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'Blue Screen of Death' on Oil Rig's Computer ( Deepwater Horizon Oilspill )
HardOCP ^ | Saturday July 24, 2010 | Al

Posted on 07/24/2010 10:30:38 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Testifying at a federal hearing on Friday, the chief electronics technician told of numerous instances of a "Blue Screen of Death" on the computer system responsible for monitoring and controlling drilling. The largest oil spill in American history may be due to a simple computer glitch.

The machine had been locking up for months, Williams said, producing what he and others on the crew called a "blue screen of death." "It would just turn blue. You'd have no data coming through," Williams said today, according to the New York Times' story. With the computer frozen, the driller would not have access to crucial data about what was going on in the well.


(Excerpt) Read more at hardocp.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; News/Current Events; US: Louisiana
KEYWORDS: oilspill
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Obama Administration to Sue Microsoft for Oil Spill


51 posted on 07/24/2010 11:13:47 AM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I'd like to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you.)
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To: P8riot
That is a pretty good testimonial for SUSE.

Lot's of PC's out there still running Novell's PC DOS software....think of gnarly years old PC's in Auto Repair shops...where the big usage is pulling up part's manuals.

52 posted on 07/24/2010 11:14:13 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: P8riot

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA !!!

Never heard that before.

Outstanding!

And ever so sadly.... too true.


53 posted on 07/24/2010 11:14:47 AM PDT by RachelFaith (2010 is going to be a 100 seat Tsunami - Unless the GOP Senate ruins it all...)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

LOL..

Where’s muh ‘’Abort, Retry, ‘Epic’ Fail’’ button?

The WH must have one or two popping up every day.


54 posted on 07/24/2010 11:15:45 AM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi ... Godspeed .. Monthly Donor Onboard)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I have some servers hosted in France than came with ubuntu and I remotely changed them to SUZE and have a VM copy on my Mac. Suze is an outstandingly rock solid OS.


55 posted on 07/24/2010 11:18:05 AM PDT by RachelFaith (2010 is going to be a 100 seat Tsunami - Unless the GOP Senate ruins it all...)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

We’re pretty happy with it.


56 posted on 07/24/2010 11:18:48 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.....Eagle scout since Sep 9, 1970)
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To: RachelFaith

Courtesy of my Bro-in-Law, a Unix system admin for NASA.


57 posted on 07/24/2010 11:20:06 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.....Eagle scout since Sep 9, 1970)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

“Hey, BP! How’s that working for you?”

58 posted on 07/24/2010 11:20:30 AM PDT by RichInOC (No! BAD Rich! (What'd I say?))
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To: NormsRevenge
Where’s muh ‘’Abort, Retry, ‘Epic’ Fail’’ button?

On Zero's computer.

59 posted on 07/24/2010 11:21:23 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.....Eagle scout since Sep 9, 1970)
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To: Repeal 16-17

Watched the testimony, Williams said this Operations Computer was running NT and they were in the process of updating the entire system, but were having program compatibility issues, which were being worked on.

The part of his testimony was when he explained the “double handfull of rubber”. This rubber was from the BOP and he said it was caught in the drilling fluid after an accidental raising the string while to BOP was closed some 15 feet. He was not sure if the computer raised the string or did some operator “bumping the stick”. It would sure seem that once the BOP was stipped of the annual orings, it could not work propererly in an emergency.

One incident shortly before the blowout was when the BP head guy told the rig supervisor to “kick it up” meaning drill faster which resulted in loss of circulation and probably ultimately the blowout.

It also sure seemed that a lot of “Southern Engineering” was going on regarding alarms, BOP and drilling in general.

If you can get a chance to catch a re-run of this on CSpan it was very enlightening.


60 posted on 07/24/2010 11:23:26 AM PDT by dusttoyou (Remember come November)
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To: ConservativeMind

Slight clarification - there are versions of Windows with real-time extensions, such as iNTime and Venturecom RTX, that are used by some industrial applications. No idea what BP was using, but I’m sure it will come out. And despite what Microsoft says, I wouldn’t trust CE or Mobile or embedded XP for anything boom-able or critical. Been there, done that.


61 posted on 07/24/2010 11:23:51 AM PDT by bigbob
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To: tacticalogic

If it’s a high-vibration environment, that can wreck havoc on hard drives and connectors.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

A marine environment is rough on electronics, I’d bet.


62 posted on 07/24/2010 11:23:56 AM PDT by loungitude ( The truth hurts.)
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To: P8riot
Some people just ain't very bright. And never rule out the lazy factor.
63 posted on 07/24/2010 11:25:21 AM PDT by auboy (Men who cannot deceive others are very often successful at deceiving themselves. Samuel Johnson)
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To: UCANSEE2

I recall reading the specs on that rig. Seven 10,000 HP diesel generators.


64 posted on 07/24/2010 11:25:24 AM PDT by loungitude ( The truth hurts.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Found this from link at TOD:

Software Products for Industrial Automation

65 posted on 07/24/2010 11:25:59 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: worst-case scenario
Disabled gas sensor, broken BOP, failing computer systems

Audible alarms disabled.

Unusually high pressure readings.

Unexpected spikes and drops in pressure.

Seismic indications of unstable seafloor. Leaks of oil and gas from seafloor (NOTICED WAY BEFORE THE RIG CAUGHT ON FIRE).

Waivers to skip the waiting period for the cement plugs to cure.

Waivers to jump to replacing heavy mud with seawater ahead of schedule.

The 'crew' was ready to go home. (truth was they wanted off the rig before it 'blew'.)

The "MISSION ACCOMPLISHED" signs were already paid for.

There was a 'party' going on celebrating their success.

The EXPERIENCED CREW wanted to follow safety procedures, the INEXPERIENCED STUFFED SHIRTS were only concerned with the 'official turnover' of the RIG going ahead as planned, damn the torpedoes.

Missing Hangers.

Cheap CHINESE steel pipe casing (with Melamine for more flavor). (another 'waiver' from MMS for BP).

Dead batteries in 'REMOTE BOP ACTIVATORS'.

And that's just off the top of my head.

66 posted on 07/24/2010 11:26:18 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: UCANSEE2

Your list is BRUTAL. Thank you for compiling it I only wish you didn’t have to.

Definitely trial for murder time. I don’t care HOW high this goes.

Take Salazar and Hayward and Suttles and put them on the stand. Americans need to know what’s happening to their people and their land.


67 posted on 07/24/2010 11:32:24 AM PDT by worst-case scenario (Striving to reach the light)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
More from #65:

Productivity3000® PAC Software

***************************************EXCERPT***********************************

... more cost effective than any control solution in the market!

ProductivitySuite Programming Software

The Productivity3000 programmable automation controller (PAC) is a compact controller that combines the features and capabilities of a PC-based control system with that of a typical programmable logic controller (PLC). The Productivity3000 offers you a more powerful control solution that is easier to use and more cost effective than any control solution in the market.

ProductivitySuite is user-friendly programming software designed to allow quick and easy programming of ladder logic programs for the Productivity3000 PAC. The online help file provides information that will help you get acquainted with the software quickly.

Productivity3000 PAC Programming Software

Productivity3000 PAC - Programmable Automation Controller

Visit the in-depth Productivity3000 product Web site

Select online video tutorials to view

Application Instructions
  • Contacts (5) – NO, NC, NOE (NO Edge), NCE (NC Edge), CMP (Compare)
  • Coils (10) – Out, Set, Reset, OR, Flasher, Debounce, Timed, Toggle, Program End, No Operation
  • Application functions (12) – Alarm, Average, Change, Min/Max, Learn Alarm, Limit, Ramp, Ramp Generator, Scale (linear), Scale (nonlinear), Summation, Switch
  • Array functions (4) – Array Statistics, Copy, Fill, Shift/Rotate
  • Counters/Timers (4) – Simple Counter, Counter, Simple Timer, Timer
  • Communications (13) – ASCII in, ASCII Out, Clear Serial Port Buffer, Custom Protocol In, Custom Protocol Out, GS Drive Read, GS Drives Write, Modbus Read, Modbus Write, Send Email, DataWorx Request
  • Data Handling (13) – Absolute Encoder, Compare Values, Copy Data, FIFO/LIFO, First Bit On/Off, Inc/Dec, Logical Bits, Logical Words, Lookup Table, Pack Bits, Shift/Rotate Bits, Sign Magnitude, UnPack Bits
  • Drum sequencers (2) – Drum, Sequencer
  • Math functions (2) – Math Editor (MATH), Data Statistics
  • PID (2) – PID Loop, Ramp/Soak
  • Program control (6) – Call Task, For Loop, For Loop Break, Next Block, Stop Program, User Defined Fault
  • String functions (7) – Compare Strings, Copy Character, Extract String, Find String, Pack String, UnPack String, String Length
  • System functions (2) – LCD Page, Set PAC Time

ProductivitySuite PAC Programming Software

PART NO. DESCRIPTION PRICE INFO
P3-PGMSW Productivity3000 PAC programming and documentation software
Free Download
$495.00 P3-PGMSW Overview
P3-USER-M Productivity3000 User Manual
Free Download
$29.00 Download User Manual


DataWorx P3K PAC Data Logging Software

Part No. Description Price
PC-DATP3K-1 Support for one Productivity3000 PAC system $595.00
PC-DATP3K-UN Support for unlimited Productivity3000 PAC systems $1,595.00
PC-DATP3K-UPG Upgrade from a single license to unlimited $1,000.00
Software Features
  • Built-in database connectivity
  • Tag name based programming
  • Powerful task manager
  • Easy integration with C-more HMI
  • Auto-discover I/O modules
  • Auto-discover variable frequency drives (VFDs)
  • Documentation stored on CPU
  • Comprehensive HELP files
  • Plug and play USB programming
  • Ethernet programming
  • Nimble math instructions
  • Multi-level security options
  • Run-time edits
  • Application specific instructions


PC Requirements
  • Windows® 2000 Service Pack 4, XP Home or Professional, or Vista (32 bit only).

  • Personal Computer with a 333 MHz or higher processor
  • SVGA 800x600 pixels resolution (1024x768 pixels resolution recommended)
  • 150MB free hard-disk space
  • 128MB free RAM (512MB recommended)
  • CD-ROM or DVD drive for installing software from the CD
  • USB or Ethernet port for project transfer to PAC

68 posted on 07/24/2010 11:33:10 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: worst-case scenario

..all the way to the tippy top(..or the dirty ugly bottom


69 posted on 07/24/2010 11:33:41 AM PDT by norraad ("What light!">Blues Brothers)
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To: Lazamataz

They will have a 20 BILLION dollar account set up out of Microsofts coffers just like thay did with BP.

NO rule of law for the deep pockets.


70 posted on 07/24/2010 11:34:12 AM PDT by Delta 21 (If you cant tell if I'm being sarcastic...maybe I'm not.)
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To: central_va

My suspicion from day one, McAfee pushed a DAT file that day that caused thousands if not millions of PC’s to boot-loop the morning the rig caught fire: http://www.bing.com/search?q=mcafee+pc+reboot&form=QBLH&qs=n&sk= McAfee admitted to not testing the DAT on XP SP3. The DAT file detected a Windows system file as a virus and deleted it which caused PC’s to endlessly reboot. It was not a Windows issue.


71 posted on 07/24/2010 11:34:52 AM PDT by theymakemesick (Full of hatred for those that disagree, liberal democrats are the most intolerant bigots on Earth)
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To: HoustonCurmudgeon
"It took a bunch of people not doing the job for this to happen."

It took the Harvard MBAs that the Seven Sisters hire, rather then some poor tool pusher who grew up in the Oil Patch, and went to school at night. This is what you get when you treat a business and a mechanical process as a practical application of economic theory.

72 posted on 07/24/2010 11:37:03 AM PDT by jonascord (We've got the Constitution to protect us. Why should we worry?)
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To: HoustonCurmudgeon
"It took a bunch of people not doing the job for this to happen."

It took the Harvard MBAs that the Seven Sisters hire, rather then some poor tool pusher who grew up in the Oil Patch, and went to school at night. This is what you get when you treat a business and a mechanical process as a practical application of economic theory.

73 posted on 07/24/2010 11:37:03 AM PDT by jonascord (We've got the Constitution to protect us. Why should we worry?)
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To: ConservativeMind

It seems they’ve left out HP’s RTE and RTE-A real-time OS’s. I can think of several sites still running HP-1000’s. Bullet-proof, maybe but I can personally attest to it being oil-proof.


74 posted on 07/24/2010 11:37:55 AM PDT by printhead
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
You will hear old hands carping about the d@mn computers being screwed up again, and it does happen, but usually it is a bad sensor in the system not tracking depth or the sample lagging program getting dumped and a couple of cuttings samples not getting caught as a result. These, while aggravating can be worked around by correcting depth and having someone paying attention to what is going on.

Looking at the wrong data is pretty bad, and the BSOD should never be tolerated in a rig data package.

Still, 'older' hands would likely rely on gauges and pit levels by eyeball rather than believe a computer which tells them something different than their observations, just because they don't trust the computers anyway.

This might have led to the disagreements which were alleged to have occurred between crews and BP management, and I can see where someone might be inclined to blow off readings which indicated adverse conditions in the wellbore as a computer error or miscalibration.

The critical error would be in not verifying that either the computer readouts were in error or that the readings were indeed correct before proceeding, especially when considering the potential for disaster. While the driller's console is an important one, there should be multiple redundencies onsite (or on the rig), not just that one display.

I wonder whose program they were running?

75 posted on 07/24/2010 11:38:15 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Just Press CTRL-ALT-DELETE


76 posted on 07/24/2010 11:43:59 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: ConservativeMind
You don’t want Windows to run your car’s electronics.

Oh.... but some of them do. Chryslers do. Their car electronics runs Windows. I used to pop in a CD to install factory updates.

77 posted on 07/24/2010 11:44:14 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: TheBattman
While I am no MS fan, is Windows the only OS that throws a blue screen when things go wrong?

In the Unix world, it's called a kernel panic, after the name of the privileged function that is called to take the system down:

PANIC(9)		 BSD Kernel Developer's Manual		      PANIC(9)

NAME
     panic -- bring down system on fatal error


SYNOPSIS
     #include <sys/types.h>
     #include <sys/systm.h>

     void
     panic(const char *fmt, ...);

DESCRIPTION
     The panic() function terminates the running system.  The message fmt is a
     printf(3) style format string.  The message is printed to the console and
     the location panicstr is set to the address of the message text for
     retrieval from the OS core dump.

     If the kernel debugger is installed control is passed to it, otherwise an
     attempt to save a core dump of the OS to a configured dump device is
     made.

     If panic() is called twice (from the disk sync routines, for example) the
     system is rebooted without syncing the disks.


RETURN VALUES
     The panic() function does not return.

BSD				August 11, 1995 			   BSD

As far as color, black and white tends to be favored over blue and white.


Linux


Mac OS X

78 posted on 07/24/2010 11:45:10 AM PDT by cynwoody
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

BSOD can mean either a Windows software failure, a hardware failure, or a stealth hardware failure that corrupted the software, causing it to fail.

Sounds like Transocean was using a Windows product, and most likely were using a garden variety commercial Dell PC or the like, a most deadly combination in terms of reliability, robustness, and uptime. I would really hate to see something like that used on, say, a nuclear reactor controller.

Basically, Transocean was using Radio-Shack-Quality components for this particular monitoring function, rather than an industrial computer with a reliable OS like one of the UNIX-derivative OSes.


79 posted on 07/24/2010 11:47:27 AM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Made from the Right Stuff!)
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To: P8riot
Windows: n 32 bit extensions and a graphical shell for a 16 bit patch to an 8 bit operating system originally coded for a 4 bit microprocessor, written by a 2 bit company, that can't stand 1 bit of competition.

Based on an OS stolen from APPLE, who had stolen it from XEROX.

80 posted on 07/24/2010 11:47:51 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: cynwoody

81 posted on 07/24/2010 11:50:44 AM PDT by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: Smokin' Joe
Thanks for the observations....I don't like Windows for a computer for browsing on the Web because of it's affliction to Malware easily getting aboard.
82 posted on 07/24/2010 11:52:04 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: ConservativeMind

On needing a more suitable oprating system and saving billions of dollars ...

True. Plus lives, plus damage to the gulf.


83 posted on 07/24/2010 11:53:30 AM PDT by Cloverfarm (This too shall pass ...)
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To: UCANSEE2
Based on an OS stolen from APPLE, who had stolen it from XEROX.

Apple paid Xerox several million for a couple of hours looking at the interface and Xerox knew why Apple was looking at the interface and understood that Apple was making a graphical user interface. How exactly is that stealing?

84 posted on 07/24/2010 12:00:22 PM PDT by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: ConservativeMind; NormsRevenge; Marine_Uncle
News:

RIM buying QNX to drive Blackberry car integration

******************************EXCERPT*********************************

By Ryan Paul | Last updated 3 months ago

Blackberry maker RIM has made a deal to acquire QNX, the company behind the Neutrino real-time operating system (RTOS). The acquisition, which is expected to complete next month, will give RIM a foothold in car computing and open up opportunities for smart appliance integration.

Neutrino is an exceptionally well-engineered operating system built with a modular microkernal, a sophisticated IPC system, and a lightweight user interface layer. It offers some unusual features, such as support for network-transparent distributed processing. It is principally designed for use in embedded devices, but it can also be installed and run like a conventional desktop operating system

85 posted on 07/24/2010 12:05:00 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Microsoft will be happy to upgrade them to the improved version:
86 posted on 07/24/2010 12:06:21 PM PDT by ctdonath2 (+)
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QNX Neutrino

***************************************EXCERPT***************************************

QNX® products are designed for embedded systems running on ARM, MIPS, PowerPC, SH and x86 platforms, and a host of boards implemented in virtually every type of embedded environment.

87 posted on 07/24/2010 12:08:50 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
I'm not exactly sure how the loop works, but computers on location are often interconnected with a LAN, not just the rig computers, but any accessing the web through them. Ours have anti-virus software on the rig computers, and individual's computers on that web have their own suites, often a variety of software. There are other personally owned computers out there which are not connected full time.

This isn't a government job, so to speak, and while some might have time to surf sites which are more virus intensive than most, most people do not, and doing so is often frowned upon for the risks it can impose on the system. I can't say if some site blocking is used, because I have never tried to surf those sites (I own my computers, and won't subject them to that risk, besides, they are used to prepare final reports at my home, and the grandchildren who live with us occasionally have access--so no porn, ever.) When your living depends to some extent on the survival of your computers and your data, you don't take chances, and you have redundencies onsite.

No one wants to be 'the one' who screwed up the computers, either. A stunt like that would follow you for the rest of your career.

88 posted on 07/24/2010 12:18:36 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

A tragic comedy of errors and getting DC involved will only add to the tragedy.


89 posted on 07/24/2010 12:24:24 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Wandering around now...but I want to see one of these systems:

JBL ships MS-8 digital processor, promises to 'revolutionize' car audio

They have a nice little video audio clip at the link.

90 posted on 07/24/2010 12:34:29 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

So basically we have BP telling DC how NT lead to a BSOD.


91 posted on 07/24/2010 12:36:02 PM PDT by Repeal 16-17 (Let me know when the Shooting starts.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Looks pricey.


92 posted on 07/24/2010 12:36:26 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Interesting link here that could be somewhat related.

IT contractor indicted for sabotaging offshore rig management system

Mario Azar, 28 of Upland, Calif., was charged with illegally accessing and compromising a computer system used by Pacific Energy Resources Ltd. (PER) to monitor offshore platforms in California and Anchorage and to detect oil leaks. The indictment papers allege that Azar's actions affected the "integrity and availability" of the system and resulted in it becoming temporarily unavailable. Though no oil spill or environmental hazard occurred while the system was compromised, Azar's actions caused thousands of dollars in damage, the indictment said.

Suggest all the rig operators seek some expert help.

93 posted on 07/24/2010 12:41:55 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: Richard Kimball

Xerox did try to sue them.


94 posted on 07/24/2010 12:45:58 PM PDT by aft_lizard (Barack Obama is Hugo Chavez's poodle.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
From RISKS-LIST: Risks-Forum Digest Wednesday 22 July 1998 Volume 19 : Issue 88

“USS Yorktown dead in water after divide by zero”

“...in September 1997, the Yorktown suffered a systems failure during maneuvers off the coast of Cape Charles, VA., apparently as a result of the failure to
prevent a divide by zero in a Windows NT application. The zero seems to
have been an erroneous data item that was manually entered. Atlantic Fleet
officials said the ship was dead in the water for about 2 hours and 45
minutes. A previous loss of propulsion occurred on 2 May 1997, also due to
software. Other system collapses are also indicated. [Source: Gregory
Slabodkin, Software glitches leave Navy Smart Ship dead in the water,
Government Computer News, 13 Jul 1998, PGN Stark Abstracting from
http://www.gcn.com/gcn/1998/July13/cov2.htm] “

95 posted on 07/24/2010 12:50:38 PM PDT by ADemocratNoMore (Jeepers, Freepers, where'd 'ya get those sleepers?. Pj people, exposing old media's lies.)
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To: ADemocratNoMore; justa-hairyape

Damn...


96 posted on 07/24/2010 1:01:27 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

DIVIDE BY ZERO ERROR ENCOUNTERED ABORT

97 posted on 07/24/2010 1:10:38 PM PDT by PhilDragoo (Hussein: Islamo-Commie from Kenya)
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To: ConservativeMind; Ernest_at_the_Beach

I doubt the oil drilling ship was actually “run” by a Windows computer. The machinery is operated by industrial computers (Usually called PLC’s, but it can be proprietary computers designed for that specific equipment) that interface directly with real-world I/O. The Windows machines act as a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system and HMI (Human-Machine Interface). All the safety and interlock features in the system are in the PLC or even hard-wired into the machinery controls.

If the people that designed and programmed this rig actually use Windows computers to directly operate machinery, then they are fools. But no one does that. It is unheard of in any industry, especially a dangerous one.

This whole “BSOD caused the explosion” story is a red herring.


98 posted on 07/24/2010 1:15:58 PM PDT by Bryanw92 (Obama is like a rocket scientist....who's trying to do brain surgery with a hammer.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
99 posted on 07/24/2010 1:19:57 PM PDT by MarineBrat (Better dead than red!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Nobody in a serious industry uses crap like Productivity 3000 PAC. That’s a product you sell to a small factory in light industry to automate something simple, and then its still usually an Epic Fail! Heavy industry relies on the big name equipment: Allen-Bradley, Siemens, Modicon, GE.


100 posted on 07/24/2010 1:24:29 PM PDT by Bryanw92 (Obama is like a rocket scientist....who's trying to do brain surgery with a hammer.)
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