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UK treasure hunter finds 52,000 ancient Roman coins
Yahoo ^ | July 6, 2010 | Robert Barr

Posted on 07/08/2010 11:14:24 AM PDT by GeronL

LONDON – A treasure hunter has found about 52,500 Roman coins, one of the largest such discoveries ever in Britain, officials said Thursday.

The hoard, which was valued at 3.3 million pounds ($5 million), includes hundreds of coins bearing the image of Marcus Aurelius Carausius, who seized power in Britain and northern France in the late third century and proclaimed himself emperor.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: carausius; davecrisp; epigraphyandlanguage; frome; godsgravesglyphs; romanempire; somerset
wow.
1 posted on 07/08/2010 11:14:28 AM PDT by GeronL
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To: SunkenCiv

wow.

I guess he found the local Roman Treasury


2 posted on 07/08/2010 11:16:00 AM PDT by GeronL (Just say NO to conservativecave.com, it rots your teeth!)
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To: GeronL
The coins were buried in a large jar about a foot (30 centimeters) deep and weighed about 160 kilograms (350 pounds) in all. Crisp said a "funny signal" from his metal detector prompted him to start digging.

Fascinating...

3 posted on 07/08/2010 11:16:39 AM PDT by dragnet2
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To: dragnet2

Apparenty from the tail end of the Roman empire when it was breaking up.


4 posted on 07/08/2010 11:19:47 AM PDT by GeronL (Just say NO to conservativecave.com, it rots your teeth!)
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To: GeronL

I’ll bet that he has no claim to them. Maybe he will get a thank you from the government when they take them.


5 posted on 07/08/2010 11:20:07 AM PDT by FreePaul
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To: GeronL; SunkenCiv

Isn’t this Carausius guy one of the real-life historical figures whose stories were morphed together over the centuries to form the King Arthur legend?


6 posted on 07/08/2010 11:23:33 AM PDT by sinanju
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To: GeronL

Hey, that’s where I dropped my bag of old coins!!!


7 posted on 07/08/2010 11:24:18 AM PDT by bgill (how could a young man born here in Kenya, who is not even a native American, become the POTUS)
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To: GeronL
Cool ...

8 posted on 07/08/2010 11:24:47 AM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: bgill

they just happened to land in a big old Roman clay pot, huh?


9 posted on 07/08/2010 11:26:50 AM PDT by GeronL (Just say NO to conservativecave.com, it rots your teeth!)
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To: FreePaul

probably.


10 posted on 07/08/2010 11:27:52 AM PDT by GeronL (Just say NO to conservativecave.com, it rots your teeth!)
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To: oh8eleven

The coin on the left looks like it says ‘Septimus’.

The emperor Lucius Septimus Severus (who died in York reigned from 14 April 193 until his death in 211 AD.


11 posted on 07/08/2010 11:31:16 AM PDT by SMARTY ("What luck for rulers that men do not think." Adolph Hitler)
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To: oh8eleven

The coin on the left looks like it says ‘Septimus’.

The emperor Lucius Septimus Severus (who died in York) reigned from 14 April 193 until his death in 211 AD.


12 posted on 07/08/2010 11:31:48 AM PDT by SMARTY ("What luck for rulers that men do not think." Adolph Hitler)
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To: FreePaul

Incorrect.

He and the landowner will share the trove value, which is generally higher than any precious metal value of the coins. The ironclad provenance of these coins easily doubles their value.


13 posted on 07/08/2010 11:32:20 AM PDT by agere_contra (Obama did more damage to the Gulf economy in one day than Pemex/Ixtoc did in nine months)
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To: GeronL

Very noble of him to call the proper authorities and hand it over knowing that he will get nothing and instead it will be locked up somewhere or sold to pay for more fabulous British health care.


14 posted on 07/08/2010 11:34:09 AM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: GeronL

You’re probably correct.

On a side note, I’ve always thought the earth, just under the surface and oceans, holds many undiscovered, fantastic objects. More so than what most would imagine...Objects that would likely scare a lot of people and shatter a lot of beliefs. JMO.


15 posted on 07/08/2010 11:34:22 AM PDT by dragnet2
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To: sinanju
Not that I know of.

Lucius Artorius Castus was a Roman soldier (2nd or 3rd century) who is sometimes seen as a historical figure who became one source for the story of Arthur.

16 posted on 07/08/2010 11:35:13 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: GeronL

Mint condition.


17 posted on 07/08/2010 11:37:04 AM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: GeronL

I just unearthed a group of coins which are apparently constructed of cow dung and have the latin name “Obamus” on one side and “Idiotus” on the other.

Any opinion on the worth?


18 posted on 07/08/2010 11:38:37 AM PDT by Da Coyote
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To: GeronL

I wonder when a Barack coin will be proposed. Maybe a dollar piece, like the Susan B. Anthony octagonal coin,.


19 posted on 07/08/2010 11:39:27 AM PDT by Pearls Before Swine
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To: GeronL

I always enjoy reading about these discoveries.

The Hoxne and Staffordshire hoards are magnificent.

And I’ll have to say the U.K. has a pretty fair compensatory scheme for the finders.


20 posted on 07/08/2010 11:39:51 AM PDT by primeval patriot
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To: GeronL

Why, yes!


21 posted on 07/08/2010 11:40:16 AM PDT by bgill (how could a young man born here in Kenya, who is not even a native American, become the POTUS)
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To: GeronL

That should cover the British deficit;)


22 posted on 07/08/2010 11:40:43 AM PDT by sodpoodle (Despair - Man's surrender. Laughter - God's redemption)
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To: Da Coyote

“Any opinion on the worth?”

Negative value meaning you will owe.


23 posted on 07/08/2010 11:41:24 AM PDT by traderrob6
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To: GeronL
Must be fun to do some treasure hunting in places like the UK, where there is the potential for something like this.

As a kid I had a cheap Radio Shack metal detector, and collected coins, and dreamed of finding something like this.

Of course, about the biggest find I ever had was spoon in my grandmother's back yard...

24 posted on 07/08/2010 11:41:59 AM PDT by Mannaggia l'America
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To: GeronL

Avoidance of taxes is a long tradition...................


25 posted on 07/08/2010 11:42:14 AM PDT by Red Badger (No, Obama's not the Antichrist. He's just some guy in the neighborhood.............)
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To: sinanju

Not exactly, Geoffrey of Monmouth (From whom the Arthurian legend is believed to orginated from) created a legend around him which suggested he was British-Born (he was in fact a Gaul, but Gaul and Britain were so similar at this point that the difference is hardly relevant) and that he seized control of Britain from Bassianus (Caracalla) who lived and died before Carausius was even born.
In fact Carausius was in charge of the Classis Britannica (a large Roman Fleet based in Britain) and rebelled against Diolcletian’s co-emperor Maximian in 286, he successfully resisted Rome’s attempts to to re-conquer Britain (which may explain Geoffrey of Monmouth’s attempt to build a pro-English/British legend around him juxtaposed with a legendarily evil Emperor like Caracalla) until he was assassinated by his own treasurer Allectus, who lost the Britain back to Rome in 293.
Still quite an interesting character though. He is responsible for the earliest coins minted in London, and I’ve had the privilege of handling many of them (not from this hoard though)...


26 posted on 07/08/2010 11:46:55 AM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: sinsofsolarempirefan

I always wondered if Roman Britain ever had a chance to stand on it’s own?

The official line is that it was not economically self-sustaining and that the Britons were never really romanized.


27 posted on 07/08/2010 11:51:24 AM PDT by sinanju
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To: GeronL
"they just happened to land in a big old Roman clay pot, huh? "

I guess that sleeze-bag, former Rep. William J. Jefferson (D-La.), must be descended from the original owner of the clay pot?

28 posted on 07/08/2010 11:52:07 AM PDT by SuperLuminal (Where is another agitator for republicanism like Sam Adams when we need him?)
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To: FreePaul
I’ll bet that he has no claim to them. Maybe he will get a thank you from the government when they take them.

From what I understand, the British government may take the coins, but they are pretty good at paying a fair market value for them. They don't want people finding them and smuggling them out of the country to sell them, like would happen if they just confiscated them without payment.

29 posted on 07/08/2010 11:53:10 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (Gun control was originally to protect Klansmen from their victims. The basic reason hasn't changed.)
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To: Pan_Yan
Very noble of him to call the proper authorities and hand it over knowing that he will get nothing and instead it will be locked up somewhere or sold to pay for more fabulous British health care.

Actually, that is a load of rubbish. If they are declared Treasure Trove by the County Coroner, he will share the full commercial value of the coins with the landowner. Not only is this extremely fair, but it dissuades people who find these hoards from disappearing with what they find, cheating the landowner and robbing archeologists of the chance to properly analyze the find and put it in an historical context to learn more about history from this period. It is especially important to have a policy like this with coins of the late third century because Rome was in a state of chaos during this period and left relatively few surviving historical records and much of what we know about Britain in this period is derived from the coins that the Romans/RomanoBritish left behind...

30 posted on 07/08/2010 11:54:26 AM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: Pan_Yan
Very noble of him to call the proper authorities and hand it over knowing that he will get nothing and instead it will be locked up somewhere or sold to pay for more fabulous British health care.

Actually, that is a load of rubbish. If they are declared Treasure Trove by the County Coroner, he will share the full commercial value of the coins with the landowner. Not only is this extremely fair, but it dissuades people who find these hoards from disappearing with what they find, cheating the landowner and robbing archeologists of the chance to properly analyze the find and put it in an historical context to learn more about history from this period. It is especially important to have a policy like this with coins of the late third century because Rome was in a state of chaos during this period and left relatively few surviving historical records and much of what we know about Britain in this period is derived from the coins that the Romans/RomanoBritish left behind...

31 posted on 07/08/2010 11:54:39 AM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: GeronL; sinanju

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Thanks GeronL. sinanju, Carausius was a Roman general or governor who took Britain independent during the chaotic 3rd c. His connection to the Arthur story might consist of his having run the place from Colchester, which in Roman times was known as Camulodunum ("Camelot"). He's also found in one of the series of novels by Rosemary Sutcliff, and I think at least one of those has been made into a movie in recent years. Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

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32 posted on 07/08/2010 11:55:10 AM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Pan_Yan
Mea Culpa. He'll get something.
33 posted on 07/08/2010 11:56:17 AM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: sinsofsolarempirefan

Yeah, yeah, yeah. I looked it up. I admit it, I was wrong.


34 posted on 07/08/2010 11:57:36 AM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: sinsofsolarempirefan

Moreover, the value of the find is enhanced by the provenance given to it by the archaeologists.

A pile of roman coins in a jam jar is not worth that much. A properly retrieved trove is another matter.


35 posted on 07/08/2010 11:58:09 AM PDT by agere_contra (Obama did more damage to the Gulf economy in one day than Pemex/Ixtoc did in nine months)
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To: sinanju
The Romans were pretty well Romanised at this point. Britain (along with other provinces) broke away from Rome on two occasions during the chaotic late third Century. In 268 under Postumus, as part of the seccessionis Anglo-Gallic Empire, and again under Carausius in 286.
On both of these occasions, the rebellious governments formed themselves along Roman lines, with Roman style coinage, a Senate, and Roman-Style armies (indeed, the secessionist 'Emperors' were Roman Military commanders who rebelled.

One of the chief reasons why provinces like Britain were willing to support seccesion was that, due to the chaos and civil war that was ravaging Rome at this time, Rome was unable to protect backwater provinces like Britain from raiding barbarians and pirates, because the various Roman Emperors where too busy fighting other pretenders, rival emperors, barbarians and usurpers closer to home. The secessionist Emperors were relatively successful because they could focus on outside threats more because they were based more locally and were willing to focus more resources on protect Britain and Gaul's borders from pirates and Barbarians.

It wasn't until 410 that Rome finally and formally abdicated its responsibility towards Britain and told the RomanBritish that they were on their own and to look to their own defences. Shortly afterwards, the Angles, Jutes and Saxons started arriving in droves and eventually occupied what is now England drove out the natives (or at least their culture) and took it over...

36 posted on 07/08/2010 12:09:52 PM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: sinanju
The British were pretty well Romanised at this point. Britain (along with other provinces) broke away from Rome on two occasions during the chaotic late third Century. In 268 under Postumus, as part of the seccessionis Anglo-Gallic Empire, and again under Carausius in 286.
On both of these occasions, the rebellious governments formed themselves along Roman lines, with Roman style coinage, a Senate, and Roman-Style armies (indeed, the secessionist 'Emperors' were Roman Military commanders who rebelled.

One of the chief reasons why provinces like Britain were willing to support seccesion was that, due to the chaos and civil war that was ravaging Rome at this time, Rome was unable to protect backwater provinces like Britain from raiding barbarians and pirates, because the various Roman Emperors where too busy fighting other pretenders, rival emperors, barbarians and usurpers closer to home. The secessionist Emperors were relatively successful because they could focus on outside threats more because they were based more locally and were willing to focus more resources on protect Britain and Gaul's borders from pirates and Barbarians.

It wasn't until 410 that Rome finally and formally abdicated its responsibility towards Britain and told the RomanBritish that they were on their own and to look to their own defences. Shortly afterwards, the Angles, Jutes and Saxons started arriving in droves and eventually occupied what is now England drove out the natives (or at least their culture) and took it over...

37 posted on 07/08/2010 12:10:09 PM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: agere_contra

Certainly makes my job easier...:)


38 posted on 07/08/2010 12:14:16 PM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: Da Coyote
Any opinion on the worth?

The article said something like 5 million dollars.

Talk about finding buried treasure!

39 posted on 07/08/2010 12:30:03 PM PDT by painter (No wonder democrats don't mind taxes.THEY DON'T PAY THEM !)
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To: Pan_Yan
Treasure hunter unearths Britain's largest ever hoard of Roman coins

"Under the 1996 Treasure Act, anyone who finds a group of buried coins has to declare it to the coroner within two weeks. If the coins are bought, as planned, by the Museum of Somerset, the reward will shared between Mr Crisp and the landowner."

40 posted on 07/08/2010 12:36:52 PM PDT by Stentor
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To: Pearls Before Swine

“I wonder when a Barack coin will be proposed. Maybe a dollar piece, like the Susan B. Anthony octagonal coin.”

More like a candy coin wrapped in foil and made out of exlax.


41 posted on 07/08/2010 12:52:51 PM PDT by Yehuda (Land of the free, THANKS TO THE BRAVE!)
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Carausius was the commander of the Roman North Sea Fleet who siezed control of Britain in AD286 and proclaimed himself emperor. He was treacherously slain later that same year by his trusted first-minister and treasurer Allectus. Allectus, whom he had put in charge of his treasury, assassinated him and assumed power himself.[10] His reign would last only three years, after which he was defeated and killed by Constantius’s subordinate Julius Asclepiodotus.[11]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carausius


42 posted on 07/08/2010 12:58:22 PM PDT by anglian
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To: Pan_Yan
Very noble of him to call the proper authorities and hand it over knowing that he will get nothing and instead it will be locked up somewhere or sold to pay for more fabulous British health care.

Under English Common Law treasure trove belongs to the Queen, unless someone can prove the treasure belongs to them, i.e. he is the one, or the heir of the one, who hid it. Concealing the fact you found a treasure is a misdemeanor and punishable by fines and a prison term.

In practice the government goes over the treasure, takes the items it feels like keeping, pays the finder for them, and returns everything else to the finder. But you have to report your find to have any chance of getting good title to it.

43 posted on 07/08/2010 1:15:44 PM PDT by Cheburashka (Stephen Decatur: you want barrels of gunpowder as tribute, you must expect cannonballs with it.)
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To: GeronL

Good news you found 52000 thousand of old roman coins bads news they are worth less because there are 52000 more of them on the market.

I would have kept my mouth shut and sold them off a few at a time to keep the value high


44 posted on 07/08/2010 1:24:56 PM PDT by edzo4 (You call us the 'Party Of No', I call us the resistance.)
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To: edzo4

Yes, the market is clogged now.


45 posted on 07/08/2010 1:38:26 PM PDT by GeronL (Just say NO to TV, it rots your brain!)
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To: dragnet2
just under the surface and oceans, holds many undiscovered, fantastic objects.


46 posted on 07/08/2010 11:06:53 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: GeronL
Here's a short video clip of Mr. Crisp, the happy hobbyist.

Metal detector finds buried Roman treasure

47 posted on 07/22/2010 7:03:33 PM PDT by csvset
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