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Canada's economy can teach the U.S. a thing or two (Why our Northern Neighbor is in fine shape)
Los Angeles Times ^ | 07/12/2010 | Don Lee

Posted on 07/12/2010 7:35:35 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

The United States will probably take years to recover from the global recession and credit crunch, economists say, but its northern neighbor is back in fine shape.

Whatever else they've thought about their much smaller neighbor to the north, Americans have almost never looked to Canada as a role model.

Indeed, during the long, bitter push to revamp the U.S. healthcare system, opponents repeatedly warned that, if we weren't careful, we could end up with a medical system like Canada's.

But on healthcare, as well as on such critical issues as the deficit, unemployment, immigration and prospering in the global economy, Canada seems to be outperforming the United States. And in doing so, it is offering examples of successful strategies that Americans might consider.

While the United States, Japan and much of Europe are struggling with massive fiscal deficits, Canada's financial house is tidy and secure. Most economists say it will take years for the United States to make up the 8 million-plus jobs lost during the recession, but Canada — despite its historic role as a major supplier for the still-troubled U.S. auto industry — already has recovered essentially all of the jobs it lost.

Meanwhile, as Americans continue their grueling battle over immigration, Canadians have united behind a policy that emphasizes opening the door to tens of thousands of skilled professionals, entrepreneurs and other productive workers who have played an important role in strengthening the Canadian economy.

Granted, Canada's problem with illegal immigration is smaller, and its economy does not match the scale and dynamic productivity of the world's largest. But on the most troubling issues of the day, the U.S. is locked in near-paralyzing political and ideological debates, while those same issues are hardly raising eyebrows in Canada.

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: canada; economy; usa
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1 posted on 07/12/2010 7:35:37 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Earlier that decade, Canada too was straining from years of excessive government spending that bloated the nation’s total debts, to 70% of annual economic output — a figure the U.S. is projected to approach in two years.

As with Greece, Portugal and Spain this year, Canada’s credit rating was downgraded in the early 1990s, sharply raising its borrowing costs. With its economy suffering and pressure mounting from international investors — Wall Street bankers in particular — Canadian officials slashed spending for social programs and shifted more of the cost burden to provincial governments, which almost everyone in Canada felt.

It would take several years of such tough medicine, but as Canada headed into the new millennium, the government’s total debts were shaved nearly in half, and then whittled down to a little more than 20% of gross domestic product just before the global recession began in 2008 — by far the lowest ratio among major developed countries.

With the economic downturn, Canada pumped up public spending to stimulate growth, as other nations did. Even so, its fiscal shortfall this year is projected at $33 billion, comfortably below the 3%-of-GDP threshold that economists consider a manageable level of debt.

Washington’s deficit this fiscal year is estimated by the Congressional Budget Office at $1.35 trillion — or 9.2% of projected GDP.

The United States’ larger size — its population and economy are roughly 10 times those of Canada — makes direct comparisons difficult. And many Canadians readily acknowledge that American entrepreneurship and productivity are enviably stronger.

But having learned to tighten their belts in the 1990s, Canadians have little sympathy for U.S. consumers who pile debt onto their credit cards and homes.


2 posted on 07/12/2010 7:36:51 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Canadian banks have been more conservative than American ones. So they made few subprime loans, and home equity lines are relatively recent offerings in Canada.

Yet their solid if unexciting product lines and financial results mean Canadian firms can now expand lending. This as U.S. banks continue to refrain from extending credit, thus restraining spending, investment and job growth.

Canada has been receiving about 250,000 permanent residents annually. About one-fourth of the new arrivals gain entry through family relations, but more than 60% are admitted as “economic immigrants” — that is, skilled workers, entrepreneurs and investors.

In the U.S., it’s basically the reverse: Most of the 1 million-plus permanent residents received annually have been family-sponsored; only about one in seven are admitted on the basis of employment preferences.

That is, Washington emphasizes bringing in family members of immigrants already in the United States. Ottawa put the emphasis on admitting those who can contribute to the economy.


3 posted on 07/12/2010 7:38:11 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Well, the former Canaduh doesn’t have Bwwannny and Chris screwing up their banking system. It doesn’t have a Marxist Zer0 fearless leader waging war on the country, doesn’t have a large military to feed, likely has a reasonable balance of payments/trade, is willing to drill, baby, distill, etc.


4 posted on 07/12/2010 7:40:38 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: SeekAndFind

Canada also does not have our President, his czars or the Democratic Party that we have that are ripping off the American people.


5 posted on 07/12/2010 7:40:51 AM PDT by RC2
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To: SeekAndFind
I go to Canada frequently and we do not want their immigration policy in any way. It is chock full of Muslims and there are already many Muslim ghettos in Toronto and Montreal. There is no assimilation of immigrants and there is no national Canadian identity to speak of. Yes they have a much smaller illegal immigration issue but they have unlimited legal Muslim immigration. Even the so called qualified immigrants that show up in Canada often find their foreign degrees and work experience not recognized and you have Ph D's driving cabs.

Their banking and mortgage system is indeed better as they don't force banks to loan money to deadbeats that can't pay. 20% down is routine and there was never a bubble like the USA.

6 posted on 07/12/2010 7:44:26 AM PDT by Maneesh
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To: SeekAndFind
Canada has three advantages we don't have:

1. A long, porous border with a third world country.
2. They actually WILL extract and use their natural resources.
3. We provide for them something along the lines of $60 BILLION a year in military aid, since they have no real standing military and count on us to provide for their safety.

7 posted on 07/12/2010 7:45:09 AM PDT by South Hawthorne (In Memory of my Dear Friend Henry Lee II)
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To: Owl_Eagle

Excellent points, there are some aspects of Canada we can emulate but NOT their immigration policy as the article indicates. And certainly not their insane tax system. 13% national sales tax and marginal tax rate of 49% above $110,000 / yr. Bad as it is our tax system is still far better.


8 posted on 07/12/2010 7:47:46 AM PDT by Maneesh
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To: Owl_Eagle

Excellent points, there are some aspects of Canada we can emulate but NOT their immigration policy as the article indicates. And certainly not their insane tax system. 13% national sales tax and marginal tax rate of 49% above $110,000 / yr. Bad as it is our tax system is still far better.


9 posted on 07/12/2010 7:47:53 AM PDT by Maneesh
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To: SeekAndFind
I've done business on both sides of the border for years, and my take on this article is that it raises good points but also overlooks some very important ones.

Canada isn't just substantially smaller than the U.S. in terms of population (the U.S. has about 10x more people), but the Canadian economy is very different from ours. They are very resource-oriented and production-oriented up there, with so much of their economy tied to foreign trade. I may be wrong about this, but I believe the single biggest factor in Canada's relatively strong economy is that prices for all kinds of commodities that are produced in abundance in Canada (oil being a good example) have risen dramatically in the last few years. I'm not sure this can go on indefinitely, as high prices ultimately crimp demand and may result in declining economic fortunes in various business sectors (lumber prices have apparently dropped significantly in recent months).

10 posted on 07/12/2010 7:51:20 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("Let the Eastern bastards freeze in the dark.")
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To: SeekAndFind

Things change, and our thing will start changing after the November elections. There will be belt tightening here, but also a loosening of the noose around growth’s neck. Canada is turning around to head the right direction politically and economically, but they will experience a horrible cultural rot, if they don’t curtail Islamic immigration.


11 posted on 07/12/2010 7:52:20 AM PDT by pallis
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To: SeekAndFind
We need a guy like this to put liberals in their place:


12 posted on 07/12/2010 7:52:37 AM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: Last Dakotan

Who are you referring to ?


13 posted on 07/12/2010 7:53:15 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Its impressive how the LAT makes no mention of how Canada is the largest supplier of oil to the United States. That is a unique phenomena of the past decade and a brilliant byproduct of great foreign policy moves by Bush.

More importantly, the development of fossil fuel as a product can propel an economy with tens of billions of dollars in economic activity .

But the LAT leaves that out rather deliberately.


14 posted on 07/12/2010 7:55:58 AM PDT by lonestar67 ("I love my country a lot more than I love politics," President George W. Bush)
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To: SeekAndFind

Our northern neighbors are doing just ducky at least partially because 1) they don’t have to spend a nickel on defense and 2) because they live next door to the largest,most prosperous,productive and vibrant market on earth.


15 posted on 07/12/2010 7:58:05 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (''I don't regret setting bombs,I feel we didn't do enough.'' ->Bill Ayers,Hussein's mentor,9/11/01)
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To: SeekAndFind; Paladin2; RC2

I’ve read of Canada’s value-added, “point-based” immigration system before. However, at the same time, their refugee-status determination policies are way too loose and have made Canada a terrorist entrepot and have everything to do with why so many terrorists entered Canada first before trying to sneak South.

We would also benefit greatly from REAL immigration reform. I know from my father’s many Russian friends over the years what a red-tape monstrosity the current system we have for “legit” immigration is (think an average of a dozen years, twenty-thousand bucks and countless man-hours spent making appointments, gathering paperwork and standing in line).

That said, I have a real problem with the H1-B system. I’ve heard too much about the “Indian Mafia” that prevails in the IT world. For H1-B reform, I would go with the proposal another FReeper tossed out a few years back: companies in question could sponsor ALL the H1-B’ers they want too, but the supposedly vitally-needed workers in question would be free to work for ANY employer they chose over the duration of their visa. The companies in question would be free to add to the employment pool of the skill in question but they would NOT have any indentured slaves to toil for them at sub-par wages.


16 posted on 07/12/2010 7:58:22 AM PDT by sinanju
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To: SeekAndFind
The key to Canada's lack of financial trouble is just that. They did just the opposite of what the USA did in regards to scams like Fannie May and Freddie Mack. They tightened up on their lending and left the banks to handle their own funding of the loans they made. “Sub-Prime” loans were not allowed and a substantial down payment and investment from the borrower was required to secure all loans made.

This IS the key to a healthy financial system. The stronger economic system they enjoy, follows as a result.

In addition to that, Canada has always had the USA to defend this Continent and has spent very little of their tax revenues on their military.

Another major difference is Canada's urban structure. The country is mostly rural and smaller towns and communities. These communities are supported by stable industries like logging, oil, manufacturing, trucking, agriculture and small business. They also do not have to deal with the out of control welfare system or millions of illegal immigrants. And, smaller rural communities tend to have a stronger sense of accountability and national pride.

Not only that, Canada's Welfare system requires accountability and repayment to anyone resorting to it. So, most Canadians only use it as a last ditch option and they have very few generational/professional welfare recipients.

17 posted on 07/12/2010 8:01:09 AM PDT by PSYCHO-FREEP ( Give me Liberty, or give me an M-24A2!)
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To: SeekAndFind
But on healthcare, as well as on such critical issues as the deficit, unemployment, immigration and prospering in the global economy, Canada seems to be outperforming the United States.

Healthcare in Canada is a joke. We are heading that way as well with Dr. Goodwrench in the WH.

18 posted on 07/12/2010 8:02:12 AM PDT by frogjerk (I believe in unicorns, fairies and pro-life Democrats.)
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To: sinanju
The companies in question would be free to add to the employment pool of the skill in question but they would NOT have any indentured slaves to toil for them at sub-par wages.

Can you explain to us how that will be good for the many IT workers in the USA ( not Indians, but citizens ) who are looking for work themselves at a time of high unemployment?
19 posted on 07/12/2010 8:02:48 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: PSYCHO-FREEP

Does Canada have an Estate Tax ? ( AKA as the Death Tax )


20 posted on 07/12/2010 8:04:30 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

It means that H1-B imports will have to be paid the prevailing wage and won’t undercut U.S. citizens with the same skills.


21 posted on 07/12/2010 8:08:34 AM PDT by sinanju
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To: SeekAndFind

I am not sure about that. I do not think they do however because I know several who moved there to retire and after they passed, their kids inherited their property and did not complain.


22 posted on 07/12/2010 8:08:51 AM PDT by PSYCHO-FREEP ( Give me Liberty, or give me an M-24A2!)
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To: PSYCHO-FREEP

Good points except your comments on the welfare system. It is very generous in Canada and there are entire towns with generational welfare recipients. The canadian mindset is far more socialist and govt has a far bigger role in life and there is very little opposition to that from the people.


23 posted on 07/12/2010 8:11:39 AM PDT by Maneesh
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To: SeekAndFind

Simple. Canada does not have Freddie and Fannie and Barney.


24 posted on 07/12/2010 8:12:39 AM PDT by screaminsunshine (m)
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To: SeekAndFind

This article has quite a bit of BS, our immigration policy is foolish, for one.


25 posted on 07/12/2010 8:16:26 AM PDT by Catholic Canadian
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To: PSYCHO-FREEP
Another major difference is Canada's urban structure. The country is mostly rural and smaller towns and communities.

This is an interesting point. Most of Canada's land mass is rural, but most of its population lives in urban areas. I did a quick calculation using some figures available online, and based on this information it looks like about half of Canada's entire population lives in its ten largest metropolitan areas. These include the following:

Toronto (5 million)
Montreal (4 million)
Vancouver (2 million)
Ottawa (1 million)
Calgary (1 million)
Edmonton (1 million)
Quebec (700,000)
Winnipeg (700,000)
Hamilton (700,000)
London (500,000)

That total comes to more than 16.5 million people -- out of a total population of around 33-34 million.

26 posted on 07/12/2010 8:18:34 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("Let the Eastern bastards freeze in the dark.")
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To: SeekAndFind

Maybe it’s because they don’t have obama, pelosi, and reed...


27 posted on 07/12/2010 8:30:37 AM PDT by MissEdie (America went to the polls on 11-4-08 and all we got was a socialist thug and a dottering old fool.)
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To: SeekAndFind; ding_dong_daddy_from_dumas; stephenjohnbanker; DoughtyOne; FromLori; Gilbo_3; ...
RE :”Its approach to immigration is one example. With one of the highest immigration rates in the world, Canada has been receiving about 250,000 permanent residents annually. About one-fourth of the new arrivals gain entry through family relations, but more than 60% are admitted as “economic immigrants” — that is, skilled workers, entrepreneurs and investors. In the U.S., it's basically the reverse: Most of the 1 million-plus permanent residents received annually have been family-sponsored; only about one in seven are admitted on the basis of employment preferences. That is, Washington emphasizes bringing in family members of immigrants already in the United States. Ottawa put the emphasis on admitting those who can contribute to the economy

We admit those that can go on the US dole versus contributing. Every young immigrant (came in as a child) I know of got free college in Maryland and gives their loyalty to the welfare state, job or no job. Their parents came in with no education, naturally.

28 posted on 07/12/2010 8:35:53 AM PDT by sickoflibs ( "It's not the taxes, the redistribution is the federal spending=tax delayed")
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To: Alberta's Child
This is true of most modern countries these days. But I see the difference as still fewer ratios of people living in mass urban areas like the USA, where over two thirds of the population are crammed into small areas with little room between.

Canada's population is about half urban, half rural and the cities are spread quite far apart with many smaller and clean support communities between.

The Welfare communities you must refer to are some of the Arctic/Indian villages, as well as Churchill, Hudson Bay towns with very little economic stability. And yes, Canadian Socialism is completely in control of the population in these dependent/recipient based economies.

I may have jumped the shark by saying that welfare funds are paid back to the government to some who need it, because this is information I gathered from some Canadian friends I have in Manitoba. Please excuse my error if I am wrong here and I would appreciate the correct information If you are able. Thanks FRiend.

29 posted on 07/12/2010 8:38:35 AM PDT by PSYCHO-FREEP ( Give me Liberty, or give me an M-24A2!)
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To: SeekAndFind

What tripe!

“Meanwhile, as Americans continue their grueling battle over immigration, Canadians have united behind a policy that emphasizes opening the door to tens of thousands of skilled professionals, entrepreneurs and other productive workers who have played an important role in strengthening the Canadian economy.”

Yea the US is having a problem is software engineers, lawyers, and doctors shuffling across the sourthern border...


30 posted on 07/12/2010 8:47:48 AM PDT by N3WBI3 (Ah, arrogance and stupidity all in the same package. How efficient of you. -- Londo Mollari)
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To: Alberta's Child

“(lumber prices have apparently dropped significantly in recent months).”

Lumber has dropped since April because when prices climbed , due to a short term increase in demand , the mills all increased production. Demand then fell in April when the US housing credit expired.
However, Canada is much more friendly to using its natural resouces like timber. British Columbia and Alberta have been very proactive in cutting the dead beattle kill Lodgepole pine in their provences. To the contrary, the beattle kill dead timber in the US on federal lands will burn or rot before it is ever cut.


31 posted on 07/12/2010 8:53:36 AM PDT by woodbutcher1963
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To: SeekAndFind
Canada has not run out of other peoples money YET...
Probably because of being under Americas military UMBRELLA...

In a real world Canada couldn't afford socialism..
Their exports support their socialism as does Finlands, Swedens and Norways..

American democrats are for ratcheting up socialism and killing american exports..ON PURPOSE..
Thereby not feeding the goose and stealing the eggs..

The American goose is getting skinny and producing fewer and smaller eggs.. Soon the republicans will take over so there will be somebody to blame it all on..

A new republican Congress(2010) will find a way to NOT REDUCE THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, NOT reduce taxes... AND NOT prune the federal government down to manageable size....

32 posted on 07/12/2010 8:53:45 AM PDT by hosepipe (This propaganda has been edited to include some fully orbed hyperbole....)
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To: PSYCHO-FREEP

Very good points there. I didn’t include any mention of “welfare communities” in my post, so I’m guessing you were referring to another post on this thread. Your points about parts of Canada with a welfare culture are good, too. I would suggest that the entire region of the Maritime Provinces is heavily dependent on government support — and that includes both Canadian and aboriginal areas.


33 posted on 07/12/2010 9:12:24 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("Let the Eastern bastards freeze in the dark.")
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To: Owl_Eagle
Canada has three advantages we don't have: 1. A long, porous border with a third world country.

I think you mean: "No long, porous border with a third-world country."

Regards,

34 posted on 07/12/2010 9:21:10 AM PDT by alexander_busek
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To: alexander_busek
I think you mean: "No long, porous border with a third-world country."

Give the democrats a couple more years...

35 posted on 07/12/2010 9:24:30 AM PDT by meyer (Big government is the enemy of freedom.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Canada’s finance minister;

http://www.fin.gc.ca/comment/minfin-eng.asp


36 posted on 07/12/2010 9:30:57 AM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: PSYCHO-FREEP; Alberta's Child
The Welfare communities you must refer to are some of the Arctic/Indian villages, as well as Churchill, Hudson Bay towns with very little economic stability. And yes, Canadian Socialism is completely in control of the population in these dependent/recipient based economies.

Not really, they are everywhere. Several here in Ottawa alone. Vanier, Bayshore, and City View for example. I personally have a cousin who has been on/off welfare all his life, and has around 5 kids, who all have kids, living the same way. It makes me sick. They were living in Southern Ontario, but get this.....moved to Sudbury because the payments were higher there.

37 posted on 07/12/2010 9:35:55 AM PDT by fanfan (Why did they bury Barry's past?)
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To: Maneesh
13% national sales tax

Nope, try 5%.

38 posted on 07/12/2010 9:39:49 AM PDT by kanawa (Obama - "It's going to take a while for us to dig ourselves out of this hole.'')
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To: kanawa

Effective July 1 there is a HST : harmonized sales tax which is the combination of the provincial sals tax (PST) and General sales tax (GST) and that is 13%. The feds keep 5% and the states keep 8 but the total is still 13. You can verify this at any govt source, I go to Canada frequently and am 100% sure of this.


39 posted on 07/12/2010 9:42:22 AM PDT by Maneesh
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To: Gay State Conservative
they don’t have to spend a nickel on defense

/facepalm

because they live next door to the largest,most prosperous,productive and vibrant market on earth.

Which makes it all the more surprising to me
that we are doing well while you're in difficulty.

Usually if you caught a cold, we got pneumonia

40 posted on 07/12/2010 9:45:53 AM PDT by kanawa (Obama - "It's going to take a while for us to dig ourselves out of this hole.'')
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To: Maneesh
You can verify this at any govt source, I go to Canada frequently and am 100% sure of this.

The provincial sales tax is not a national tax.
The GST is a national tax.
The HST is supposed to make it easier
more economical to collect the two taxes.
Provincial sales taxes vary by province.
Indeed in Alberta for example there is no PST.
As well some provinces haven't implemented the HST...


(1) BC will combine the PST with GST for a single value-added tax, 12% HST, effective July 1, 2010.
(2) The sales tax is applied to the total of the selling price plus the GST. The 2009 Québec budget proposes an increase to 8.5% effective January 1, 2011. The 2010 Québec budget proposes an increase to 9.5% effective January 1, 2012.
(3) The GST rate was reduced to 5%, and HST to 13% effective January 1, 2008. They were previously reduced from 7% and 15% to 6% and 14% effective July 1, 2006.
(4) Saskatchewan PST rate reduced from 7% to 5% for all sales made on or after October 28, 2006.
(5) Ontario will combine the retail sales tax with GST for a single value-added tax, 13% HST, effective July 1, 2010.
(6) Nova Scotia announced in their 2010 Budget that their HST rate will increase to 15%, effective July 1, 2010.
(7) The sales tax in PE is applied to the total of the selling price plus the GST.
link

41 posted on 07/12/2010 9:59:42 AM PDT by kanawa (Obama - "It's going to take a while for us to dig ourselves out of this hole.'')
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To: Maneesh

It looks to me like your talking about Ontario.
Indeed on July 1 the PST and the GST were for the purpose of collection combined into the HST.
Unfortunately I am well aware of it, being that I live there.
What makes it particularly onerous and odious to me
is that Ontario didn’t not remove the existing provincial ST on gasoline
resulting in a case of double taxation of gas on the provincial level.
Since 50% of my business expense is gasoline
I’m not too happy with the resultant ~8% increase in fuel cost.
The Liberals in charge touted the HST as away to make provincial businesses more competitive.
I see it as a 4% decrease in my net income.


42 posted on 07/12/2010 10:12:30 AM PDT by kanawa (Obama - "It's going to take a while for us to dig ourselves out of this hole.'')
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To: kanawa

Yes I was primarily talking about Ontario and in addition to gasoline the new HST hits new home sales as well. My understanding is that although the total of 13% is less than the old GST + PST, the HST now hits ALL goods and services so consumers end up paying more overall.

Gasoline is something everyone uses and I noticed that gas prices went up 10 cents a litre to about $1 a liter right after Jul 1.


43 posted on 07/12/2010 11:13:51 AM PDT by Maneesh
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To: SeekAndFind

Canada’s economy is sound largely because of Free Trade, the Goods and Services tax (GST - essentially a flat tax on everything you buy) and because our banks are far more conservative. All of these policies were enacted by a Conservative government (Mulroney in the 1984-1993), and Canada is currently run by a conservative government (Harper since 2006). The Liberals were against Free Trade and the GST and ran campaigns against both policies, but like the hypocrites they are, after making them highly unpopular policies they managed to win in 1993 running against the GST, yet they still kept both policies in place. Add to that our vast resources with massive oil and natural gas reserves, and it isn’t too tuff to figure it out. We sell more oil to the United States than Saudi Arabia does… We’ve got money.


44 posted on 07/12/2010 12:18:28 PM PDT by jerod (They were Socialist, Pro-Abortionist, Gun Control Nuts & excessive Environmentalist -the NAZI party)
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To: jerod
like the hypocrites they are, after making them highly unpopular policies they managed to win in 1993 running against the GST, yet they still kept both policies in place.

Yep, and then came Harper and he lowered the rate from 7% to 5%.

45 posted on 07/12/2010 12:50:41 PM PDT by kanawa (Obama - "It's going to take a while for us to dig ourselves out of this hole.'')
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To: kanawa
they don’t have to spend a nickel on defense../facepalm

Canada is larger in land area (meaning territory to be defended) than is the US.Calculate how much Canada spends...per square kilometer to be defended...on defense and compare it to our expenditures on the same basis.How much more do we spend than you? Twenty times,perhaps?

You know darn well that your Ministry of Defense Headquarters isn't located in Ottawa.It isn't even located in Canada.It's located in Alexandria,Virginia,USA.

46 posted on 07/12/2010 1:32:01 PM PDT by Gay State Conservative (''I don't regret setting bombs,I feel we didn't do enough.'' ->Bill Ayers,Hussein's mentor,9/11/01)
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To: Maneesh

Canada still has a long way to go on gun “control” and on free speech. Multicultural issues too (beyond French and pre-French natives).


47 posted on 07/12/2010 1:43:57 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Paladin2

It is hard to deny that canada weathered the recession ten times better than the americans when it should have been the opposite. They weathered it pretty well better than anyone save maybe the aussies. Whatever the reasons, there are lessons to be learned and americans should pay heed.
Ontario does suck. I live in the cesspool.
We have a liberal premier Dalton Mohammed Mcguinty who continues to tax us to death. He makes bad decision after bad decsion bringing in too many canadians of convenience to secure votes and we pay for it.
He must go. Like I said. He’s a liberal. Just like
a democrat...but even more left.


48 posted on 07/12/2010 5:34:06 PM PDT by celtictomcat
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To: Catholic Canadian

Now you are an economist? Hurry while you still know it all, the world is hanging on every word.


49 posted on 02/06/2011 4:17:39 PM PST by spookay (Just the facts ma'am.)
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To: Catholic Canadian

Now you are an economist? Hurry while you still know it all, the world is hanging on every word.


50 posted on 02/06/2011 4:17:49 PM PST by spookay (Just the facts ma'am.)
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