to pay them?

Makes no sense to me.


19 posted on 02/18/2009 12:41:21 AM PST by wac3rd (In the end, we all are Conservative, some just need their lives jolted to realize that fact.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd

IIRC, many were attached to US units and weren’t being paid.


20 posted on 02/18/2009 12:42:12 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

If that is true, why don’t the British and French pay for US pensions? They honor our dead and give us airspace, but as far as I know, my uncles and grandfather got no check in British pounds or Euros, or even French francs, prior to the conversion...

The Japanese did the invading, why not tax them with war reparations?


21 posted on 02/18/2009 12:44:49 AM PST by wac3rd (In the end, we all are Conservative, some just need their lives jolted to realize that fact.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd

Japan paid reparations - 1 trillion, 30 billion yen, plus individual amounts to countries that did not agree to collective remuneration.

The British pay (or paid) pensions for US citizens who fought in Brit units, and have since the war ended. We didn’t do the same for Filipinos.


22 posted on 02/18/2009 12:50:26 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

Acknowledging those who fought with us is right. But it doesn’t make the porkulus one inch better. It’s shameless windowdressing.


23 posted on 02/18/2009 1:15:22 AM PST by SolidWood (Palin: "In Alaska we eat therefore we hunt.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: SolidWood

No argument. I said as much in a followup post.

Idea = good.
Sticking it in Porkulus to try to make it more appetizing = bad.

Were I in Congress, I would not have voted for it, even with a thousand such provisions.


24 posted on 02/18/2009 1:16:45 AM PST by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

Ok, enough, pay them. Who cares, the golf carts and road to Vegas pet projects dwarf this money.

I was just curious.

I salute those brave men and was unaware the Brits paid us.


25 posted on 02/18/2009 1:20:29 AM PST by wac3rd (In the end, we all are Conservative, some just need their lives jolted to realize that fact.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

Last year the Philippine government sent $500,000.00 to a lobbying firm in Wash, DC. The fee was the price to pay to get the veterans funding.


26 posted on 02/18/2009 1:39:25 AM PST by bushpilot1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

RP signs $500,000 US lobby deal

By Cynthia Balana
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 22:41:00 01/31/2008

Filed Under: Licensing Agreements

MANILA, Philippines — The government has signed a $500,000 (P20 million) lobbying contract with one of Washington D.C.’s more influential law firms to push the country’s interests in the United States, particularly veterans issues in the US Congress, the Philippine embassy in Washington said Thursday.

In his report to the Department of Foreign Affairs in Manila, Ambassador to Washington Willy Gaa said he signed the contract on behalf of the Philippines, while Ambassador Stuart E. Eizenstat signed on behalf of International Practice of Covington & Burling LLP as its chair and partner.

Gaa said the contract, signed on Wednesday, was valid for six months and did not entail additional expense to the Philippine government, such as for travel and representation.

Gaa said the contract-signing was held after both sides had complied with the requirements of Philippine and US laws and after several rounds of discussions.

“Ambassador Eizenstat and his team will provide welcome support to our efforts here in Washington,” said Gaa. “Our consultant and his excellent team will work broadly on a bipartisan basis, particularly in Congress.”

More importantly, Gaa said, their priority remains correcting the grave injustice done to Filipino World War II veterans, referring to the veterans equity bill that is awaiting approval on Capitol Hill.

Gaa said the Philippines remained committed to winning for the “Filipino veterans the benefits, dignity and recognition that they truly deserve.”

Gaa said the embassy would release a copy of the contract after the signed copy had been registered with the US Department of Justice and received officially in the Philippines.

Philippine laws and regulations, particularly Executive Order No. 662-A, require that the contract be submitted to the Procurement Transparency Group under the Government Procurement Policy Board, which is chaired by the secretary of budget and management.

Reports out of Washington said Eizenstat was tapped to push the Philippine political, security and trade agenda on Capitol Hill, the Pentagon and the Department of State.

The Philippines also has consultancy agreements with Burson-Marsteller, as well as Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg to lobby for bigger Philippine garment quotas.


27 posted on 02/18/2009 1:46:02 AM PST by bushpilot1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

The firm’s recent pro bono matters include:

* Former and/or continued representation of fifteen Yemenis, one Pakistani, and one Algerian being held at Guantanamo Bay, and have obtained favorable rulings that detainees have rights under the Fifth Amendment and the Geneva Conventions.[15] The court ruled in March 2005 that the government could not transfer detainees from Guantanamo Bay to foreign custody without first giving the prisoners a chance to challenge the move in court.

* Preparing an amicus brief on behalf of a number of social scientists in the Cook v. Rumsfeld case challenging the military’s don’t ask, don’t tell policy.

* Filing an amicus brief in the United States Supreme Court on behalf of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) in support of the Planned Parenthood challenge of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003.

* Supporting the District of Columbia in District of Columbia v. Heller which argues that the District’s ban on the possession of handguns and its storage provisions for other firearms in the home is not implicated by the Second Amendment.[16]


28 posted on 02/18/2009 1:54:38 AM PST by bushpilot1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

Private practice

Since 2001, Holder has worked as an attorney at Covington & Burling in Washington, D.C.,[


29 posted on 02/18/2009 1:56:50 AM PST by bushpilot1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bushpilot1

Eric Holder


30 posted on 02/18/2009 1:57:54 AM PST by bushpilot1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd
I am just missing the point of why the US has to pay them?

According to the source, because they were members of the US Army, not the Philippine Militia. You do remember that the Philippines was US Territory then?

31 posted on 02/18/2009 2:02:24 AM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla ("men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." -- Edmund Burke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: bushpilot1

Are you under the impression that anyone who gets US Government money does so without lobbying for it? That the Fillipinos had lobbyists goes without saying.


32 posted on 02/18/2009 2:07:29 AM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla ("men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." -- Edmund Burke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Coleus

I can get along with this one.


33 posted on 02/18/2009 2:40:22 AM PST by arthurus ( H.L. Mencken said, "Every election is a sort of advance auction sale of stolen goods.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Spktyr

why in the world is this in a stimulus bill that has to be signed off on immediately? this action happened over 60 years ago.


34 posted on 02/18/2009 5:47:32 AM PST by bestintxas (It's great in Texas)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Lucius Cornelius Sulla

Didn’t know that...


35 posted on 02/18/2009 9:37:18 AM PST by wac3rd (In the end, we all are Conservative, some just need their lives jolted to realize that fact.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: SandRat; ALOHA RONNIE

.


36 posted on 02/18/2009 5:39:31 PM PST by Coleus (Abortion, Euthanasia & FOCA - - don't Obama and the Democrats just kill ya!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd

Yep, the Phillippines was US territory from 1898 to 1948. We were building them for independence when WWII started.


37 posted on 02/19/2009 4:35:06 AM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla ("men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters." -- Edmund Burke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: wac3rd

The answer to your question is simple. The Philippines were a US territory until shortly after WWII. While it is true the Filipino service members were liberating their lands, those lands were a territory of the United States of America, and not an independent nation.


38 posted on 02/23/2009 11:24:02 PM PST by backtothestreets
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson