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Killer's sentence well deserved
Waterbury Republican-Republican ^ | December 4, 2010 | Editorial

Posted on 12/04/2010 3:51:58 PM PST by Graybeard58

"I have seriously considered suicide many times. I have no wife, no children, no home and no interest in life in general." "I used to have trust and faith in humanity and you have taken that from me."

"You destroyed our family."

"He does not deserve life."

Those are just a few of the statements made by members of the Petit and Hawke families when Steven Hayes, who was convicted of murdering Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her daughters Hayley and Michaela during a savage July 2007 home invasion in Cheshire, was formally sentenced to death Thursday by New Haven Superior Court Judge Jon Blue.

Hayes has a criminal record dating to 1980, when he was in his teens. Among his crimes were forgery, disorderly conduct, burglary and larceny.

During Hayes' trial, prosecutors presented a three-year old letter the defendant's younger brother, Matthew Hayes, wrote to the state police. He painted a picture of Steven Hayes as someone who exhibited sociopathic tendencies at a young age.

Matthew Hayes described having had his hand placed on a hot stove burner by his brother while they were in their teens. He also described having a gun placed to his head by his brother, and how Steven Hayes stole from and struck their mother.

During the penalty phase of the trial, a retired prison official, Frederick Levesque, testified that while in prison, Hayes threatened to kill corrections officers on two separate occasions: once in 1986, when Hayes was upset about needing permission to make a phone call; and the other last March. According to a published report, Hayes has received 23 disciplinary citations in the 30 years he has spent in the Connecticut correctional system. The most serious of these citations followed a June 1992 incident in which a homemade blowgun and dart were found in his cell.

Then there is the invasion of the Petit family home. Hayes was found guilty of six capital felonies stemming from the massacre. They included killing two or more people, the killing of a person under 16, murder in the course of a sexual assault, and three counts of intentionally causing death during a kidnapping.

During sentencing Thursday, Hayes apologized for and accepted responsibility for his actions. This apology, while extensive, will do nothing to erase the pain his actions have caused these families.

Even the most cursory analysis of Hayes' background reveals a man with a long history of anti-social behavior who has perpetrated or threatened to perpetrate unspeakable acts of violence. Connecticut courts correctly reserve death row for the worst of the worst, and Hayes has more than earned his place in line for execution.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Editorial; US: Connecticut
KEYWORDS: petit
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Disclaimer:

The poster of this article is against the death penalty.

I won't engage anyone on the point, I've debated myself about it all my adult life to arrive at my conclusion.

Feel free to hurl personal insults at me, I can assure you, I have endured them already on this forum for my stance.

There are a few people here who stand with me and they are bold enough to say so when they see articles like this but we are a distinct minority here and I realize that but do not apologize for it.

1 posted on 12/04/2010 3:52:00 PM PST by Graybeard58
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To: 4Liberty; ColdOne; JPG; Pining_4_TX; jamndad5; Biggirl; rejoicing; rightly_dividing; iopscusa; ...

Ping to a Republican-American Editorial.

If you want on or off this ping list, let me know.


2 posted on 12/04/2010 3:53:12 PM PST by Graybeard58
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To: Graybeard58

I used to have trust and faith in humanity”


Good night! If all the faith I had was in humanity, I would want to commit suicide too!! humanity is fallen.... I can look at myself and figure that out!!


3 posted on 12/04/2010 3:53:41 PM PST by bareford101 (For me, there is no difference in a tolerant, open mind and a cess pool. Both are open to filth.)
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To: Graybeard58

Fry the maggot.


4 posted on 12/04/2010 3:58:07 PM PST by SVTCobra03 (You can never have enough friends, horsepower or ammunition.)
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To: Graybeard58

This POS deserves a quick execution and not decades of appeals. Sadly his conviction will be subject to endless appeals at our expense.


5 posted on 12/04/2010 3:58:18 PM PST by The Great RJ (The Bill of Rights: Another bill members of Congress haven't read.)
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To: Graybeard58

I’m somewhat ambivalent about its application and entrusting such to the idiots who are attracted to government, but I believe wholeheartedly that God allows it and that there are many who deserve it.


6 posted on 12/04/2010 3:58:31 PM PST by Trailerpark Badass (I'd rather take my chances with someone misusing freedom than someone misusing power.)
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To: Graybeard58
I won't assail you for your beliefs, and if that's where your conscience has led you, then I appreciate the courage of your convictions. Certainly, pro or con, this is not an issue to be taken lightly.

Nevertheless, IMHO, cases such as this not only merit, but demand the ultimate penalty. Anything less devalues the life of the victims in the eyes of the law.

7 posted on 12/04/2010 4:05:29 PM PST by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: Graybeard58
Feel free to hurl personal insults at me, I can assure you, I have endured them already on this forum for my stance.

I won't hurl insults at you but I will say that collectively, American society has deemed the death penalty an appropriate punishment for certain crimes. This being said, if the perpetrators of the Petit home invasion/murders don't receive this penalty, there is really no reason to have it on the books. This is truly one of the most heinous crimes in modern American history and I'd be hard-pressed to think of two individuals whose crimes have warranted execution more than Hayes and Komisarjevsky.

8 posted on 12/04/2010 4:06:04 PM PST by Drew68
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To: Graybeard58

I disagree with you strongly - my philosophy regarding the death penalty can best be summed up by the phrase “early and often” - but I see no reason for anyone to insult you for your position.


9 posted on 12/04/2010 4:08:40 PM PST by xjcsa (Ridiculing the ridiculous since the day I was born.)
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To: Graybeard58

Prayers up for Mr. Petit.
This poor man. God help him.


10 posted on 12/04/2010 4:09:57 PM PST by patriot08 (TEXAS GAL- born and bred and proud of it!)
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To: Graybeard58

No need to apologize for your opinion. You’re honest about it and that is ok. One thing about the death penalty though, the sob will never threaten anyone again in any way shape or form.I sleep better knowing that


11 posted on 12/04/2010 4:14:58 PM PST by Figment ("A communist is someone who reads Marx.An anti-communist is someone who understands Marx" R Reagan)
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To: Graybeard58

There has to be respect for people who have a conscientious objection to the death penalty. One can feel that these men deserve to die but that it’s not our place to kill them.


12 posted on 12/04/2010 4:18:53 PM PST by Borges
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To: Graybeard58

I would shoot this dog in a second.

That said, I would be glad to bargain away the right to kill those who desperately deserve to be killed, for the lives of the innocent unborn killed every day.

Providing, of course, that we retain the right to turn the rest of this animal’s life into a hell on earth.


13 posted on 12/04/2010 4:23:52 PM PST by LouD ("against all enemies, foreign and domestic...")
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Steven Hayes will never murder again. The death penalty actually
works.


14 posted on 12/04/2010 4:26:59 PM PST by pyx (Rule#1.The LEFT lies.Rule#2.See Rule#1. IF THE LEFT CONTROLS THE LANGUAGE, IT CONTROLS THE ARGUMENT.)
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To: patriot08
This poor man. God help him.

I don't know how he does it.

Me? I would make it my life's ambition to break Hayes and Komisarjevsky out of prison so that I could kill them myself.

15 posted on 12/04/2010 4:28:13 PM PST by Drew68
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To: Graybeard58

Personally, I prefer that the perp receive long-term torture - something that keeps him alive but in excruciating physical and mental pain for decades. Sadly, that would probably be deemed unconstitutional.


16 posted on 12/04/2010 4:30:12 PM PST by neutrino (Globalization is the economic treason that dare not speak its name.(173))
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To: Drew68

In certain extreme situations, the law is inadequate. In order to shame its inadequacy, it is necessary to act outside the law. To pursue... natural justice. This is not vengeance. Revenge is not a valid motive, it’s an emotional response. No, not vengeance. Punishment.


17 posted on 12/04/2010 4:34:18 PM PST by itsLUCKY2B (?Borders, Language, and Culture.?)
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To: Graybeard58

The death penalty aside, cases like this one make a perfect argument for a national three-strikes-and-you’re-out law.

By that I mean if a person commits three felonies (ANY three felonies), that person should be deemed unfit to be a member of society and put away forever.

Give him no chance to commit that fourth felony, not alone a tenth one, like we see so often today.

The prisoner’s new “home” does not necessarily have to be a cramped cell.

Perhaps give him a small cottage on a farm. There he can work a small plot of land as he sees fit, for the rest of his life.

Of course, the farm must be surrounded by razor wire and the adjoining land mined.


18 posted on 12/04/2010 4:36:11 PM PST by Leaning Right
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To: Graybeard58

I volunteer to carry out this sentence for no recompense at all. My only requirement is that I be permitted to use a flamethrower to carry it out.


19 posted on 12/04/2010 4:38:05 PM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: pyx
"I am deeply sorry for what I have done and the pain I have caused," Hayes said. "My actions have hurt so many people, affected so many lives, caused so much pain. I am tormented and have nightmares about what happened in that house. Death will be a welcome relief." -- Convicted murder, Steven Hayes

America is a compassionate and just society. America and more especially Connecticut, should give Steven Hayes the welcomed relief for which he asks ... as soon as possible.


20 posted on 12/04/2010 4:45:19 PM PST by pyx (Rule#1.The LEFT lies.Rule#2.See Rule#1. IF THE LEFT CONTROLS THE LANGUAGE, IT CONTROLS THE ARGUMENT.)
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To: SVTCobra03

If this had happened to my family, I would have done everything possible, that I could think of, to smuggle in a gun, and blow the a-holes brains out! Damn the consequences!
Sorry.


21 posted on 12/04/2010 4:46:39 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Graybeard58

I don’t think any one reasonable would insult you for your views - anyone who believes in intelligent discourse and discussion would at least respect the person while disagreeing with the position.

I am of the like mind with those that say that if there is a crime that fits the death penalty, this is it. No ifs, ands or buts.

The tragedy will continue for Dr. Petit and his family as the appeals process begins, and Hayes will live warm, comfortable albeit confined existence for years, if not his natural life, while the state of Connecticut refuses to carry out the sentence that was given to him properly by a judge and jury. That he breaths another breath after what he did to that family is an insult to that family, their friends, and to civil society.

Hayes and his partner in crime deserve to die for their actions, and the sooner, the better.


22 posted on 12/04/2010 4:47:36 PM PST by IMTOFT (At least I'm enjoying the ride...)
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To: Graybeard58

Perhaps you can stand before Dr. Petit and tell him your tale of respect for the life of the murdering pig who beat him, raped his young daughter and wife and set them on fire while tied to their beds.

I am sure he is interested in your ‘feelings’ about the death penalty.


23 posted on 12/04/2010 4:49:49 PM PST by Carley (ISRAEL.......NOT SO ALONE!!!)
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To: Graybeard58
Here's an idea you may not have heard or thought of before:

If a person is charged with murder (with intent or during a crime) and found guilty, then the sentencing goes to the family or bereaved closest to the victim. Appeals are considered only on the basis of new evidence. Thumbs up and the perp does absolute life in prison. This includes no gym time, phone calls, rec room, TV, education or any of the other crap now going on in prison. The perp works 10 hour days six days a week and any monies beyond support costs go to the family. Three hots and a cot. Medical care for minor medical and pain relief. Terminal illness is given it's course. Sentence is carried out within one year.

If thumbs down, the closest family member/legal representative pulls the lever, pushes the plunger or throws the switch.

In this way, multiple benefits are achieved:

1. The perp is punished.
2. The victim is avenged.
3. The family has a measure of revenge.
4. The law is upheld and will increase respect for the law.
4. Society is protected.
5. No costs are incurred to the state.
6. The state does NOT have the power of life and death over the individual.
7. Mercy or death is the option of the justly aggrieved and part of the historic purpose of punishment and justice in the emotional and spiritual realm.
8. Fear is instilled in evil doers.
9. There is no recourse for the convicted, thus, no protracted legal costs or wrangling.
10. The general populace has renewed confidence in governance and security in society.

24 posted on 12/04/2010 4:57:24 PM PST by WorkingClassFilth
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To: xjcsa

‘Early and often’ indeed. I support the Texas Fast-Track.

The poor victim, though — what a terrible thing. May the Lord touch him and hold on tightly.


25 posted on 12/04/2010 5:15:01 PM PST by bboop (Stealth Tutor)
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To: WorkingClassFilth
Makes sense to me. Unfortunately, most rules, laws
regulations by politicians NEVER make any sense to
me. I get the feeling that this group is going out
of their way to make sure what they do doesn't
make sense to me.
26 posted on 12/04/2010 5:33:18 PM PST by cliff630
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To: Graybeard58
As a general rule I cannot support a death penalty in America at this point in time; too many ways it resembles giving the Ronnie Earles, Janet Renos, Scott Harshbargers, Martha Coakleys, and Mike Nifongs of the world a license to kill people.

In theory at least I've got nothing against hanging somebody like Manson, Dennis Rader, Paul Bernardo, John Mohammed...

Here's the problem: I'd want several changes to the system before I could feel good about capital punishment anymore.

1. Guilt should be beyond any doubt whatsoever; the usual criteria of guilt "beyond a reasonable doubt" doesn't cut it for hanging somebody.

2. The person in question must represent a continuing threat to society should he ever escape or otherwise get loose. The "bird man" of Alcatraz would not qualify, John Mohammed clearly would.

3. I'd want all career/money incentives for convicting people of crimes gone which would mean scrapping the present "adversarial" system of justice in favor of something like the French "inquisitorial" system in which the common objective of all parties involved was a determination of facts.

4. I'd want there to be no societal benefit to keeping the person alive. Cases in which this criteria would prevent hanging somebody would include "Son of Sam" who we probably should want to study more than hang, or Timothy McVeigh who clearly knew more than the public ever was allowed to hear.

Given all of that I could feel very good about hanging Charles Manson, John Muhammed, or Paul Bernardo, but that's about what it would take.

In fact in a totally rational world the job of District Attorney as it is known in America would not exist. NOBODY should ever have any sort of a career or money incentive for sending people to prison, much less for executing people. The job of District Attorney in America seems to involve almost limitless power and very little resembling accountability and granted there is no shortage of good people who hold the job, the combination has to attract the wrong kinds of people as well.

They expected DNA testing to eliminate the prime suspect in felony cases in something like one or two percent of cases and many people were in states of shock when that number came back more like 33 or 35%. That translates into some fabulous number of people sitting around in prisons for stuff they don't know anything at all about since the prime suspect in a felony case usually goes to prison. Moreover, in a state like Texas which executes a hundred people a year or thereabouts, that has to translate into innocent people being executed here and there.


The guy being described here however meets all the criteria; I'd have no realproblems with the idea of hanging him.

27 posted on 12/04/2010 5:51:22 PM PST by wendy1946
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To: wendy1946

Check this out: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2637529/posts?page=24#24

Hope this meets your approval and fills the requirements you hold . . .


28 posted on 12/04/2010 5:57:15 PM PST by WorkingClassFilth
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To: The Great RJ
This POS deserves a quick execution

He deserves a slow execution. Very slow.

29 posted on 12/04/2010 6:14:24 PM PST by Age of Reason
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To: Graybeard58

I am not a big fan of the death penalty, either, however, in some cases, it is warranted,IMHO. This is probably one of them. In situatons where the person is convicted on mostly circumstantial evidence, or maintains his innocence when there is any chance that someone else COULD have committed the crime, I am not so much in favor of it. For the simple reason that the person is being asked to trust his life to a lawyer that probably can’t be trusted with 25 cents. I do believe that my own state, Texas, is a bit too generous with the death penalty at times, as well as other states don’t pass it out often enough. I believe Manson should have gotten the death penalty.JMO...


30 posted on 12/04/2010 6:14:48 PM PST by Quickgun (As a former fetus, I'm opposed to abortion. Mamas don't let your cowboys grow up to be babies..)
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To: itsLUCKY2B
This is not vengeance. Revenge is not a valid motive

Revenge is good.

31 posted on 12/04/2010 6:16:33 PM PST by Age of Reason
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To: Graybeard58

I save my vitriol for those who are violently pro-abortion, but think the death penalty is horrible.


32 posted on 12/04/2010 6:27:04 PM PST by Politicalmom (America-The Land of the Sheep, the Home of the Caved.)
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To: The Great RJ

For many of us, it is not about an eye for an eye, but whether a life has become so irredeemable as warrant termination. In this instance, with the heinous nature of this crime, and the circumstance of his capture by the police, execution is indeed the only just punishment.

To me I believe that this individual has surrendered his right to continue living. He has spent 30 years in prisons for various crimes. This was the natural, inevitable, conclusion.

His execution should be equivalent to the pain and torment he inflicted on those young girls.


33 posted on 12/04/2010 6:30:56 PM PST by Ouderkirk (Democrats...the party of Slavery, Segregation, Sodomy, and Sedition)
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To: Graybeard58
I'm not clear whether you are for or against the DP....but it doesn't matter....we all can have our own beliefs...

I struggle to be against the DP but cases like this...geesh....it makes you cringe the painful deaths these lovely young women suffered...the darkest hour of the darkest day and no one could help them...

these animals....the DP is almost too good for them...the DP is one quick moment and then nothing.....compared to the endless hrs this mother and her dtrs went thru....

I'd be glad to get rid of the DP if life in prisonment meant life in prison...but also included banishment....no media to talk to ...no pen pal letters...no internet....

34 posted on 12/04/2010 6:31:40 PM PST by cherry
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To: Graybeard58

Thanks for the ping Graybeard.


35 posted on 12/04/2010 6:33:00 PM PST by rockinqsranch (Dems, Libs, Socialists, call 'em what you will, they ALL have fairies livin' in their trees.)
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To: Slyfox; All

Sometimes, people do relinquish their right to life when committing heinous acts as this man did. And, society has a right to defend itself against people who have no regard for life. I lost a cousin to such a murderer. His parents still have not gotten over it.


36 posted on 12/04/2010 6:34:06 PM PST by Slyfox
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To: wendy1946
Moreover, in a state like Texas which executes a hundred people a year or thereabouts, that has to translate into innocent people being executed here and there.

"Innocent" is an interesting word.

1) Despite all the hoopla, AFAIK nobody has definitively proved anyone has been executed in America for a crime he didn't commit.

2) A very large percentage of those released as "innocent" due to new evidence, usually DNA, are not innocent in any meaningful sense, they are merely innocent of the particular crime of which they were convicted. Many if not most of them are career criminals who have committed dozens or hundreds of crimes for which they were never charged, much less convicted. If one of these career criminals is occasionally convicted of a crime he didn't actually commit, I have some difficulty seeing this as anything other than a case of poetic justice, or perhaps of God having a sense of humor.

Which is not to say we shouldn't improve our criminal justice system wherever we can. I really am not in favor of punishing people for crimes they didn't commit, even if they are indeed "bad people."

But I don't think there are large numbers of "innocent people," in the sense of non-criminal types, in prison for capital murders they didn't commit.

37 posted on 12/04/2010 6:34:48 PM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: Lurker
My only requirement is that I be permitted to use a flamethrower to carry it out

I like your thinking.

38 posted on 12/04/2010 6:51:13 PM PST by Ouderkirk (Democrats...the party of Slavery, Segregation, Sodomy, and Sedition)
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To: Graybeard58

I favor the death penalty, not only for this vermin but for the judge who let him out to do this heinous deed.


39 posted on 12/04/2010 6:52:08 PM PST by OrangeHoof (Washington, we Texans want a divorce!)
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To: Quickgun

“I believe Manson should have gotten the death penalty.”

He did get the death penalty but it was commuted to life:

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_Charles_Manson_on_death_row

“No, Charles Manson is not on death row. His death sentence was changed to life imprisonment after the Supreme Court of the State of California acted to abolish the death penalty. His next scheduled parole hearing is in 2012.”


40 posted on 12/04/2010 7:01:18 PM PST by Graybeard58
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To: Carley
I am sure he is interested in your ‘feelings’ about the death penalty.

You put the word feelings in quotes, you certainly are not quoting me as I mentioned "feelings" nowhere in my reply.

41 posted on 12/04/2010 7:09:00 PM PST by Graybeard58
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To: Graybeard58

The benefit of the capital punishment is to at least relieve the victim’s family of a horrific psychological burden. Perhaps for others, the death penalty would compound the stress and despair. Whatever works best for the survivors makes sense.

In cases such as these, society owes the option of capital punishment to the victim’s family with a 3 year waiting before a decision could be made, another 2 years before the option is rescinded. If the choice is made for execution, it takes place within two weeks. In default after 5 years, the outcome is determined by the State.


42 posted on 12/04/2010 7:18:24 PM PST by Gene Eric (Your Hope has been redistributed. Here's your Change.)
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To: Gene Eric
Perhaps for others, the death penalty would compound the stress and despair. Whatever works best for the survivors makes sense.

I've read of cases, not just tv dramas, where survivors or next of kin ask that the death penalty not be sought.

I believe their wishes are usually respected.

43 posted on 12/04/2010 7:22:45 PM PST by Graybeard58
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To: Lurker

>> My only requirement is that I be permitted to use a flamethrower to carry it out.

Fine by me, but don’t get too close... you want to cook him niiiice and slooooow.


44 posted on 12/04/2010 7:24:25 PM PST by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
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To: Graybeard58

>> The poster of this article is against the death penalty.

What punishment would you recommend, then?


45 posted on 12/04/2010 7:25:03 PM PST by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
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To: WorkingClassFilth

Not bad. Well thought out.


46 posted on 12/04/2010 7:29:21 PM PST by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
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To: Ouderkirk

“To me I believe that this individual has surrendered his right to continue living.”

Absolutely. It pains me to hear the arguments about treating prisoners compassionately, and that their rights are seen to completely...I’m certainly not advocating torture or inhumane living conditions, but at some point, when a person chooses to deprive an innocent person of their most BASIC right - the right to live - then they surrender a significant amount of their basic rights...in this case, they’ve willing given up the right to live...

I don’t believe in a long, torturous death for Hayes, he doesn’t deserve the effort...it should be quick, soon and immediate...the Russians had an excellent system, the prisoner was taken from the cell with no warning, no public announcement, the execution was a quick shot to the back of the head, and the family was billed for the bullet...


47 posted on 12/04/2010 7:41:02 PM PST by IMTOFT (At least I'm enjoying the ride...)
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To: Nervous Tick; All

Thanks! Please circulate it so it might go somewhere . . .

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/2637529/posts?page=24#24


48 posted on 12/04/2010 7:42:59 PM PST by WorkingClassFilth
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To: WorkingClassFilth

“The perp works 10 hour days six days a week...”

That’s the only part I disagree with as far as your proposal...My father was a Federal judge and I raised that suggestion once during a discussion and he said that case law was pretty clear that we cannot compel a prisoner to work.

That being said, if the murderer wishes to spend his day rotting in his cell, I’m OK with that.


49 posted on 12/04/2010 7:49:56 PM PST by IMTOFT (At least I'm enjoying the ride...)
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To: Sherman Logan
2) A very large percentage of those released as "innocent" due to new evidence, usually DNA, are not innocent in any meaningful sense, they are merely innocent of the particular crime of which they were convicted. Many if not most of them are career criminals who have committed dozens or hundreds of crimes for which they were never charged, much less convicted. If one of these career criminals is occasionally convicted of a crime he didn't actually commit, I have some difficulty seeing this as anything other than a case of poetic justice, or perhaps of God having a sense of humor.

The problem with this is that when a total scumbag is convicted for a crime they didn't commit, it means that there is another scumbag who got away with it.

Interesting bit of trivia on this point: As Governor of Texas, George W. Bush commuted the sentence of exactly one condemned man to a sentence of life in prison. The man? Notorious serial killer Henry Lee Lucas. Despite being linked to dozens, if not hundreds of murders, Lucas was convicted of a mere eleven killings and sentenced to death for only one, a yet-unidentified Jane Doe known in case files only as "Orange Socks" (the sole items of clothing her body was found wearing). In a strange twist of irony, later investigations determined that this single victim, Orange Socks, was most likely killed by someone other than Lucas. Faced with these findings, Bush really had no choice but to commute the sentence.

Lucas would die in prison of heart failure a couple of years after his commutation while the true killer of Orange Socks has yet to face justice. The important point is that had Bush not exonerated Lucas for this single murder, the case files on Orange Socks would've been closed. Crime solved. Lucas did it. At least today her file remains open and while the chances of her killer being apprehended are slim, there's still a chance that justice may eventually be served.

50 posted on 12/04/2010 8:01:49 PM PST by Drew68
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