Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Victor Davis Hanson: Thoughts About Depressed Americans
pajamasmedia.com ^ | March 20, 2009 | Victor Davis Hanson

Posted on 03/24/2009 7:45:58 AM PDT by Tolik

Why are so many Americans so depressed about things these days? It is perhaps not just the economy.

 I think the answer is clear: all the accustomed referents, the sources of security, of knowledge and reassurance appear to be vanishing. Materially, we still enjoy a sumptuous lifestyle in comparison with past generations—and the world outside our borders. America remains the most sane and successful society on the planet.

But there is a strange foreboding, a deer-in-the-headlights look to us that we may be clueless Greeks in the age of Demosthenes, played-out Romans around AD 450, or give-up French in late 1939—with a sense it cannot go on. Why? Let us count the ways.

1)   About Broke. The collective debt is simply staggering, $1.7 trillion in borrowing this year alone. $3.5 trillion is our annual budget, and by 2012 what we all owe will be well over $15-17 trillion. (No fears: the President promises to triple the Bush deficit, but by the end of his “first” term “halve” the deficit, as if tripling and then halving it is not increasing it.)

Today while President Obama railed against AIG bonuses (imagine damning the bonuses you signed into law to the execs from whom you took over $100,000 in campaign donations!)—the congressional budget office “found” another trillion or so dollars in anticipated deficits that Team Obama lost.

So after Obama, the next President will campaign on “I promise a $1 trillion annual surplus for eight years to pay off the last eight, so we can then start over paying off the old $11 trillion shortfall.”

The rub is not just that we are inflating—no, ruining—our currency. And the problem is still more than the fact that we are destroying the lives of the next generation, whose collective budgets will be consumed largely with health care for us baby-boomers, and interest payments on our debts. (If I get to be 87, can we keep asking 500 or so Chinese to put off false teeth to lend me their money for a hip replacement?)

I think instead the worst element is a sort of ill-feeling about ourselves, an unhappiness as we look in the mirror and see what we are doing to our dignity in this, the hour of our crisis.

We are starting to fathom that when times got iffy, we lacked the resilience of the proverbial Joads and the grit of that tough Depression-era generation, and certainly we seem different sorts from those who built and flew B-17s amid the Luftwaffe.

Instead, this generation has gone quite stark raving mad the last seven months, hysterical, and decided we would simply borrow, charge it, print money, blame, accuse—almost anything other than roll up our sleeves, take a cut in our standard of living, pay off what we owe, admit  that we lived too high on the hog, and find a certain nobility in shared sacrifice.

So again, here we are reduced to begging the Chinese to subsidize our life-styles, while 500 million of their own poor make their American counterparts of the lower classes here seem like well-heeled grandees.

2) Fides? We have almost destroyed the concept of trust: we don’t think there is any accuracy in AIG statements; don’t really believe GM will make it on its own,  or that Goldman-Sachs is honestly run.

All our icons—Ford, General Electric, Citibank, Bank of America—in a mere generation imploded by their own hands, and now we don’t have any real idea of what went wrong, and believe their captains don’t either.

When Barack Obama says the economy will soon grow at a 4.6 annual rate, I simply don’t believe him. I don’t believe Sec. Geithner’s reconstruction of when he knew about the AIG bonuses, or that he simply forgot to pay his payroll taxes.

If  Chris Dodd were to say that gravity exists, I could be sure we would float into the stratosphere. If Barack Obama said he was against renditions, I’d assume he had merely renamed them “transfers.” I do know that as we run up more trillions in debt the next four years, Obama will be in perpetual campaign mode with the same tired mantra “The Bush deficit mess I inherited” to screaming and adoring crowds.

3.) A Certain Coarseness. We also are wearied by a certain crassness in American society in ways we have not seen before—or at least since the mid-19th century. Sorry, I don’t want my President joshing about the Special Olympics on Leno. I don’t want him on Leno at all in his perpetual PR mode. I don’t want him drawing  out his picks for the final four on TV. I don’t want him paid for rewriting/revising/ condensing/whatever his earlier book while he’s supposed to be President, or ribbing Gordon Brown about his tennis game in patronizing fashion, or giving the British a pack of un-viewable DVDs after they, in exchange, offered a tasteful gift of historic importance.

I was always an advocate of informality, of casualness, but now when on a plane, in a restaurant, at Starbucks, I am struck by the rare well-dressed person who does not crowd. How odd the extra-polite woman, who conducts herself with charm and grace at the counter, or the gentleman who opens doors, says excuse me, and whose intelligent conversation I enjoy listening in on—like a dew drop to someone thirsting in the desert. In contrast, when the punk walks by, with radio blaring, mumbling obscenities, flashing the ‘I’ll kill you’ stare,” it all leaves me in depression.

Worse still, on the opposite end of the scale, is the master of the universe who elbows his way onto a plane while he blares on the telephone and blocks the aisle. I feel creepy after walking through an electronics store and seeing some of the video game titles and covers.

 In short, I don’t want to hear any more Viagra or Cialis ads, no more douche commercials—please no more talking heads about penises that are enlarging, hardening, stimulated on the public air waves.

The sum of these foul parts is smothering us. I don’t want to know that there is a new sex clinic opening in Fresno, or hear another ad about how I can skip out on my credit card debt, or that some sort of food is stuck to my intestinal walls like spackle and paste unless I buy some gut cleansing product.

At some point, we need to say enough is enough, and try to find some sense of honor and decorum in these times of crisis. My god, the entire country has become some sort of Rousseauian nightmare, as if the Berkeley Free Speech Area circa 1970 is now the public domain, as if the culture of the Folsom cell block is now the national ethos.

4) What is good/bad? We are depressed and listless and angry also because I think that we fear we have lost all sense of calibration. We can’t tell what is good and what is god-awful. Where does a Paris Hilton or Britney Spears come from? What can they do? What determines a modern poem’s line break?

Is there any transcendence in the rap album of the month? A Marxist folk singer like old Peter Seeger always had more talent in his little finger than the sum total of Madonna. How did a modern-day Cleon like Barney Frank become the national spokesman of populist outrage against Wall Street.

One, just one, novel of a Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe even, is worth more than what has been written collectively in the last ten years. T. S. Eliot in a day could write better poetry than what has been composed in all the creative writing departments in the United States over the last twenty years—and we are going to give more billions under Obama to “education.”

At some point, again, we need to establish criteria of excellence, regardless of ideology, politics, or of fashion. We honor actors like De Niro and Pacino because we instinctively feel they are talented and are at least shadows of the old breed; a David Petraeus seems like a Matthew Ridgway come to save us in Korea.

We yearn for an ex-President Truman or Eisenhower—and instead get Jimmy Carter. David McCullough sells books because he is talented, can tell a story, is reliable, has a sense of what is the essence of history—and won’t lecture us about his own agenda at a conference on transvestites in the Union Army. I allow that a perpetual adolescent Sean Penn can act (sort of), but a Jack Palance or Richard Boone of the second-tier could exhibit more stage presence, more auctoritas in a split second of exposure than Penn could achieve in a month at the dais.

(5) Yes/No/Sorta/Maybe We sense we are trimmers and redistributors, and wouldn’t dare build a new dam a transcontinental railroad, a new 8 -lane freeway.

Instead we would sue, file reports, argue, quit, delay—anything other than conceive a majestic idea and finish it, sighing, “It is not perfect, but damn good enough and will do.” Instead, here in California we are simply destroying agriculture by drying up its sources of water-giving life—a once brilliant farming that was the sum total of millions of brave lives from 1880 to 2000 who took a desert and fed the world.

Instead, ensconced in the Berkeley Hills or Woodside, our elites demand of better others to save for them not people, but a smelt, a minnow, or a newt-like creature that must have the  entire Kings or San Joaquin River as it dumps its precious cargo out to sea.

So as scare snow melts, it goes out to the ocean, gratifying a lawyer or professor in Palo Alto that rivers flow as they did in the 19th-century, as millions of acres go fallow, hundreds of thousands lose jobs, and we feel so morally superior to those of the past who really were our moral superiors.

It is easy to dismiss our ancestors as illiberal, or with the caveat “Oh, but if we were as poor as they were, we’d have to prove just as tough”, but we still sense they were different in the sense of far better. When I drive up to see those Sierra dams poured in the 1920s, one wonders how they made such things with only primitive machines, and in contrast, are amazed with our sophisticated tools, we do so much less. 

This self-congratulatory generation can hardly, as we are learning, build a Bay Bridge again. Yet when we see on the Internet pictures of a new aircraft carrier we are stunned in amazement—we did that? We built such a powerful, sophisticated ship? We—at least someone— can actually still do things on rare occasion like that?

The American people are, to be frank, nauseated by the archetype of a John Edwards, who never created anything other than a legacy of bankrupting doctors in order to enrich himself.  I’d prefer one gall bladder surgeon to fifty Botox experts, a good Perkins engine mechanic to 1,000 deconstructionists at the MLA, one competent chemist to fifty government attorneys.

For the present I think that we have enough social service bureaucrats, enough consultants, enough PhDs that will lecture  how race/class/gender has made us, our air, our dogs even, so unfair. We simply are thirsty for the unapologetic doer, who never says he’s sorry for himself or his country or his ancestors, but instead thinks and plans how he can build something better and leave it for others–the age old agrarian commandment “make sure you leave a better farm than you inherit.” Where are they all, in the grave?

We all seem to stare at the rare genius under a semi, working on the transmission, or someone on a catwalk riveting a girder, or a teacher who can wade into an unruly class and say “damn it, we are going to learn calculus one way or another”.

My complaint against Hollywood actors is not that they are talentless, though many are; or that they talk in the same tones as women did sixty years ago, but that they have no imprint, no trademark of individuality. In short, to paraphrase Orwell, “If it paid better, they’d be fascists.”

I think we responded to Mickey Rourke’s brief renaissance, not because he survived while being drug-addled, or was punched out, or reckless, but because he showed, as a torn-cat, a certain dignity, a certain courage of being so very different from the norm. Yes, at this point we are so desperate for talent and singularity we will take eccentricity bordering on nihilism.  

So there you have this rant.

Why are Americans hesitant, bewildered after the arrival of the Messiah?

Not for the reason our President attests about high unemployment or shaky GDP or the lack of national health care.  We simply are ashamed of our profligacy; we don’t trust those who should be trusted; we put up with the crass and honor the mediocre and ugly; and we fight and bicker over the distribution, never over a share in the creation.

Hope and change, indeed.


TOPICS: Editorial; Front Page News
KEYWORDS: vdh; victordavishanson
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-66 next last

1 posted on 03/24/2009 7:45:59 AM PDT by Tolik
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: neverdem; Lando Lincoln; quidnunc; .cnI redruM; SJackson; dennisw; monkeyshine; Alouette; ...


    Victor Davis Hanson Ping ! 

       Let me know if you want in or out.

Links:    FR Index of his articles:  http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/keyword?k=victordavishanson
                His website: http://victorhanson.com/
                NRO archive: http://www.nationalreview.com/hanson/hanson-archive.asp
                Pajamasmedia:
   http://victordavishanson.pajamasmedia.com/

2 posted on 03/24/2009 7:46:34 AM PDT by Tolik
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

This is how the Dark Ages began.


3 posted on 03/24/2009 7:48:51 AM PDT by Crawdad (If you're in a fair fight, your tactics suck.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

I don’t see that Ford or GE have imploded—not yet anyway, and Ford shows every sign of surviving now—but otherwise a superb rant.

First rate.


4 posted on 03/24/2009 7:53:40 AM PDT by Petronski (For the next few years, Gethsemane will not be marginal. We will know that garden. -- Cdl. Stafford)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
>What determines a modern poem’s line break?


Modern poetry?
Where the hell would anyone
see poems these days?!

5 posted on 03/24/2009 7:53:57 AM PDT by theFIRMbss
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

ping


6 posted on 03/24/2009 7:54:11 AM PDT by unkus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

Great rant/article. VDH is right. The corruption of standards, morality, and ultimately language has worn us out.


7 posted on 03/24/2009 7:54:48 AM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (Mr. Bernanke, have you started working on your book about the second GREATER depression?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

I’m on the verge of depression because I see my country going down the drain and recognize that over half of it’s inhabitants don’t have a clue.


8 posted on 03/24/2009 7:55:21 AM PDT by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
I do know that as we run up more trillions in debt the next four years, Obama will be in perpetual campaign mode with the same tired mantra “The Bush deficit mess I inherited” to screaming and adoring crowds.

Those crowds will no doubt, as I saw late last week, be chanting "O-BA-MA O-BA-MA" to their political leader in a fit of oblivious fascist euphoria entirely unrecognized by a generation educated by the NEA.

9 posted on 03/24/2009 7:56:58 AM PDT by Petronski (For the next few years, Gethsemane will not be marginal. We will know that garden. -- Cdl. Stafford)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

Wow.... that was powerful!


10 posted on 03/24/2009 7:57:39 AM PDT by Patriotic1 (Dic mihi solum facta, domina - Just the facts, ma'am)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

Well done, Victor.


11 posted on 03/24/2009 8:01:12 AM PDT by ponygirl ("Do not let anything into your body or into your heart that will damage your faith.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

This sounds like the national malaise coming back. Once can only hope that morning in America is not far behind.


12 posted on 03/24/2009 8:01:30 AM PDT by rhombus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All
http://corner.nationalreview.com/post/?q=NDNkZDEwNDI1MTUzOTY2ZDcyZGQ3ZjAzZjllOWViN2I=
Monday, March 23, 2009

Cry, the Beloved Republic   [Victor Davis Hanson]

Forget Halliburton, Enron, etc. — AIG is the metaphor of our new century. Let's get this straight: Our president takes over $100,000 from AIG in campaign donations. Then he signs into legislation a bill crafted by his own party, with input from his own Treasury secretary, giving mega-bonuses to the execs of this bankrupt, federally bailed-out company — and then goes on the stump to trash the culture of Wall Street as typified by . . . AIG, of course.

Not to be outdone, Senator Dodd denies he put the AIG bonus provision in the bill, then — in a now familiar Obama administration habit — coughs up the truth that he in fact did when the evidence no longer allows him to prevaricate as is his wont. He, like our president, then goes the demagogic route, blasting the Wall Street placenta which nourished him through discounted mortgages, Irish cottages, and Fannie Mae cash — and, yes, like our president with over $100,000 in AIG cash.

We haven't heard from Representative Rangel recently. And why should we, given the failure of the House Ways and Means Committee chairman who oversees tax policy to pay proper taxes on unreported income, Rangel's serial abuse of rent-subsidized apartments, and his shake-down of corporations for money for his "Charles B. Rangel Center for Public Service at the City College of New York" — and, of course, his efforts to get millions from AIG and/or its execs for his eponymous "Center"? (Should we laugh or cry that it is to be a center devoted to  "public service"?) But, as in the case of Dodd and Obama, those with the most AIG money in their pockets are usually the ones calling loudest for others' scalps. So ethicist Rangel now uses his position to post facto rewrite tax laws to get back the money from AIG that his party approved, his president signed into law, and he himself used to out-elbow others for.

But all this is not the real shamelessness. As it transpires, we witness a Pravda-like media, that used to evoke Enron at every juncture, now either stay mum, or, worse, write these pathetic, scratch-your-head op-eds about how odd it is that the Chicago-organizing, Reverend Wright devotee, three-years in the Senate veteran would be presiding over all this sleaze.

At least by 2016, we can anticipate what the campaign slogans for the anti-Obama opposition will be: "I promise to ensure eight years of $1.5 trillion dollar budget surpluses so that the American people can get the national debt back to a manageable $11 trillion of 2008."

03/23 08:54 AM


13 posted on 03/24/2009 8:01:56 AM PDT by Tolik
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

The big issues are always around, but the declining civility is most troublesome. Nothing grows out of ashes.


14 posted on 03/24/2009 8:02:36 AM PDT by Professor_Leonide (I said to the young man who showed me a photo, "Who can ever be sure what is behind a mask?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

I know I am depressed about what is happening to our country.
I have seen where Mark Levin and Dick Morris have put on weight since Obamanation and so have I.
OBAMA IS MAKING US FAT!!!!!!!
Get him out.


15 posted on 03/24/2009 8:02:46 AM PDT by sweetiepiezer (I have a Pal in Sarah)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

This man is brilliant.


16 posted on 03/24/2009 8:04:17 AM PDT by JamesP81 (When Obama signed an order providing tax dollars to murder children, he stopped being my president)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
The answer in one word: decadence.

We are victims of our own wealth -- as a society we've learned to live with it, and to value it, but not to produce it.

17 posted on 03/24/2009 8:08:58 AM PDT by r9etb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Just another Joe
I’m on the verge of depression because I see my country going down the drain and recognize that over half of it’s inhabitants don’t have a clue.

Ditto...VDH nails it again.

18 posted on 03/24/2009 8:09:17 AM PDT by Wyatt's Torch (I can explain it to you. I can't understand it for you.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
Great article.
19 posted on 03/24/2009 8:10:06 AM PDT by ishmac ("There are no permanent defeats in politics because there are no permanent victories." Lady Thatcher)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Professor_Leonide

Bump that.


20 posted on 03/24/2009 8:10:19 AM PDT by ecomcon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: cgk

*ping* to the best rant of the year.


21 posted on 03/24/2009 8:10:22 AM PDT by WhistlingPastTheGraveyard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sweetiepiezer

Mark Levin has heart problems too I think.


22 posted on 03/24/2009 8:17:27 AM PDT by beaversmom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

“...So there you have this rant...”

It is not a rant. Everything he says is measured, logical and TRUE.


23 posted on 03/24/2009 8:17:55 AM PDT by PGR88
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

bookmarked.


24 posted on 03/24/2009 8:22:39 AM PDT by Chuzzlewit
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
... budgets will be consumed largely with health care for us baby-boomers, ...

Not necessarily. It becomes easier and easier to ... well, to remove the inconvenient among us.

Eliminating the most burdensome would eliminate a lot of debt. Any accumulations they might have left at this point in their 'lives' could simply become government property.

25 posted on 03/24/2009 8:27:01 AM PDT by RobinOfKingston (Democrats, the party of evil. Republicans, the party of stupid.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

Great rant!


26 posted on 03/24/2009 8:36:12 AM PDT by rockrr (Global warming is to science what Islam is to religion)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

We are depressed because there is no leadership in the opposition.

The left will always run all over everything when they are ‘home alone’.

What do you expect?

The Republican party is a vacillating, leaderless collection of shadow people.


27 posted on 03/24/2009 8:36:14 AM PDT by squarebarb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

correcting things to the old ways—

does this mean we can’t look at megyn kelly’s legs in the morning?


28 posted on 03/24/2009 8:47:09 AM PDT by ken21 (the only thing we have to fear is fdr deja vu.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

Without a vision the people perish.

We have no leaders. Our national moral compass is broken and we are told we have no need to fix it. Therefore, chaos and it’s cousin, depression, follow.

When a leader begins to emerge, or if attempts are made to recalibrate our national moral compass we get a godless bloodletting from people demanding that we leave them alone and not impinge upon them in any way.

Frustration from a sense of total helplessness to make obvious course corrections results. Greater chaos naturally follows as a deeper national depression sets in, and the decent into depravity spins just a little faster now.


29 posted on 03/24/2009 8:47:33 AM PDT by Obadiah (Party - my house - on December 22, 2012!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

self ping for later...


30 posted on 03/24/2009 8:52:53 AM PDT by CharlieOK1 (Don't blame me, I voted for Sarah)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
Victor is brilliant.
31 posted on 03/24/2009 8:58:04 AM PDT by afnamvet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: theFIRMbss

The Cat,
Sat.

Surely one doesn’t believe that the product of modern education(sic) can do much more?


32 posted on 03/24/2009 9:16:22 AM PDT by bill1952 (Power is an illusion created between those with power - and those without)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Attention Surplus Disorder

I think a lot of people would disagree about (3) and (4), which reveal old-fogeyism more than any insights into today’s culture. Middle-aged and older people have been filing similar complaints about society and the younger generation since the dawn of history.


33 posted on 03/24/2009 9:18:14 AM PDT by AnotherUnixGeek
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ken21

>does this mean we can’t look at megyn kelly’s legs in the morning?

perish the thought!


34 posted on 03/24/2009 9:18:19 AM PDT by bill1952 (Power is an illusion created between those with power - and those without)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: RobinOfKingston
>It becomes easier and easier to ... well, to remove the inconvenient among us.

The control and rationing of health-care will do exactly that.

As far as “accumulations,” those are already virtually seized as death or inheritance taxation.

Die broke. - and your last check should bounce!

35 posted on 03/24/2009 9:21:04 AM PDT by bill1952 (Power is an illusion created between those with power - and those without)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

I’m not a “Rand-ian” but this sounds like it ccame right out of Atlas Shrugged!. Ever since the ‘60s, and perhaps even before, the products of the grand doers of our society have been ridiculed or shamed, rather than honored. We’ve decided that science is bad, and feelings good. Our heroes are those who tear down society, or the “bad corporations” rather than the doers of great things or protectors of society. Scientists and engineers are only heroes if their opinions bring down man, rather than enhancing and enabling him. Advancing the human condition is bad, yanking it back further toward medieval or earlier lifestyles is good.


36 posted on 03/24/2009 9:25:30 AM PDT by Mr Inviso
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AnotherUnixGeek
I think a lot of people would disagree about (3) and (4), which reveal old-fogeyism more than any insights into today’s culture

I want to agree with you on that, but sadly, I cannot.

One, just one, novel of a Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe even, is worth more than what has been written collectively in the last ten years.

T. S. Eliot in a day could write better poetry than what has been composed in all the creative writing departments in the United States over the last twenty years—and we are going to give more billions under Obama to “education.”

That (coffin)nailed it.


And America expects what from the NEA agenda and the American educational system? (sic)

To teach math, science, reading, writing, and the pride and dignity of the values of Western civilization and America’s stunning achievements in the world?

Nope. Its all multicultural diversity training and the loving embrace of every perverted and disgusting habit of man.

Sorry, students haven’t gone through twelve years of public school for nothing.
They’ve learned one thing and perhaps only one thing during those twelve years.
They’ve forgotten their algebra, they’ve grown to fear and resent literature, they write like they’ve been lobotomized, but Jesus, can they follow orders!

Students don’t ask that orders make sense because they gave up expecting things to make sense long before they left elementary school.

Things are true because the teacher says they’re true.
Outside class, things are true to your tongue, your fingers, your stomach, your heart.
Inside class, things are true by reason of authority, and that’s just fine because you don’t care anyway.

Miss Wiedemeyer tells you a noun is a person, place or thing, so let it be. You don’t give a rat’s ass; she doesn’t give a rat’s ass.

The only important thing is to please her, and that lesson follows right through College. - cooperate and graduate as your professors tear down everthing good and noble in American history to replace it with their "agenda for change."

Back in kindergarten, you found out that teachers only love children who stand in nice straight lines.

And that’s where it’s been at ever since.

Nothing changes except to get worse, as those students now vote as they are ordered to vote, and believe what the MSM tells them to believe.

The Matrix is here.

A great job of ruining America by the NEA and the public education system.

37 posted on 03/24/2009 9:31:01 AM PDT by bill1952 (Power is an illusion created between those with power - and those without)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: AnotherUnixGeek
Yeah, I'd agree. I'd comment that the subtle difference today and through history is society's propensity on any given day or in any given era to either push limits vs uphold standards.

In some eras, there have been the propensities to seriously attack and attempt to devastate standards. 20th Century music, for just one quick example, atttempted to overthrow traditional music and harmonies. The result? Atonal music, which you either like or dislike, but you have the choice whether to listen to it or not. Fine.

But when the standards being overthrown are those of behaviors which impinge upon the rights and freedoms of others...that's where the revolution becomes threatening (to some) And sure, the civil rights movement made (true) racists and bigots very uncomfortable. It is that type of reactionary discomfort the left ascribes to Conservatives when we're called "haters" and "neanderthals". The point being that the standards being imposed are either arbitrary, or, are those that folks can look up in our founding documents.

So, it begins when I can't drive down the street without 120 db of bass vibration shaking the pavement next to me. And then it continues to higher and higher degrees of impingement until actual rights of the disinterested are rescinded and behaviors are distated. (I'm not attempting to be comprehensive here with this post because I'm sort of distracted by current events around here)

But it's the lack of consideration for others that IMO VDHG is decrying, the idea that anything new and improved is worth shoving in anyone else's face because whatever standard is being used at the moment has to be attacked. In the past; it wasn't forced down out throats; we could take it or leave it. Now it's get with the program or find yourself the subject of a tax audit or an ACORN-arranged mob circling your home.

38 posted on 03/24/2009 9:36:40 AM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (Mr. Bernanke, have you started working on your book about the second GREATER depression?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
Everything is amazing, and nobody is happy
39 posted on 03/24/2009 10:06:36 AM PDT by Dr.Deth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: theFIRMbss

In the third stall...


40 posted on 03/24/2009 10:56:27 AM PDT by Cyber Ninja (His legacy is a stain OnTheDress)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: AnotherUnixGeek
I think a lot of people would disagree about (3) and (4), which reveal old-fogeyism more than any insights into today’s culture.

Only an old fogey even uses a term like "old fogey" anymore. The current proper nomenclature is "Old A** Muthaf******"... usually with a couple of random, unrelated, misspelled words (usually with numbers in the place of vowels) worked in there for seasoning.

When I look at the current generation, it's clear to me that all the "old fogeys" that came before us were right... we really were going to hell. And now we've arrived.

If you need any real insight into todays culture, check out Chuck E. Cheese on pole-dancing night when they're giving away Lil' Wayne CD's.

41 posted on 03/24/2009 11:10:38 AM PDT by WhistlingPastTheGraveyard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: bill1952

If you go look at a high school textbook from say 1910, it’s unbelievable. Greek, Latin, classic literature; calculus. I’m not necessarily saying this is an essential part of a typical education program, but the level of study is orders of magnitude beyond what is taught today.


42 posted on 03/24/2009 11:36:27 AM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (Mr. Bernanke, have you started working on your book about the second GREATER depression?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Tolik; Jim Robinson
I stand in awe.

Jim, can we have this posted next to the "mission statement" for Free Republic?

...please??

Cheers!

43 posted on 03/24/2009 6:43:37 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Attention Surplus Disorder
Please forward me a reference.

My wife is interested in this kind of thing...

Cheers!

44 posted on 03/24/2009 6:46:20 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

BTTT


45 posted on 03/24/2009 6:50:57 PM PDT by spodefly (This is my tag line. There are many like it, but this one is mine.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

Simple version...we are demoralized.


46 posted on 03/24/2009 6:57:14 PM PDT by Earthdweller (Socialism makes you feel better about oppressing people.....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

wow. He really is depressed. I’ve never heard him so negative.


47 posted on 03/24/2009 8:30:55 PM PDT by dervish (most terrifying words in the English language "I'm from the government and I'm here to help" Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AnotherUnixGeek

I’ll cede #3 but #4 goes to the essence of multiculturalism and values. If that’s “old-fogeyism” then the West is death bound.


48 posted on 03/24/2009 8:54:17 PM PDT by dervish (most terrifying words in the English language "I'm from the government and I'm here to help" Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Tolik
Once again, VDH cuts through the many layers of nuance right down to the bone. He really has his hand on the pulse of America. It's really hard to say when this all started. It certainly wasn't seven months ago but the financial crisis has really brought every thing out in the open. I would call it a collective crisis of confidence that we are experiencing as a society. Hanson is dead on in his observations. I just wish more people in Washington and on Main St. understood the extent of the decay and took affirmative action to correct it.
49 posted on 03/25/2009 2:59:21 AM PDT by RU88 (The false messiah can not change water into wine any more than he can get unity from diversity.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Tolik

3.) A Certain Coarseness. We also are wearied by a certain crassness in American society in ways we have not seen before—or at least since the mid-19th century”
* * * * *

I was temporarily buoyed by the people I encountered at the book signing of Levin’s book. Several thousand folks, all bright, articulate, friendly, civilized, well behaved, polite, earnest and motivated.

What a breath of fresh air that was!


50 posted on 03/25/2009 3:10:23 AM PDT by Canedawg (Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-66 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson