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George F. Will: Rev the scientific engine
Washington Post ^ | January 2, 2011 | George F. Will

Posted on 01/02/2011 12:11:23 PM PST by neverdem

New Republican legislators should come down Capitol Hill to the National Museum of American History, which displays a device that in 1849 was granted U.S. patent 6469. It enabled a boat's "draught of water to be readily lessened" so it could "pass over bars, or through shallow water."

The patentee was from Sangamon County, Ill. Across Constitution Avenue, over the Commerce Department's north entrance, are some words of the patentee, Abraham Lincoln:

THE PATENT SYSTEM ADDED

THE FUEL OF INTEREST

TO THE FIRE OF GENIUS

Stoking that fire is, more than ever, a proper federal function, so the legislators should be given some reading matter. One is William Rosen's book "The Most Powerful Idea in the World," a study of the culture of invention. Another is the National Academy of Sciences report "Rising Above the Gathering Storm, Revisited," an addendum to a 2005 report on declining support for science and engineering research.

Such research is what canals and roads once were - a prerequisite for long-term economic vitality. The first Republican president revered Henry Clay, whose "American System" stressed spending on such "internal improvements." Today, the prerequisites for economic dynamism are ideas. Deborah Wince-Smith of the...

--snip--

U.S. undergraduate institutions award 16 percent of their degrees in the natural sciences or engineering; South Korea and China award 38 percent and 47 percent, respectively. America ranks 27th among developed nations in the proportion of students receiving undergraduate degrees in science or engineering...

--snip--

An iconic conservative understood this. Margaret Thatcher, who studied chemistry as an Oxford undergraduate, said:

"Although basic science can have colossal economic rewards, they are totally unpredictable. And therefore the rewards cannot be judged by immediate results. Nevertheless, the value of [Michael] Faraday's work today must be higher than the capitalization of all shares on the stock exchange."...

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtonpost.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Editorial; Government; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: abrahamlincoln; science; stem
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1 posted on 01/02/2011 12:11:29 PM PST by neverdem
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To: neverdem

Yup. I’ve seen the model of Abe Lincoln’s invention, dunno if it went anywhere.


2 posted on 01/02/2011 12:16:13 PM PST by sinanju
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To: neverdem
George Will is correct here but nothing that he says is new. Those on Wall Street should be made aware of this as well. They are even more important than those in Washington and the State Capitals. Those in Corporate Board Rooms need to focus in on this as well. Those corporations need to be made aware that in the long run success is determined by coming up with better products and not by financial manipulation. These Boards of Directors need more scientists and engineers and less MBAs and Attorneys.
3 posted on 01/02/2011 12:17:57 PM PST by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: neverdem

“..Lincoln started work on his invention between sessions of Congress in 1848. On his way home to Illinois his boat became stranded on a sandbar. As Herndon told the story, “The captain ordered the hands to collect all the loose planks, empty barrels and boxes and force them under the sides of the boat. These empty casks were used to buoy it up. After forcing enough of them under the vessel she lifted gradually and at last swung clear of the opposing sand bar.”

Herndon observed, “Lincoln had watched this operation very intently. It no doubt carried him back to the days of his navigation on the turbulent Sangamon, when he and John Hanks had rendered similar service at New Salem dam to their employer the volatile Offut. Continual thinking on the subject of lifting vessels over sand bars and other obstructions in the water suggested to him the idea of inventing an apparatus for this purpose.”

Lincoln created a scale model of his invention with the help of Walter Davis, a Springfield mechanic, who provided tools and advice. Herndon recalled, “Occasionally he would bring the model in the office, and while whittling on it would descant on its merits and the revolution it was destined to work in steamboat navigation. Although I regarded the thing as impracticable I said nothing, probably out of respect for Lincoln’s well-known reputation as a boatman.”

With some relief Herndon said, “the invention was never applied to any vessel, so far as I ever learned, and the threatened revolution in steamboat architecture and navigation never came to pass.”

http://showcase.netins.net/web/creative/lincoln/education/patent.htm


4 posted on 01/02/2011 12:19:02 PM PST by sinanju
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To: neverdem

The crap that schools pass off as “science” won’t get us anywhere.


5 posted on 01/02/2011 12:21:38 PM PST by G Larry (When you're right, avoid compromise!)
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To: neverdem; truthguy

I actually temped at the front desk of the Patent Office library at the new HQ in Alexandria several years ago.

Quite an inspiring foyer, unfortunately there’s more money made in the much-advertised-on-TV industry designed to fleece the would-be inventor. I have a friend who is a patent researcher, he tells me the system is stacked against the little guy with the Big Idea. You actually have a revolutionary invention, chances are it will be stolen from you and you’ll die in poverty with those many others.


6 posted on 01/02/2011 12:23:57 PM PST by sinanju
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To: neverdem
I'm a "scientist," I guess. I've got a few patents, anyway.

Patents won't sell their vote in return for an EBT card. For that reason, the politicians in DC don't give a fat excrement about them. End of story, Mr. Will.

7 posted on 01/02/2011 12:25:24 PM PST by Steely Tom (Obama goes on long after the thrill of Obama is gone)
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To: neverdem
Interesting read, but I can NOT subscribe to Mr. Will's fascination with federal funding of R&D. The government's role in promoting innovation is to protect the inventions, make it easier for the inventor to get his patent and protect his idea for commercialization, then to be allowed to actually keep the majority of profit from his idea.

THAT would be a proper function of the federal government.

8 posted on 01/02/2011 12:26:53 PM PST by Lloyd227 (Class of 1998 (let's all help the Team McCain spider monkeys decide how to moderate))
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To: neverdem

Will flips between Hamilton and Jefferson and here’s he in full Hamilton mode:

” But the public should not now be punished by penalizing, with diminished funding, the scientific disciplines that have been mostly innocent of the behaviors that have sometimes made academia a subject of satire.”

He tells how the ‘humanities’ have been corrupted but puts ‘faith’ in the sciences - typical nerd posturing as an ‘intellectual’ - when in fact, it is the junk science that the universities have used to help corrupt the ‘humanities’ and political science.

Fed funding of education should cease as unconstitutional and let the best succeed on their own feet. Junk science is driven by gov’t grants.


9 posted on 01/02/2011 12:27:03 PM PST by Kent C
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To: neverdem
Richard Levin, economist and Yale's president, asks: Would Japan's growth have lagged since 1990 "if Microsoft, Netscape, Apple and Google had been Japanese companies"? Japan's failure has been a failure to innovate.

How does this fit into Will's thesis that research universities need more money? Microsoft and Apple were founded by college dropouts.

10 posted on 01/02/2011 12:27:58 PM PST by LibFreeOrDie (Obama promised a gold mine, but will give us the shaft.)
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To: LibFreeOrDie

“How does this fit into Will’s thesis that research universities need more money? Microsoft and Apple were founded by college dropouts.”

Such an excellent point - you’d think that he would have thought of that.


11 posted on 01/02/2011 12:30:55 PM PST by Kent C
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To: neverdem

Will and others like him still cling to the belief that big government can do good things, that it just needs to be better directed.

That idea that we need to redistribute wealth into research is just as destructive the idea that it should be redistributed to a class of people.

It’s not what the redistributed wealth is used for, it’s the forced redistribution that’s important.

Will will never get it.


12 posted on 01/02/2011 12:32:36 PM PST by DManA
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To: neverdem

Science has been corrupted by politics. Will should stick to baseball.

Pray for the Tea Party Congress


13 posted on 01/02/2011 12:33:58 PM PST by bray (Voting for Palin will explode heads on both sides.)
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To: neverdem

Try it without millions of men in new manufacturing starts, and the “scientific engine” won’t “rev” very high. We’re in a depression caused by the vanity of rebellion against Creation (political correctness), and men of ingenuity are preparing for the consequences. They’ll work again, when that work is properly appreciated and compensed.


14 posted on 01/02/2011 12:38:48 PM PST by familyop (cbt. engr. (cbt), NG, '89-' 96, Duncan Hunter or no-vote.)
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To: sinanju

True, just like the guy that sold bill gates the first operating system. His check was 65000, bills was for 65billion.


15 posted on 01/02/2011 12:45:35 PM PST by org.whodat
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To: Steely Tom
"I'm a "scientist," I guess. I've got a few patents, anyway."

"Patents won't sell their vote in return for an EBT card. For that reason, the politicians in DC don't give a fat excrement about them. End of story, Mr. Will."

Well said. I don't have any patents but do enjoy modifying and building free, off-grid energy system designs (kept free by inventors with calls for improvements) for me and mine. ...might work for others, after the regime of thievery and idiotic regulations is done.


16 posted on 01/02/2011 12:52:18 PM PST by familyop (cbt. engr. (cbt), NG, '89-' 96, Duncan Hunter or no-vote.)
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To: neverdem

I’m gonna be blunt:

I took some advanced computer classes at a large university. They were so happy to see a white American they could barely contain themselves. The fact that most of the faculty were none white immigrants didn’t stop them from their excitement. I was a novelty conversation piece. The rest of the student body was composed of arrogant Chinese, cheating Indians, and scary, smoking Russians. It was a very depressing atmosphere. There was an easy undergraduate track called “Management, Information Systems” for our domestic minorities and women. It was non-technical (one introductory programming course), but corporations are so desperate for minorities and women “in science”, they hire them for more money than the technical “Computer Science” graduates.

The world is up-side-down.

The cure would be to balance the tax and mandate burden of foreign and domestic production. Our over burdened domestic producers cannot compete with unfettered foreign producers.

Naturally, reducing domestic taxes would be the proper solution, rather than adding tariffs to imports.


17 posted on 01/02/2011 12:55:33 PM PST by Born to Conserve
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To: G Larry
The crap that schools pass off as “science” won’t get us anywhere.

Yes you are correct. I have a friend who has just retired after over 25 years as a business professor at a local university. His opinion is that the liberal arts and humanities have corrupted science and even technology at the university level. Science and Engineering were supposed to be "immune" from the frailties of the humanities. That's been demolished in the last few decades as we have seen the explosion of "junk science" at the university level. The "theory" of man made global warming is proof positive of this.
18 posted on 01/02/2011 12:55:54 PM PST by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: truthguy
Those corporations need to be made aware that in the long run success is determined by coming up with better products and not by financial manipulation.

As a rule, "better products" are the realm of the small business and the entrepreneur. Large "Wall Street corporations" have never been leaders in innovation -- nor will they ever likely be. The culture just won't allow it.

The exception that proves the rule are scientifically oriented companies with a vested interest in research (e.g., pharmaceuticals).

19 posted on 01/02/2011 12:56:01 PM PST by okie01 (THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA: Ignorance on Parade)
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To: neverdem
"U.S. undergraduate institutions award 16 percent of their degrees in the natural sciences or engineering; South Korea and China award 38 percent and 47 percent, respectively. America ranks 27th among developed nations in the proportion of students receiving undergraduate degrees in science or engineering..."

Change the H1B fiasco. There is no need for greater than 60% of all engineers employed in high tech companies to be foreign nationals when there are literally tens of thousands of US engineers un and under employed.

This will require a tariff to level the playing field in place of corporate income taxes, but it can be done. Lord knows US companies face significant barriers when attempting to penetrate the protected markets of the countries we are exporting our manufacturing to.

20 posted on 01/02/2011 1:03:11 PM PST by Natural Law (Stay thirsty my friends)
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To: neverdem

Silly article. Economic nincompoops like George Will often have absolutely nothing to say, but their bread-and-butter requires them to fill up a page in a magazine, so they bluster about something.

How about this:

Quality, not quantity. Despite our “paltry” 16% in science and engineering, we get most of the Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry, and medicine, and most of the world’s modern inventions — everything from the lightbulb to the computer — came from us.

How about this:

Despite their higher percentages, South Korea and China garner no Nobels in physics, chemistry, and medicine, and have contributed little in the way of innovation.

How about this:

The same idiocies used to be spouted by the George Wills of the world in the days of the former Soviet Union; i.e., “look at how many degrees in science and engineering they hand out; they will surely move ahead of us in science and technology!” The facts were these: (i) many bright students in the Soviet Union personally would have liked to go into one of the humanities — history, philosophy, economics, psychology, sociology, journalism — but DARED NOT DO SO, because those fields had been completely taken over by the State for the purposes of propaganda. If a historian or economist, for example, told the truth about Marxist history or Marxist economics, he would find himself in a gulag or a re-education camp. So many otherwise fine historians, economists, etc., went into the “hard” sciences and became mediocre engineers, physicists, and chemists, instead. They went into so-called “value-free” fields to keep themselves out of possible trouble with the political authorities. (ii) Despite the high number of students who became engineers and scientists, it didn’t help the Soviet Union; they still crashed and burned.

U.S. public education is completely screwed up, but it appears to be so across the board: it’s as screwed up in the quantitative sciences as much as it is in the social sciences, so the “paltry” 16% that somehow manage to tolerate the system and get through it to earn advanced degrees in science, probably represents exactly that proportion of the population that actually WANT to go into those subjects. There is absolutely no reason to force a greater number into a field that they have no gifts for.

George Will — like many ignorant journalists — doesn’t understand the idea of division-of-labor under conditions of freedom: everyone contributes, in his or her way, to the total economic health of the economy and therefore the country as a whole. The social sciences have as much to contribute to a country as the quantitative sciences do. And like everything else, it’s the quality of the contribution that counts, not the quantity.

I would hate to live in a country where a first-rate economist like Thomas Sowell was forced, for political reasons, to work as a third-rate engineer.


21 posted on 01/02/2011 1:04:34 PM PST by GoodDay (Palin for POTUS 2012)
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To: okie01
As a rule, "better products" are the realm of the small business and the entrepreneur. Large "Wall Street corporations" have never been leaders in innovation -- nor will they ever likely be. The culture just won't allow it.

This is an interesting subject. I want to believe what you say but there are so many exceptions. IBM has the most number of patents of any corporation (I've heard but can't confirm). Have they been able to bring products to market? Doesn't seem like it- at least for the last few decades. But what about the iphone and Apple? Apple is a large corporation and has been for nearly 25 years. There are many innovations coming out of the petrochemical and chemical industries and these are not ma and pa organizations? So it's a crazy mixed bag. I wish I understood it better.
22 posted on 01/02/2011 1:05:03 PM PST by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: truthguy
Unfortunately they are too busy exercising ingenuity in deriving new types of derivatives to give any thought to bringing actual breakthrough inventions to market and thus, in the past two years, have been surpassed in this regard by the City of London.

Our world economic leadership was created by our once unmatched ability to bring new breakthrough technology to market and is unlikely to survive if we do not restore that capability.

See The real cost of Enron.

23 posted on 01/02/2011 1:05:30 PM PST by AmericanVictory (Should we be more like them or they more like we used to be?)
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To: neverdem

All of the official institutions of “science”, such as the National Academy of Sciences, have been taken over by religious crackpots styling themselves as “climatologists”.
Giving them any more money is not a wise idea.

As I recall Nikola Tesla didn’t revolutionize our world with the help of tax money, he did it with risk capital from an entrepreneur named George Westinghouse.

Government is the problem, not the solution!


24 posted on 01/02/2011 1:05:50 PM PST by devere
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To: Lloyd227

” and protect his idea for commercialization, then to be allowed to actually keep the majority of profit from his idea “

No invention or idea - even if it’s world-changing - will bring our Nation out of its doldrums, as long as the only way it can be commercialized is to be manufactured overseas...

Abolish the anti-comptetitive regulatory alphabet agencies (and their underlying laws), and rationalize the taxation environment which rewards the entrenched and punishes the innovative - and then, maybe, we might breathe some life back in to the economy of this once-great Nation....


25 posted on 01/02/2011 1:07:08 PM PST by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: GoodDay

How long until Thomas Sowell’s job is outsourced?


26 posted on 01/02/2011 1:08:02 PM PST by Cringing Negativism Network (McCarthy was Right.)
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To: DManA
Will and others like him still cling to the belief that big government can do good things, that it just needs to be better directed.

Poor old George is someone, I'm sure, who thinks that government is a refuge for the nice. Unlike in the private sector (according to commonplace), nice guys with good ideas finish first in government: that's what he almost surely believes.

Granted that I myself am questionable on this count, but there's a fine line between "above it all" and "out of it." Poor George doesn't seem to realize that the fedral government is a refuge for blamers. If you chance upon a bureaucrat who seems to be monumentally stupid, best odds are you bumped into one who washes his/her hands with Blameum soap and considers then clean.

27 posted on 01/02/2011 1:11:33 PM PST by danielmryan
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To: truthguy

The rot is well-established in even our so-called ‘elite’ institutions - talk to any recent graduate/student at Cal Tech, MIT, Carnegie Mellon, etc. and listen to their sincere belief in and babble about “Green’ energy, etc. you get Sesame street logic wrapped in big words. When an MIT graduate level degreed ME claims the internal combustion engine was one of man’s (this was several years ago) most damaging inventions - you are NOT talking to anyone who understands engineering.


28 posted on 01/02/2011 1:13:47 PM PST by NHResident
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To: truthguy

The rot is well-established in even our so-called ‘elite’ institutions - talk to any recent graduate/student at Cal Tech, MIT, Carnegie Mellon, etc. and listen to their sincere belief in and babble about ‘Sreen’ energy, etc. you get Sesame Street logic wrapped in big words. When an MIT graduate level degreed ME claims the internal combustion engine was one of man’s (this was several years ago) most damaging inventions - you are NOT talking to anyone who understands engineering.


29 posted on 01/02/2011 1:14:31 PM PST by NHResident
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To: truthguy
As you noted, IBMs innovation is behind it. It passed from the hands of the founding entrepreneurs and original engineers into the hands of the financial managers.

Apple is still led by its founders -- and thus retains its innovativeness.

Corporations have a life cycle. And the more mature they become, the more likely they are to be led by the finance department or the legal department than they are by the engineering, operations or sales departments.

At that point, they usually become more concerned with maintaining their share of market and maximizing profits -- including acquisitions and mergers -- than they are with building share and internal product innovation.

The exceptions are, as I said, those companies with a vested interest in research -- which would include petrochemicals as well as pharmaceuticals.

A good example of what I'm talking about is the railroad business. By the late fifties, virtually every President or Chairman in the industry had come out of the Legal Department. And they were dying...

30 posted on 01/02/2011 1:18:29 PM PST by okie01 (THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA: Ignorance on Parade)
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To: danielmryan

That is the nature of government. It cannot be reformed, it cannot be fixed, it can’t be run like a business. It can and must only be minimized.


31 posted on 01/02/2011 1:19:15 PM PST by DManA
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To: okie01

IBM sold it’s personal computer business lock stock and barrel to China, which now not only makes them as “Lenovo” but also owns that business.

Apples are made there.

Neither is helping American jobs.


32 posted on 01/02/2011 1:20:56 PM PST by Cringing Negativism Network (McCarthy was Right.)
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To: truthguy

“These Boards of Directors need more scientists and engineers and less MBAs and Attorneys.”

I believe it was the head of Michelin that said if he needed MBA’s he would send his engineers back to school. He didn’t need anyone that didn’t know how to make tires first.


33 posted on 01/02/2011 1:26:08 PM PST by A Strict Constructionist (Oligarchy...never vote for the Ivy League candidate.)
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To: NHResident
When an MIT graduate level degreed ME claims the internal combustion engine was one of man’s (this was several years ago) most damaging inventions - you are NOT talking to anyone who understands engineering.

Yes, and this is frighting. I believe what you say and from my understanding MIT doesn't even have a humanities department to speak of. I guess it's too close to Harvard.

I work in Silicon Valley in technology and I've seen the same nonsense from recent college graduates. And the more prestigious the university, the worse it seems to be (read Cal and Stanford). We are on very rocky ground when those who are supposed to be our future leaders have become indoctrinated so easily. It's a consequence of the nonsense that has been pounded into their heads in grammar school, high school, and at the university level. Raw intelligence seems to be no defense against this propaganda.
34 posted on 01/02/2011 1:29:09 PM PST by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: AmericanVictory
Unfortunately they are too busy exercising ingenuity in deriving new types of derivatives to give any thought to bringing actual breakthrough inventions to market

Businessmen, surprise!, respond to the market. If more money can be made by financial manipulation, then they will manipulate rather than innovate. That's what businessmen do, indeed it is their proper function in society. Sniff out the way to make the most money with a given investment.

An even easier way to make money than financial manipulation is rent-seeking from the government. Risk-free money. An example of which is Will's notion of government investment in "research."

When governments determine buying and selling, the first things to be bought and sold are politicians. The problem is not to get business out of the government, it's to get government out of business. A is impossible, B is just really difficult.

35 posted on 01/02/2011 1:34:00 PM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: okie01
A good example of what I'm talking about is the railroad business. By the late fifties, virtually every President or Chairman in the industry had come out of the Legal Department. And they were dying...

Yes and perhaps that because of government regulation, lawsuits and the like, this gives and advantage to those who have a legal background as opposed to those who understand the technology. I'm just guessing. This is a very complicated subject and every time I see a trend, I see some type of exception.
36 posted on 01/02/2011 1:35:46 PM PST by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: Kent C
Sadly this is another example of George Will mailing it in. He used to be able to think and write creatively. Not so much any more.
37 posted on 01/02/2011 1:38:08 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: Uncle Ike
"Abolish the anti-comptetitive regulatory alphabet agencies (and their underlying laws), and rationalize the taxation environment which rewards the entrenched and punishes the innovative..."

I agree, well said

38 posted on 01/02/2011 1:47:44 PM PST by Lloyd227 (Class of 1998 (let's all help the Team McCain spider monkeys decide how to moderate))
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To: neverdem

Right out of “Atlas Shrugged”.


39 posted on 01/02/2011 2:20:56 PM PST by theymakemesick ( islam - inspired by Satan www.prophetofdoom.net)
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To: DManA
That is the nature of government. It cannot be reformed, it cannot be fixed, it can’t be run like a business. It can and must only be minimized.

Which leads to the question: does steering the government to a less destructive path end up helping or hurting?

40 posted on 01/02/2011 2:22:09 PM PST by danielmryan
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To: neverdem

As an alternative, one of the big drags on the consumer marketplace and business is patent and copyright “farming.” This means that companies who contribute nothing, make their money from the buying of patents and copyright, the sitting on them, wanting royalties from those who want to put them to good use.

Or worse, as with the immense media libraries: sitting on them, not marketing them, but not allowing anyone else to market them.

So the question should be raised: should the government grant or continue patents and copyrights that are anti-competitive, and a drag on the markets?

Comparatively speaking, the General Mining Act of 1872 was perhaps the most pro-business, pro-consumer, pro-industry law ever written.

It said that the mineral rights to land are separate from the ownership of land, and that anyone had a right to stake a mineral rights claim on any land not claimed, and could not be prevented from mining it.

Importantly, it had a “use it or lose it” clause, so that if you struck a claim, you had to either “improve” it to the tune of $500 a year, or sell its ore to the gross profit of $500 a year. If you didn’t, you lost your claim.

Of course, if you mined on someone else’s land, you had to pay negotiated, reasonable royalties. But the land owner could not stop you from mining.

Now imagine if these concepts were transferred to patent and copyright law.

You could patent or copyright your original idea or product, but to keep your government protection, you had to “use it or lose it”, and let others use it.

This is not impossible, and would cause an explosion in the marketplace, of a huge amount of content available to consumers.

It would be a huge shot in the arm to business as well.


41 posted on 01/02/2011 2:22:39 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: Cringing Negativism Network
"Neither is helping American jobs."

Would you or did you buy a computer made in the USA if it cost 2X what a Lenovo or Mac costs? Don't blame the companies, blame the consumer and the government. High Tech outsourcing is done to remain competitive because that is what the market demands. The only way to change that paradigm is to reduce the cost of doing business in the US (start with the 35% corporate income tax) and impose a tariff on manufactured goods.

42 posted on 01/02/2011 2:24:15 PM PST by Natural Law (Stay thirsty my friends)
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To: Sherman Logan

Witness DOE. A greater example of using subsidies to push research in wrong directions would be hard to find.


43 posted on 01/02/2011 2:29:01 PM PST by AmericanVictory (Should we be more like them or they more like we used to be?)
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To: Natural Law

I do blame the companies.

“Free traders” would sell their own mother to Beijing, if it saved a penny on production costs.

America is at risk. This is no longer a parlor game of make-believe “Atlas Shrugged”. We are destroying our own nation.

Time is running out.


44 posted on 01/02/2011 2:29:53 PM PST by Cringing Negativism Network (McCarthy was Right.)
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To: danielmryan
The question is moot. You can't steer government in what you consider a positive direction any more than you can steer a lion away from killing wildebeests. Any energy spent on a doomed enterprise is wasted. Worse than wasted. The energy is lost that could have been expended on a profitable enterprise.

Which leads to the question: does steering the government to a less destructive path end up helping or hurting?

45 posted on 01/02/2011 2:37:56 PM PST by DManA
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To: Cringing Negativism Network
"“Free traders” would sell their own mother to Beijing, if it saved a penny on production costs."

Free Traders only play the hand they have been dealt. They are answerable to the share holders and the prospect of losing market share and with it shareholder value will not be tolerated. Further blame the American consumer who price shops for everything. In a free market the equivalent good differentiated only by price will win out. Absent any tariff protections countries with lower labor costs, lower taxes and less regulation will beat the costs of US labor, high taxes and onerous regulations.

Given the right business environment those same "Free Traders" will kick the ass of any top down, oppressive society in the world just like they did in WWII.

46 posted on 01/02/2011 2:43:40 PM PST by Natural Law (Stay thirsty my friends)
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To: neverdem

And while they are at it, ban research into global warming. That will force them to focus on topics that we all agree on.


47 posted on 01/02/2011 2:51:09 PM PST by Brilliant
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To: truthguy

Nothing new, what we have in the Iphone etc, is new usage of existing product. Will is taking about a completely new item that will fire growth. Such as a cold fusion motor for cars. Little far fetched but it is only an example.


48 posted on 01/02/2011 2:51:16 PM PST by org.whodat
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To: Natural Law

Let’s then change our system so that producing domestically is the most profitable choice.

That means reducing regulations and bureaucracy.

Getting lawyers out of the way.

But the quickest step to start with, is (significant) import tariffs.

Remove the incentive to outsource.

As of 2009, the dollar value of our imports, was virtually identical (within a single percentage point) to our national tax bill.

So. Let’s shift that tax expense, to somewhere which will encourage production here:

Replace our entire tax code, with one single, across the board 100% import tariff.

Jobs will begin returning to America, immediately.

Of course there will be repercussions, but there are very significant, very real and very dangerous repercussions already to America, resulting from a process more efficient in it’s destructiveness, than if an enemy Air Force carpet bombed America’s factories.

We have destroyed the greatest manufacturing capacity, in human history.

Some day we will need that manufacturing capacity.

History has not stopped.

We need to act now, and begin bringing it back.


49 posted on 01/02/2011 2:52:46 PM PST by Cringing Negativism Network (McCarthy was Right.)
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To: AmericanVictory

True,


50 posted on 01/02/2011 2:53:36 PM PST by org.whodat
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