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To: SwedishConservative; beejaa

Let me tell you both a story:

In the early twentieth century a young graduate student at Princeton believed it was physically impossible for a particular essential part of radios to be made smaller. That was to be the subject of his doctorate thesis. It was never written due to events recounted in the following paragraph. (The fact I can’t remember this guy’s name speaks for itself concerning his achievements.)

In another part of the country was an engineer who knew he could make a great deal of money making that same particular part for radios much smaller, and then patenting it. You see, he didn’t know it was impossible according to folks in universities. Bill Lear just went ahead, designed it, patented it, and made a hell of a lot of money. That’s how he (yeah - the Bill Lear of Lear Jets fame) made his first fortune.

I’ve just riddled all your damn arguments with bullet holes. Think about the above story, about how having a patent system engenders creativity and a free market system produces wealth.

Our main problem is the so-called Progressives (Socialists) infiltrated the education system and the government, killed independent thought and stifled innovation. They are also trying to smear the concept of earning money as evil.

I am not naive. Neither do I think the Chinese lacking in creativity or genius. Quite the contrary. One thing I do know to be universally true: people work more enthusiastically when they are free and it benefits themselves monetarily rather than when they are forced to do so by government edict backed up by threats or the barrel of a gun.


22 posted on 02/04/2010 8:42:04 PM PST by SatinDoll (NO Foreign Nationals as our President!!)
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To: SatinDoll
In another part of the country was an engineer who knew he could make a great deal of money making that same particular part for radios much smaller, and then patenting it. You see, he didn’t know it was impossible according to folks in universities. Bill Lear just went ahead, designed it, patented it, and made a hell of a lot of money. That’s how he (yeah - the Bill Lear of Lear Jets fame) made his first fortune.

That right there in bold is the key. If this had been today, some guy who thought that "maybe we can make radio's smaller" could have patented that idea right off the bat, calling it "coneptual idea for compact radio transmitter" or whatever. Mr Lear, hapilly tinkering along in his lab, would have spent endless hours actually BUILDING a smaller radio just to be stripped of the results because some other schmuck already patented the "idea" before him. Today, you can patent something without having a clue as to how to acutally build it. THAT is what is stifling innovation today and THAT was the point I was trying to make. Mr Lear wouldn't have been building any jets, he would have been busy in courts for the rest of his life.

I can give you concrete example. About a year ago (some of you might remember), Blackberry got involved in a patent infringment lawsuit where another company held a patent for "transmission of electronic messages with a wireless device". That was it - no implementation, no feasible product description, nothing. Just a "I thought of this really nifty idea" bullshit conceptual patent. Blackberry ended up having to pay over a hundred million dollars in license-fees.

I'm not some hippie who thinks patents and copyrights are wrong, bad we're in serious need of reform in our current legislation. And if you don't think we do, try to think of one, serious independant innovation in the last 15 years. Try to name one entreprenur who's made it big like Mr Lear from an original innovation in the last 15 years.

26 posted on 02/05/2010 4:46:48 PM PST by SwedishConservative
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