Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Why Federal Workers Deserve What They're Paid
The Washington Post ^ | February 3, 2010 | Joe Davidson

Posted on 02/03/2010 7:26:09 AM PST by Poundstone

Excerpt: The budget answers critics, including Scott Brown, the newly elected Republican senator from Massachusetts, who say federal civilians earn much more than private-sector workers. There's a reason for that. Federal workers are better educated.

"The Federal Government hires lawyers to tackle corruption, security professionals to monitor our borders, doctors to care for our injured veterans, and world-class scientists to combat deadly diseases such as cancer," the budget says. "Because of these vital needs, the Federal Government hires a relatively highly educated workforce, resulting in higher average pay."

Consider these stats: Twenty percent of federal workers have a master's, professional or doctorate degree, compared with 13 percent in the private sector. Fifty-one percent of federal employees have a college degree of some sort, but only 35 percent do in the private sector.

Frankie and Flo may not be smarter than other folks, but they do have more schooling, and they get paid accordingly. They are also substantially older, and that contributes to higher pay -- 46 percent of federal employees are 50 or older, compared with 31 percent of private-sector workers.

Although the section doesn't say so, comparing overall federal and private-sector pay is misleading in another way, because Uncle Sam doesn't employ many people at the bottom of the wage scale the way industry does.

Job-for-job comparisons tell a completely different story. In fact, government figures indicate that federal employees are underpaid by 26 percent compared with their counterparts in similar position in the business world.

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtonpost.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: employees; federal; federalemployees; government
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-200 ... 251-270 next last
To: Poundstone

Questions:

Does there need to be 1 employee of the Department of Agriculture for every 25 farmers in the United States?

Do we need 4,000 people at the Department of Education when the Department shouldn’t exist in the first place?

Can’t you merge several agencies into one eliminating thousands of jobs? Right off the top of my head merge HUD and HHS. Merge Agriculture, Transportation, Energy and Commerce.

Why does the executive branch require 30,000 employees including 1,000 not even in DC?

Why does the State Department require 12,000 of their 15,000 employees to be in DC instead of overseas?

Why do 535 members of Congress require 30,000 federal employees?

Why does NASA need 4,000 people in Washington DC?

Employee Counts: http://www.bls.gov/oco/cg/cgs041.htm

Farm counts: http://www.epa.gov/oecaagct/ag101/demographics.html


51 posted on 02/03/2010 7:52:11 AM PST by PittsburghAfterDark
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DonaldC
That is basically what I have done, except a bit backwards, own business first nor fed employee, and it is for that exact reason. I started a family late in life and the stability and schedule is nice. I paid my dues early on and give the taxpayers a good days work even now.

Of course I am a Conservative and in federal service so my perspective is different in that regard, I know whom I owe my efforts to, I was and still am one of them.

52 posted on 02/03/2010 7:52:18 AM PST by ejonesie22
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

IMO government workers are basically bureaucrats who are good at one thing: Following directions. There’s very little innovation. Follow the script. If x does this than do that. If y is filled out then send them to p. It’s like this because there’s no motive need to be efficient or to do things different. Your actions never impact the bottom line. Put these same workers in a real world situation where they’re being evaluated on creativity, originality and running a lean, happy department and they’re lost. They can’t compete.


53 posted on 02/03/2010 7:52:18 AM PST by DouglasKC
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mbs6
I’m guessing that many of these highly educated federal employees hold degrees in fuzzy studies which don’t pay in the free market.

Wonder how many hold degrees in "black studies," and "womens' studies."

54 posted on 02/03/2010 7:52:27 AM PST by from occupied ga (Your most dangerous enemy is your own government,)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

I am a retired federal human resources director. Qualifications for professional jobs in government generally require a college education in a specialized field. Having said that, there are many highly educated, specialized federal workers who devote themselves to non-sensical bureaucratic tasks and/or are just lazy. Best thing that could happen to the federal government is fewer inducements for careerism with a healthy dose of private sector experience.

The article is a strawman.


55 posted on 02/03/2010 7:52:40 AM PST by yetidog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mbs6

“Education alone does not determine a person’s earnings potential...”

I dunno, I’ve interviewed graduate level people before and nearly all of them felt that having those pieces of paper entitled them to something better.


56 posted on 02/03/2010 7:54:44 AM PST by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: mbs6
At the moment most of the openings in federal government jobs in the DC area are for engineers, accountants, lawyers, CPAs, computer systems analysts, etc.

Those are hardly fuzzy areas.

This is one of the reasons Northern Virginia's Thomas Jefferson High School is DOMINATING the National Science Foundation's competiton.

I'm just guessing that you think the Department of Education is the big employer her. With the Pentagon just down the road I don't think so.

57 posted on 02/03/2010 7:54:44 AM PST by muawiyah ("Git Out The Way")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: skeeter
90% salary pension for 25 years of work? What federal government are you talking about? Not the U.S. federal government.

On the current retirement plan a federal employee would only receive 25% of the average of his high three years, and I'm not sure if you qualify for retirement that early. On the old retirement plan you would get 46.2%, but there are very few people left on that plan.

On the accelerated law enforcement scale 25 years would qualify for retirement at 39% of the high three years.

I have seen teacher retirement scales that hit 90% for 25 years of work, but not federal employees.

58 posted on 02/03/2010 7:55:07 AM PST by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

Years of institutionalization don’t equal “education”, nor do degrees - nor are all degrees equal within the same specialty or across specialties.

Nobody in his right mind would think, for example, that the average VA doctor is as competent as the average private practice doctor (unless you have never dealt with the VA).

I would also point out that graduate degrees in areas such as “education” and anything with a “studies” in the name have a negative value and are warning signs of credulous minds stuffed with things that aren’t true. Government abounds with these people who produce negative value added. A high school student with good CAD skills or a Microsoft certification is more “educated” that any of these people, if we are looking at education as meaning the ability to add value.

Moreover, the value of someone’s effort depends on how it is used. Even a great legal mind drafting regulations to implement Barney Frank’s plans for “affordable” housing is producing negative value.

The article is just propaganda to justify high salaries and benefits for government drone work.


59 posted on 02/03/2010 7:55:15 AM PST by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

They hire contractors to do the brunt of the work, then take the credit. I have seen this on numerous projects.


60 posted on 02/03/2010 7:55:26 AM PST by Garvin (When it comes to my freedom, there will be no debate. There will be a fight)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RicocheT

With federal, state, and local government workers, about 1/4 could be die at their desks and no one would notice until quitting time.


61 posted on 02/03/2010 7:55:40 AM PST by flowerplough ( Pennsylvania today - New New Jersey meets North West Virginia.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: yetidog
Your typical federal personnel type let's the operating division managers slide when it comes to enforcing the "college level education" requirements listed in the job posting.

A little backbone on the part of those people would go a long way toward fixing that little problem.

62 posted on 02/03/2010 7:56:36 AM PST by muawiyah ("Git Out The Way")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 55 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone
Excerpt: The budget answers critics, including Scott Brown, the newly elected Republican senator from Massachusetts, who say federal civilians earn much more than private-sector workers. There's a reason for that. Federal workers are better educated.... Twenty percent of federal workers have a master's, professional or doctorate degree, compared with 13 percent in the private sector. Fifty-one percent of federal employees have a college degree of some sort, but only 35 percent do in the private sector.

Yay.

The Federal Government -- AKA, the intrinsically-bankrupt, counterproductive, wealth-destroying Vampire Sector of the Economy -- is siphoning off much of society's intellectual capital, bidding educated professionals away from employment in productive endeavors.

Everybody celebrate.

63 posted on 02/03/2010 7:57:21 AM PST by Christian_Capitalist
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno

BS indeed.

Job Growth Lacking in the Private Sector (over the last decade)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/08/business/economy/08charts.html

Despite budget cuts and layoff warnings, California still hiring and workforce still growing
http://www.sacbee.com/politics/story/2094403.html
The Sacramento Bee
Aug. 9, 2009
State job number on upswing despite recession
By George Avalos
California’s state government has managed to add thousands of jobs
during this past year, defying a mammoth budget deficit and a brutal
recession.
The job growth for state workers contrasts with the loss of 759,000
jobs in California’s private industry in the past 12 months
&http://www.mercurynews.com/topstories/ci_12984385?nclick_check=1&forced=true

Reform advocates are spotlighting those with extravagant pensions
— $100,000 or more — as a way to get the public’s attention and
emphasize that the current system is unsustainable.
http://www.modbee.com/editorials/story/803636.html

Perhaps the real reason why public-sector pension costs have not been tackled is that the full bill has never been revealed to taxpayers.
http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=13988606
From The Economist print edition
July 9, 2009
EDITORIAL
Dodging the bill
The great public-sector pension rip-off
JOIN a private-sector company these days and you will be very lucky if you get a pension linked to your final salary. In Britain almost three out of four companies that retain such schemes have closed them to new employees. The cost of paying such benefits, which are partly linked to inflation and offer payouts to surviving spouses, is simply too high now that many retirees are surviving into their 80s.
Yet most new public-sector employees in Britain and America continue to benefit from pensions linked to their salaries. The pension costs facing the public sector are roughly the same as those facing the private sector; their employees are likely to live just as long. But because of the presumed largesse of future taxpayers, governments seem under much less pressure to reduce their pension costs. In 2005 a reform package in Britain raised the retirement age for new state employees, but still left existing employees able to retire at 60.

Private sector can’t afford public sector employees
http://www2.hernandotoday.com/content/2009/jul/04/050000/ha-private-sector-cant-afford-public-sector-employ/


64 posted on 02/03/2010 7:57:40 AM PST by WOBBLY BOB (ACORN:American Corruption for Obama Right Now)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Garvin

You wish ~ the typical COTR has to know and do his job, and also know and check on you constantly. Turn your back one second and the contractors are walking off with the office furniture and equipment.


65 posted on 02/03/2010 7:57:49 AM PST by muawiyah ("Git Out The Way")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 60 | View Replies]

To: USNBandit

“I put in $350 a month and the government puts in $650. It has copays and the catastrophic cap is $7500 a year.”

You pay $350 a month? That’s almost nothing, considering the costs...try paying insurance if you are in a small company or self employed...or better yet, try running a small business while paying north of $1200 a month for each employee and yourself....but withour mentioning how much your salary is, $350 a month means nothing. If you are earning $3,500, for instance, it is quite a deal. If it’s more than that, it’s a steal. If it’s above $6,000 it’s a GIFT. Above that is theft. I also doubt that the Gubmint only spends $1,000 on a policy...those numbers don’t foot. And sorry, but if you think that there is a $7500 cap on Federal insurance, someone is yanking BOTH of your legs. But if by some chance it is true, you can buy a catastrophic rider yourself for next to nothing.

When someone says “ooooohh I pay XXX dollars...” without saying what PERCENTAGE of their pay it is...it’s like the old George Carlin joke about the partial Yankees/Boston score...Red Sox 4....it means nothing.


66 posted on 02/03/2010 7:57:59 AM PST by jessduntno (Obama: not your typical Black Liberation Theologist/Marxist/Afro-AmeriKanner President...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

I’m not slamming you personally, but I bet the Fed and State Governments could cut their workforce by 50% and nobody would really notice.

It’s just make-work with some exceptions...The Post office is useful.

I’m not including the military in that equation.

Now if someone takes a cushy job with the government, more power to them. Get it while the gettin’ is good. I just think it’s much too bloated and needs to be cut...


67 posted on 02/03/2010 7:58:32 AM PST by kamikaze2000
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

Truth is your friend. The truth is that federal employee compensation is double the private sector when benefits are included. IOW's the benefits package of a federal worker is only 10K less than the average salary for an American in and of itself. 40K in benefit package for fed worker and 50K average salary in private sector.

You and the state workers are killing the golden goose friend. Sooner, rather than later, the goose will keel over and die.


68 posted on 02/03/2010 7:58:40 AM PST by jwalsh07
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: flowerplough

“could be die”? could die


69 posted on 02/03/2010 7:59:05 AM PST by flowerplough ( Pennsylvania today - New New Jersey meets North West Virginia.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 61 | View Replies]

To: outpostinmass2

“It is what they are working on that is not needed. “

I started to define this exception in my previous post, but then I decided that it also qualifies as “Doing Nothing”.

Your point is well taken though.

The concept that we hire MORE federal workers during an economic downturn is basic proof that there is a disconnect between the real world and club-fed.

No matter how little work they do, it’s too much. No matter how much they are paid, it’s too little.

I am amused at the gov’t types that deny this. The other forgotten scandal of a few years ago - that “diploma mills” are part of the government “more educated” fraud. Remember Laura Callahan (I think that was her name) who was CIO of DHS? She was very highly credentialed from non-existent institutions. This is widespread in government. Go figure? get a diploma by doing nothing and get a raise....PERFECT for a government employee.


70 posted on 02/03/2010 8:01:03 AM PST by RFEngineer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno

A lot of them have BS mickey mouse degrees from diploma mills. If someone is really smart - they are not going to work for the Feds. Who would want to be in a stifling environment - people who want security and want to goof off.


71 posted on 02/03/2010 8:01:11 AM PST by Frantzie (TV - sending Americans towards Islamic serfdom - Cancel TV service NOW)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: achilles2000

I would also point out that graduate degrees in areas such as “education” and anything with a “studies” in the name have a negative value and are warning signs of credulous minds stuffed with things that aren’t true.


Repeat LOUD and OFTEN............


72 posted on 02/03/2010 8:01:24 AM PST by PeterPrinciple ( Seeking the truth here folks.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: Presbyterian Reporter; Poundstone
Assuming the above numbers are true, the fact that in 1988 there was one FED per 110 residents (notice they did not use the word citizens) and today there is one FED employee per 155 residents, the comparison ignores the tremendous strides made in computers during the past 20 years.

You also have to take into account the fact that a thousands and thousands of Civil Servants have been replaced by contractors in the past 20 years. Fedzilla still pays for them with our tax dollars ... they're just not federal employees any more.

In 2006 there were 10.5 million people on federal contracts or working with federal grant money - and it's gone up since then. The ratio of people funded by Fedzilla per citizen hasn't gone down, it's gone up.

73 posted on 02/03/2010 8:01:44 AM PST by tx_eggman (Obama has "Czars" because men with more integrity than he has still use the titles "Don" and "Capo")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone
Twenty percent of federal workers have a master’s, professional or doctorate degree, compared with 13 percent in the private sector. Fifty-one percent of federal employees have a college degree of some sort, but only 35 percent do in the private sector.
A degree in what? I bet that the guy in the private sector with a PhD in Physics or Electrical Engineering is compared here with a public sector paper pusher with a degree in Marxist Sociology or Advanced Queer Studies.
In fact, government figures indicate that federal employees are underpaid by 26 percent compared with their counterparts in similar position in the business world.
The devil is in the details here, again. How exactly do they determine who “their counterparts” are? Some paper pusher who is leading a department of 20 other paper pushers in the Department of Education is in their estimation probably equivalent to a manager in the private sector running a department of 20 people generating hundreds of millions of revenue for their company every year (all of whom would be fired once they stop bringing in any more profit). But we know better, don’t we?
74 posted on 02/03/2010 8:01:56 AM PST by cartan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Rodamala

So you never go to a doctor?


75 posted on 02/03/2010 8:02:45 AM PST by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Sursam Abordine

Agree. I am retired Army, now a federal employee. I came to my fed job with 22 years of experience in a very high tech field. How much would private industry pay for that kind of experience?
Also, forget about the “90%” retire pay. Since 1985 the fed retirement system, FERS, is similar to a 401k, you get out what you put in. Still, there are a very few (old) folks still covered by the old CSRS system which is indeed an unblieveably generous retirement plan. Also, I make a monthly payment for health/dental/life insurance just like most folks.
Although not a union member, I do have pretty good job security. Bottom line: I try to earn my pay every day just like anyone else. After spending a career in the uniformed Army I am very happy to be working for the Department of the Army as a civilian.


76 posted on 02/03/2010 8:03:15 AM PST by pappyone (New to Freep, still working a tag line.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno
Is this factoring in their cadillac insurance plans, insane retirement benefit packages and job counseling, “golden parachutes” when they get bumped for political reasons and virtually fire-proof employment contracts? No, huh?

Go do some research about the difference between SES (Special Executive Service) and GS/WG (General Service and Wage Grade) employees, then post. With all due respect, you don't seem to have a clue what you're talking about.

77 posted on 02/03/2010 8:03:54 AM PST by Terabitten (Vets wrote a blank check, payable to the Constitution, for an amount up to and including their life.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: achilles2000
All government is overhead.

The only value a government employee has, in terms of productivity, is the degree to which he protects, enhances or otherwise enables a private sector worker to produce.

78 posted on 02/03/2010 8:04:45 AM PST by TChris ("Hello", the politician lied.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: Errant
FACT: With few exceptions, they're working for the government because they can't make it in the private sector.

If that's a fact, then you should easily be able to back it up with a source, or multiple sources.

If it's an opinion, well....

79 posted on 02/03/2010 8:05:24 AM PST by Terabitten (Vets wrote a blank check, payable to the Constitution, for an amount up to and including their life.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

If the people in the Federal government are so smart and talented, why do we need so many of them?

Really - there should be a limit on how many people the Federal government can hire. Something like, oh, I don’t know, half of what it is now. I believe there are over 2,000,000 Federal government employees (excluding the Post Office). So that is about 0.67% of the population. That should be cut in half over the next 10 years and we will see how things go. Probably would not notice a bit of difference. In fact, things would probably improve.

http://pushbackuntil.com


80 posted on 02/03/2010 8:07:31 AM PST by DennisR (Look around - God gives countless, indisputable clues that He does, indeed, exist.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
There's always someone around who imagines that federal employees do nothing all day and still get paid.

Not quite right. We imagine federal employees do nothing that anyone would pay them for in the private sector (ie nothing of value) and still get paid.

81 posted on 02/03/2010 8:07:34 AM PST by from occupied ga (Your most dangerous enemy is your own government,)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno
Is this factoring in their cadillac insurance plans, insane retirement benefit packages

The insane retirement plans ended around 1985, at least for the Postal Service. Anyone employed after that falls under FERS, not Civil Service - and gets a modest retirement package.

The "cadillac" insurance plans aren't even offered by the Postal Service OR the Union. I don't even take their insurance. My wife has a better (and yes, cadillac) plan from her work.

All is not as it seems, and as rumor would have it.

82 posted on 02/03/2010 8:07:48 AM PST by TnGOP (Petey the dog is my foriegn policy advisor. He's really quite good!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

This article is inside the Beltway BS.


83 posted on 02/03/2010 8:08:08 AM PST by KC_Conspirator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cletus.D.Yokel
..... that are immigrants or first-generation of immigrants. (AKA “affirmative action hires”)

You're an idiot, Cletus, regardless of where your grandfather was born.


Immigrant


Immigrant


"first-generation of immigrants"


"first-generation of immigrants"

84 posted on 02/03/2010 8:08:22 AM PST by Polybius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Terabitten

“Go do some research about the difference between SES (Special Executive Service) and GS/WG (General Service and Wage Grade) employees, then post. With all due respect, you don’t seem to have a clue what you’re talking about.”

Really? What was the post about? Just one of these groups, or was it about workers in aggregate? With all due respect, I know PLENTY about this subject...which do you want to get specific about, because this original response was specific to neither. Enlighten me.


85 posted on 02/03/2010 8:08:41 AM PST by jessduntno (Obama: not your typical Black Liberation Theologist/Marxist/Afro-AmeriKanner President...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 77 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

The article misstates the criticism.

Federal civilian workers earn more than non-government employees doing the same work.

The article then argues bovine excrement regarding the relative education. After all, I’m quite certain that Bristol-Myers Squibb doesn’t hire high school dropouts to research cancer cures. But the article appears to assert this as “fact” in its defense of the bloated payscales.


86 posted on 02/03/2010 8:08:43 AM PST by MortMan (Stubbing one's toes is a valid (if painful) way of locating furniture in the dark.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone
'...federal employees are underpaid by 26 percent compared with their counterparts in similar position in the business world."
Too funny! So THAT explains why all those "highly educated" and motivated gov't workers are clamoring for private sector jobs!

87 posted on 02/03/2010 8:08:57 AM PST by astyanax (Liberalism: Logic's retarded cousin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: getitright
Oh yes. You are so right. I renewed my driver’s license last week and there were dozens of rocket surgeons behind the counter. Their politeness and efficiency made them worth every bit of their $100k/yr salary.

You do realize, of course, that the article was about Federal workers, but your li'l rant here is about state workers? They're NOT the same.

88 posted on 02/03/2010 8:11:01 AM PST by Terabitten (Vets wrote a blank check, payable to the Constitution, for an amount up to and including their life.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Errant
FACT: With few exceptions, they're working for the government because they can't make it in the private sector. FACT: They're better paid because of unions, control of funding and cronyism.

FACT: Most are working there because they had an opportunity for a good paying job - took it, and held on to it.

FACT: OK, you got me on this one. Spot on! We hate the Union!

89 posted on 02/03/2010 8:11:23 AM PST by TnGOP (Petey the dog is my foriegn policy advisor. He's really quite good!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Sursam Abordine

Any argument that talks about all “Federal Workers” explicitly includes the slackers and the productive.

Much the same as any article that discusses any large company’s workforce covers the mail room to the executive washroom.


90 posted on 02/03/2010 8:12:13 AM PST by MortMan (Stubbing one's toes is a valid (if painful) way of locating furniture in the dark.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: TnGOP

“The insane retirement plans ended around 1985, at least for the Postal Service. “

Gee, I didn’t realize this was about the postal service...I thought it was addressing the broad spectrum...

And by the way, if it is true that it is so dismal, why is there so much more competition and nepotism for many of the the jobs, instead of the great ones available in the private sector?


91 posted on 02/03/2010 8:13:08 AM PST by jessduntno (Obama: not your typical Black Liberation Theologist/Marxist/Afro-AmeriKanner President...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 82 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno; refermech; Cletus.D.Yokel; skeeter; George from New England; Errant; ...

PING


92 posted on 02/03/2010 8:14:11 AM PST by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno; refermech; Cletus.D.Yokel; skeeter; George from New England; Errant; ...

PINGYears of institutionalization don’t equal “education”, nor do degrees - nor are all degrees equal within the same specialty or across specialties.

Nobody in his right mind would think, for example, that the average VA doctor is as competent as the average private practice doctor (unless you have never dealt with the VA).

I would also point out that graduate degrees in areas such as “education” and anything with a “studies” in the name have a negative value and are warning signs of credulous minds stuffed with things that aren’t true. Government abounds with these people who produce negative value added. A high school student with good CAD skills or a Microsoft certification is more “educated” that any of these people, if we are looking at education as meaning the ability to add value.

Moreover, the value of someone’s effort depends on how it is used. Even a great legal mind drafting regulations to implement Barney Frank’s plans for “affordable” housing is producing negative value.

The article is just propaganda to justify high salaries and benefits for government drone work.


93 posted on 02/03/2010 8:14:36 AM PST by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: Presbyterian Reporter
The chapter also counters those who might see a growing federal workforce as an indication that government is getting too big. In 1988, when Ronald Reagan, that champion of small government, was president, there was one federal employee for every 110 residents. Twenty years later, the ratio was one to 155.

Actually there is a very simple reason for this and either the author is being disingenuous or ignorant. The size of the military has gone down considerably between Reagan and Obama. They are federal employees too.

The problem with the Feds is the number of people employed. There are so many layabouts in each office that would be fired in the private sector but whose poor performance gets covered up and the slack taken up by employees that actually care to see the job get done.

94 posted on 02/03/2010 8:14:46 AM PST by VeniVidiVici (Marsha Coakley's been teabagged. Populists Hugo Chavez and Hussein Obama are next.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone; muawiyah
For the sake of argument, let's accept the premise that Federal employees work as hard or harder than private sector workers, are more educated on average than private sector workers, and are underpaid as compared to private sector workers. With those points in mind, I have two simple questions:

1. What percentage of current Federal workers are necessary for the smooth, safe, and prosperous functioning of our nation?

2. Should the Federal workforce increase, so should some Federal workers be let go?

95 posted on 02/03/2010 8:15:24 AM PST by SoCal Pubbie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: from occupied ga

Where else can you go with your Liberal Arts degree? McDonalds?


96 posted on 02/03/2010 8:15:51 AM PST by vwbug
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: pappyone
Well, seeing as this article is from the Washington Post, whose readers are...ahem....federal workers, whaddya' expect?

It's the 80-20 principle, if you ask me. Twenty-percent of the people doing 80% of the work. There are some constitutional functions of government which I am glad to pay taxes for. The other, what, 95% of entitlement expenditures, ACORN payments, and such, needs to be taken to the dumpster.

Anyone who lives "Inside the Beltway" knows about the shenanigans inside fed gov't employment: minorities suing minorities for discrimination, people who climb the GS ladder just by breathing, PhD's getting in at GS-9, and a whole bunch of inexperienced people who think they should be in charge and promoted.

OTOH, there are hard workers out there - hat's off to both of them (just kidding; I think there are more than 2).

97 posted on 02/03/2010 8:16:18 AM PST by elk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 76 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

I’ve worked with and right next to Federal employees they really are NOT any different than everyone else. Except AFTER they have worked for the FedGov for some years. Then, yes, many of them — MOST of them are lazy indulgent goldbrickers who think of themselves as entitled and underpaid, even when it is obvious to outsiders like me that most would make less in private business, and — once they are there in FedGov and have become inured in the culture — they think they have so much greater ability than the lowly private sectors scrappers and drecks.

This is an article from the VOICE OF FEDGOV — the WASHINGTON POST! It’s sick. It’s a massive public self mastrubation-fest of an article.


98 posted on 02/03/2010 8:16:20 AM PST by bvw
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

The country would be better off if they did nothing all day. The problem is that they actually do some work, work that slowly destroys the country.


99 posted on 02/03/2010 8:17:15 AM PST by Republic of Texas (Socialism Always Fails)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Poundstone

Just keeping it real.


100 posted on 02/03/2010 8:18:25 AM PST by jwalsh07
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-200 ... 251-270 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson