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Loss of Language, Loss of Thought (the dumbing down of America)
IC ^ | Wolfgang Grassl

Posted on 07/02/2010 11:48:13 AM PDT by NYer


Loss of language among the younger population --
that is to say, the ability to formulate and enunciate properly constructed sentences that reflect clear thought -- is growing at a staggering rate in the United States. Even among students whose academic aptitude is well above the national average, my years as an undergraduate business professor show that four out of five will make grave spelling errors in written assignments or exams, and about half that regularly commit grammatical blunders. The ubiquitous confusion between "there" and "their" may still be considered a quaint and negligible fluke that nearly creates a new orthographic norm; the inability to express lucid arguments must not.
 
What is being lost is the capacity to think in terms of cause and effect, of distinguishing between differing levels of argument, and particularly any appreciation for abstraction. Increasingly, students expect to be spoon-fed with concrete examples, operational instructions, mechanical repetitions, and pictorial representation. The loss of language is but a symptom of the loss of thought -- and losing thought means losing much more.
 
Assume a typical question in an introductory class on marketing: "Why do we segment markets?" A typical student response is: "What do you mean?" Even the most experienced professor can only paraphrase the question: "Why do we, in nearly all product markets, break down total customer demand into smaller groups?" A response will then frequently start with, "It's like . . ." The question requires students to provide an explanation and not a definition -- to recognize that the question concerns reasons and not causes, and that these reasons must be of a more general nature than any particular example of segmented markets. Inability to answer the question reveals not a lack of factual knowledge -- every student can understand the variability in consumers' desire for and benefits from various products. It rather shows deficiency in grasping the nature of "why" questions, which require moving beyond concrete examples.
 
Let us, in Wittgenstein's fashion, look at the grammar of "it's like," for it reveals the nature of the problem. The phrase seeks to define something by exemplification. As an answer to the question, "What is a ball?" the "it" in "it's like" does not refer to the definiendum, but to the request for a definition. The traditional way of defining something, according to Aristotle and the scholastic logicians, was per genus proximum et differentiam specificam: We need to name the higher category to which a term belongs, then specify some characteristic that sets it apart from other things within this category.
 
However, "like" does not seek to place a ball into the next higher category of spheres or objects, nor does it offer a synonym. It gives an instance of balls, or of the usage of balls. Providing merely an aspect of what is to be explained is not only reductionist (by substituting a part for the whole); it is also a subjectivist move that avoids describing and thus reflecting on the essence of what is to be explained. It is indicative of our age of increasing relativism under the guise of "pluralism" and "tolerance" -- your feeling about the nature of something is just as good as my feeling, because there really isn't any "is"; there may not even be an "a." Then a ball might as well have edges, for who can tell me that I can only call something a ball if it is round?
 
 
The problem ultimately lies in a misconstrued metaphysics, or rather in the absence of any notion of ontology at all. When Bill Clinton was asked whether he had sexual relations with a White House intern and famously replied that this depended on the meaning of "is," his statement was of course evasive and facetious. But it was also intelligent: For apart from the time-indexed meaning of the copula in the present tense, the "is" in "This is a ball" is different from that in "A ball is a spherical object." The first sentence identifies a particular (or token) as a member of a class (or type), whereas the second offers a definition through the synonymy of types. The "is" in "it's like" is neither of these, for it seeks to define a type -- for example, "a ball" or "market segmentation" -- by reference to a token. It does not even modify the definiendum directly.
 
There is a curious reluctance to think about the nature of things, maybe as a result of decades of teaching that there is no such nature apart from what one wants them to be. Rather, students increasingly see the world phenomenologically -- as a haphazard arrangement of "stuff" and of events informed by the sensory impressions of their own experience but devoid of any structure.
 
Surveys show that the average American receives some 5,000 external stimuli per day and spends more than eight hours a day in front of screens -- television, computer monitors, cellphones, gaming consoles, and so on. Where in earlier ages people worked in their gardens, played an instrument, went fishing, read books, entertained guests, or engaged in conversation with family or friends, they have become passive and speechless consumers of canned content. These screens help produce a people that is losing its language. But more importantly, these people no longer see structures in their world but rather a bewildering juxtaposition of seemingly unrelated events. Vicarious living and proxy experiences are the deeper problem with our students' loss of language.
 
Of course, not all students are alike: Many do excel and emerge as active thinkers and thoughtful speakers. But as a society, we are a far cry from seeing the critical thinking that progressive educators want to convey. In order to think critically, one must be able to keep causes apart from effects, fact from interpretation, belief from knowledge, definitions from explanations, and much more. Critical thought requires determining the range of alternatives and applying to them a clear and consistent standard of evaluation.
 
But not only is such standard often amiss after years of indoctrination in relativism, even the range of alternatives is not clear. Understanding what scholastic philosophers have called the status quaestionis has become a challenge. Students often simply do not understand the nature (and grammar) of the question and match it with a fitting answer format. It is a problem of losing language and the ability to work with it logically, creatively, and yes, critically.
 
 
The problem with the loss of language must be identified at a profounder level yet. In our society, words have long lost their meaning and have become arbitrary sounds or icons. Sometimes the American penchant for pragmatism goes to absurd extremes -- as when "entrée" is used not for a first course (or "entry" dish), as in the rest of the world, but for a main course; or when the political term "liberal" has come to be used in the opposite sense of its historical and proper meaning. Yet the vast majority of speakers -- and even our intellectuals -- will see nothing wrong with this, for they honestly believe that words only mean what we want them to mean.
 
The question of the natural or conventional nature of language is one of the oldest in philosophy, of course, and arguments on both sides have been bantered about since Plato. But has any society been so given to arbitrariness and to a redefinition of meaning at will as ours? From there, it is only a short way to redefining the meaning of marriage, family, torture, or the priesthood. Is this an instance of that "dictatorship of relativism" by which Pope Benedict XVI has characterized present-day Western culture?
 
In our society, the power of language has declined. How are students to understand the world of the Bible if curses, blessings, or vows are no longer understood as performative speech acts that have (often immediate) efficacy? How are they to deal with the Catholic view of sacraments, according to which the saying is a doing and brings about an ontological change in the world? How can they relate to the Word (Logos) not referring to or being a name for Christ but being God (Jn 1:1)? How can the greeting, "Peace to this house!" be such a "big deal" that it actually brings about peace (Lk 10:5-6)? How can students still appreciate classical pieces of literature that have protagonists who offer their lives for a promise made?
 
In most cases, what we say no longer matters much, for words have become cheapened. Qui perd sa langue, perd son âme aussi -- "who loses one's language also loses one's soul," the French say. And the Québecois have added: Qui perd sa langue, perd sa foi -- "who loses one's language also loses one's faith."
 
 
Why has American society suffered this degradation? There are, of course, several reasons. For one, pragmatism has become the common national religion. Students have constantly been told that there is no essence and meaning to things, and that they are only what they want themselves to be. They have been fed a heavy diet of relativism and indoctrination in one of the changing variants of collectivism -- feminism, socialism, and nationalism being only the most prominent among them. They are taught what to "make" of themselves, how to "construct" an identity in a category that is politically desirable, but not to discover what -- or rather who -- they are and for which purpose they are in the world.
 
Who still takes the Gospel seriously: "But I tell you that men will have to give account on the day of judgment for every careless word they have spoken. For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned" (Mt 12:36-37). Our university scholars will interpret such passages away according to "critical hermeneutics." But our students are left speechless if they come across them at all.
 
The blame does not lie with students (although a bit of personal effort might surely be expected). It lies largely with two or more generations of indulgent and misguided educators and with the political guardians of education. Too often the "it's like" phenomenon has been shrugged off. If educators, who are meant to carry the torch of literacy and learning, do not regard these developments as calls to action but dismiss them as a necessary by-product of benign cultural change -- "You know, I'm not sure I could do it myself" -- we suffer from a major dislocation. Our education then no longer has standards to which we educate, or if it does, they are not about outcomes measured in knowledge or skills. And it reveals rhetoric about "liberal education" as nothing but hot air.
 
Remember that, between the Greeks and the Renaissance, the purpose of the artes liberales was defined, the list of subjects was closed, and the books to be read changed little. Of course, at the tertiary level of education, it may be too late to find remedies for the loss of language, unless universities want to be transformed into high schools. The work has to be done in the formative years of students -- in their earlier teens. Forget the renaming of secondary-school "English" into "Language Arts." We need exercises in spelling, grammar, style, speech, rhetoric, and the classics.
 
The phrase "it's like" itself seems, well, like a trifle. But it is a symptom of an underlying and more serious malaise: The loss of an ability to think clearly and express these thoughts perceptibly is no trifling matter. It makes our younger generation, and possibly those generations that succeed them, susceptible to boilerplate thinking and ultimately manipulation by others. A speechless society, or one that can no longer enunciate its will clearly and with a large register of distinctions, is reduced to an ant heap.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government
KEYWORDS: america; language; learning; teaching
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Wolfgang Grassl is associate professor of Business Administration at St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisconsin, and does his research on branding, marketing strategy, the ontology of business, and the Catholic intellectual tradition.

1 posted on 07/02/2010 11:48:21 AM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; markomalley; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; ...
Catholic Ping
Please freepmail me if you want on/off this list


2 posted on 07/02/2010 11:49:08 AM PDT by NYer ("God dwells in our midst, in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar." St. Maximilian Kolbe)
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To: NYer

I would comment on this, but it’s like this, the dude just used way to many words in his article. Couldn’t he just like, you know, draw us a picture or something.


3 posted on 07/02/2010 11:53:14 AM PDT by commish (Freedom tastes sweetest to those who have fought to preserve it.)
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To: NYer

Literacy may no longer necessary for most employers and workers. Punching a little picture of a hamburger on a computer screen renders verbal skills unnecessary. In addition, they can vote by pushing little pictures of “The Divine One” holding his arms out wide in forgiveness.


4 posted on 07/02/2010 11:54:34 AM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: NYer
Excellent article.

I think the damage was done on purpose. You cannot rule a nation of smart, articulate, self-reliant people. And since some people dearly want to rule over others, the decision mas made to destroy our ability to resist manipulation.

5 posted on 07/02/2010 11:55:40 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: NYer
Highly recommend:

Its hilarious.

6 posted on 07/02/2010 11:56:22 AM PDT by Spirochete (Just say NO to RINOs)
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To: ClearCase_guy

Similar damage done in all math areas with the “learning by the calculator” method.


7 posted on 07/02/2010 11:59:50 AM PDT by ScoopAmma (We are led by the Resident -in Chief; aka part-time member of Webelo Troop 44)
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To: NYer

“We need exercises in spelling, grammar, style, ...”

My pet peeve: Typed communication without any capitalization. Amazingly lazy, and rude to the recipient. I have a cousin, and also a friend, who sent emails that way and I quit responding — mainly because I refused to muddle through the lower-case mess and even read the messages. Finally, when they asked why I never replied, I told them. They’ve re-discovered the “shift” key.


8 posted on 07/02/2010 12:00:03 PM PDT by MayflowerMadam (Every time a liberal whines, an angel gets his wings.)
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To: NYer

Prof. Grassl has written truly and with great insight to the ultimate result of “whatever” and “you know what I meant even if I didn’t spell it correctly” that comes from texting speak or other such language laziness. Yet the masses, even on FR, wail and gnash their keyboards at “spelling/grammar Nazis” who try to show how error in correctly expressing oneself can create an impression of poor thinking skills.


9 posted on 07/02/2010 12:01:26 PM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: NYer
FTA: It lies largely with two or more generations of indulgent and misguided educators and with the political guardians of education.

I might add, **and with parents and other adults who accept slovenly language (and use it themselves).**

The there and their errors I'll lay/lie at the feet of Mr. Bill Gates and his spell check machine.

10 posted on 07/02/2010 12:02:02 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic (Southeast Wisconsin)
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To: ScoopAmma
People who cannot balance their own checkbook have no understanding -- no fear -- of a $1.6T deficit.

And some folks like it that way.

11 posted on 07/02/2010 12:02:14 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: MayflowerMadam

My daughters were shocked when I blocked their phones’ text messaging function. I had repeatedly asked that they communicate with me by using complete sentences and correct spelling. They soon realized I was serious.


12 posted on 07/02/2010 12:04:30 PM PDT by ScoopAmma (We are led by the Resident -in Chief; aka part-time member of Webelo Troop 44)
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To: NYer
...the renaming of secondary-school "English" into "Language Arts."

And the renaming of history, geography, economics, and civics into "Social Studies."

13 posted on 07/02/2010 12:04:39 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: commish
It's like a total bummer that the nextgen has no wordage skills at all man....
All kidding aside my daughter reads alot and has an extensive vocab for a 13 yr old and has told me on more than one occasion that she has had to explain the meanings of the words she using to her friends(public school victims)

she thinks its funny - I think it's sad!

14 posted on 07/02/2010 12:04:56 PM PDT by groovychick (I have nothing to say for myself)
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To: NYer

To me it’s simple. People have different priorities nowadays.

People used to think it important to be logical, intelligent, to show one’s culture. To self-examine by means of good literature and philosophy, including religion. It takes time to learn to speak well, write well, improve one’s mind.

But nowadays it’s important to have a good time. Things simply aren’t sought after if they don’t give us something we want. Everything in our culture tells us that.


15 posted on 07/02/2010 12:11:36 PM PDT by I still care (I believe in the universality of freedom -George Bush, asked if he regrets going to war.)
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To: NYer

Double-plus ungood Newspeak!


16 posted on 07/02/2010 12:12:40 PM PDT by seowulf ("If you write a whole line of zeroes, it's still---nothing"...Kira Alexandrovna Argounova)
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To: NYer

Ping for later


17 posted on 07/02/2010 12:13:15 PM PDT by FreedomNotSafety
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To: NYer
They act as if “like” is a recent phenomenon. This word has been used in slang since at least the 80’s. We are getting to a place not only in the USA but the World where short bullets will be used to discuss matters and not long dissertations. Most likely the only time you will use true English is for your dissertation in college.
18 posted on 07/02/2010 12:13:20 PM PDT by napscoordinator
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To: ClearCase_guy

I’m beginning to think this is by design as well. I’m well into middle age and returned to school a few years back in an education program. I find it astonishing what is advocated in the classroom. Some new methods are very good; others are not. And yes, I really do think that it’s probably by design. If we’re right, then it’s chilling.


19 posted on 07/02/2010 12:13:34 PM PDT by twigs
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To: NYer

“Loss of language among the younger population — that is to say, the ability to formulate and enunciate properly constructed sentences that reflect clear thought — is growing at a staggering rate in the United States.”

Understatement! (Along with the loss of accurate history from a cause and effect standpoint, loss of the will to advance in science and math, LOSS of an appreciation for responsibility and self-discipline...ad nauseum.)


20 posted on 07/02/2010 12:15:33 PM PDT by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified Decartes))
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To: NYer

This is because all the teachers are female, and they are all looking to put a 14 year old nothch in thier belt.

Overblown observation, but between Unionisation and the sexin school its no wonder we are in such bad shape.


21 posted on 07/02/2010 12:16:16 PM PDT by Colvin (Proud Owner '66 Binder PU, '66 Binder Travelall,)
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To: ScoopAmma

LOL. Good for you. I do like texting, but I LOVE the fact that you are insistent about the WAY you and your daughters communicate. Wonder what tortures they’ll inflict on their daughters some day thanks to the way they were raised!


22 posted on 07/02/2010 12:16:38 PM PDT by twigs
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To: NYer

Although I don’t subscribe to all of linguistic philosophy, there is definately something to what the professor says. I’ve noticed that most of the classic works, especially those translated from Latin, displaly a use of language, writing and argument, far superior to that of today.


23 posted on 07/02/2010 12:16:45 PM PDT by circlecity
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To: T-Bird45

The ultimate admission of Grassl’s contention that the ability to think has been lost is the ubiquitous use of “ya know”. It is a placeholder in conversational flow which serves as a stand-in for “I’m not able to form a coherent thought at this point so please just empathize with my riff.”


24 posted on 07/02/2010 12:17:43 PM PDT by Paine in the Neck (Napolean fries the idea powder.)
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To: ScoopAmma
Really? On the cell phone? I could see enforcing that with e-mail, but phone texting? That is extremely harsh and quite frankly expensive. Oh well I guess you have your reasons. I want my children to write correctly but appropriately and realistically as well. BTW, I can diagram a sentence in a New York Minute.
25 posted on 07/02/2010 12:17:51 PM PDT by napscoordinator
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To: NYer

If you can stand the cursing, watch “Idiocracy”.


26 posted on 07/02/2010 12:20:19 PM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
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To: circlecity

“I’ve noticed that most of the classic works, especially those translated from Latin, display a use of language, writing and argument, far superior to that of today.”

####

You don’t even have to go back that far.

Much more recent examples of richness in expression and a thorough development of ideas, off the top of my head, would be Dickens’ magnificent David Copperfield-written as a mere popular novel for a very general audience, and the simple exchange of letters betwen John and Abigail Addams.


27 posted on 07/02/2010 12:21:38 PM PDT by EyeGuy
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To: Fiji Hill
And the renaming of history, geography, economics, and civics into "Social Studies."

We had "social studies" in my high school, that was in southern Missouri, at the time a very conservative area, 1959-1963. We also had the other subjects that you named.

28 posted on 07/02/2010 12:25:07 PM PDT by Graybeard58 (We couldn't keep the commandments when there was only ONE!)
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To: NYer
Really great essay - thanks for posting it.

"Like" was chosen long ago as the spear-tip of the eduactional death stroke against American students. It's been a zipper handle that has been used to progressively undo rational thought itself.

The author ends by comparing the results to an ant hill - which makes me reflect that ant hills are blind totalitarian organizations, with working eunuchs, run by a queen.


29 posted on 07/02/2010 12:25:12 PM PDT by Talisker (When you find a turtle on top of a fence post, you can be damn sure it didn't get there on it's own.)
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To: EyeGuy

No, you don’t have to go back that far but it’s interesting that all you mention would have been well schooled in the classics and in Latin. We gave up an important linguistic and intellectual asset when we abandoned the classics.


30 posted on 07/02/2010 12:27:01 PM PDT by circlecity
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To: NYer

Use this as a PS to my post #20:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaqaImebd1M&feature=player_embedded#!


31 posted on 07/02/2010 12:28:45 PM PDT by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified Decartes))
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To: napscoordinator

No additional expense incurred just because of the length of the text. Unlimited Verizon family plan charge is the same each and every month regardless of the length or number of texts. Being realistic is spelling the word “you” as “you”; not “u”.


32 posted on 07/02/2010 12:35:19 PM PDT by ScoopAmma (We are led by the Resident -in Chief; aka part-time member of Webelo Troop 44)
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To: NYer

It is because young people no longer read. They don’t see their parents read. I suggest books for my children and discuss the books with them. Those I haven’t read, I ask them questions about (bad grammar, ending a sentence with a preposition - grin). We talk about favorite parts and lessons learned. Parents need to show their children the importance and enjoyment of reading by doing it in front of them . By reading good books, children get an innate sense of grammar, which helps as they formally learn it.


33 posted on 07/02/2010 12:37:07 PM PDT by keepitreal ( Don't tread on me.)
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To: MayflowerMadam

Bravo


34 posted on 07/02/2010 12:42:03 PM PDT by School of Rational Thought (Need work. MBA, CPA, Black Belt. Diverse industry and cross border experience.)
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To: groovychick
It's like a total bummer that the nextgen has no wordage skills at all man.... All kidding aside my daughter reads alot and has an extensive vocab for a 13 yr old and has told me on more than one occasion that she has had to explain the meanings of the words she using to her friends(public school victims) she thinks its funny - I think it's sad!
35 posted on 07/02/2010 12:45:40 PM PDT by School of Rational Thought (Need work. MBA, CPA, Black Belt. Diverse industry and cross border experience.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic
The there and their errors I'll lay/lie at the feet of Mr. Bill Gates and his spell check machine.

Don't forget .. they're.

36 posted on 07/02/2010 12:46:05 PM PDT by NYer ("God dwells in our midst, in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar." St. Maximilian Kolbe)
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To: NYer

Can’t we do anything right anymore!!!???


37 posted on 07/02/2010 12:50:12 PM PDT by erod
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To: groovychick
It's like a total bummer that the nextgen has no wordage skills at all man....

That would be "skillz."

38 posted on 07/02/2010 12:50:20 PM PDT by HIDEK6
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To: napscoordinator
This word has been used in slang since at least the 80’s.

I first became aware of this usage in the 1950s. And I suspect it was not new even then.

39 posted on 07/02/2010 12:52:18 PM PDT by HIDEK6
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To: NYer

“speechless consumers of canned content”..

Precisely the cause. Thanks for posting this brilliant article.


40 posted on 07/02/2010 12:54:04 PM PDT by Chuzzlewit
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To: napscoordinator

“This word has been used in slang since at least the 80’s.”

How old are you?

That has been around since at least the 50s, as in “like Wow, Daddio...” (Maynard G. Krebs)


41 posted on 07/02/2010 12:58:16 PM PDT by Nabber
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To: reaganaut; greyfoxx39
From there, it is only a short way to redefining the meaning of marriage, family, torture, or the priesthood. Is this an instance of that "dictatorship of relativism" by which Pope Benedict XVI has characterized present-day Western culture?

An excellent, excellent article.

42 posted on 07/02/2010 12:59:53 PM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife (Utopia is being foisted on Americans for their own good.-- J. Robert Smith)
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To: HIDEK6
They act as if “like” is a recent phenomenon.

I recall an issue of MAD Magazine from 1960 that made fun of this expression. If I remember correctly, a sign in a library cautioning patrons to keep their voices down read: "Like, Quiet!"

43 posted on 07/02/2010 1:06:06 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: commish

Hahah!


44 posted on 07/02/2010 1:10:12 PM PDT by Peanut Gallery (The essence of freedom is the proper limitation of government.)
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To: NYer

“Life is, like, an analogy.”


45 posted on 07/02/2010 1:17:19 PM PDT by Erasmus (Looks like we're between a lithic outcropping and a region of low compressibility.)
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To: ScoopAmma

Good for you. I figure the next generation will have no clue when it comes to spelling.


46 posted on 07/02/2010 1:18:56 PM PDT by MayflowerMadam (Every time a liberal whines, an angel gets his wings.)
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To: NYer

Years ago, people took pride in speaking correctly and speaking well. Today, many youth take pride in speaking street slang like a common thug.


47 posted on 07/02/2010 1:25:44 PM PDT by matt1234 (The only crisis 0bama can manage is one he intentionally created.)
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To: napscoordinator

I remember it starting with the “Valley Girl” speak that all the kids thought was so cool. Unfortunately it caught on in a big way and it just gets worse. Fingernails on a blackboard aren’t as bad as somebody who says “like” six times in a ten word sentence.


48 posted on 07/02/2010 1:29:14 PM PDT by abigailsmybaby ( I'm not going to buy my kids an encyclopedia. Let them walk to school like I did. Yogi Berra)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

You will lay the errors upon Mr. Gates’s feet. Lay: to put or place. Lie: to rest or recline; deliberately to speak falsely.


49 posted on 07/02/2010 1:45:12 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Imperialism requires a certain dotty elan." ~Mark Steyn)
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To: Tax-chick

Oh, I know the difference, but many of today’s college kids don’t. When corrected, they always say, “My spell check said it was OK.”


50 posted on 07/02/2010 2:28:30 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic (Southeast Wisconsin)
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