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To: TxDas

Thanks for your story about your Dad. He must have been a fine, fine gentleman. So few can survive under such pressure. It took exceptional courage (and some good luck).

I hope they took him off those missions after his third walk out. With the really bad case of malaria he had they probably did.

Me, I know I have been living on borrowed time since my Viet Nam days. How vastly more intense was his experience.

What you say about MacArthur being a publicity hound is true. “Self effacing” he certainly was not. He wanted everyone to see him as Mr. Amazing, as Mr. Incredible. He demanded worship but not excellence from his staff. I could go on. Like I said, a difficult man to like.

Still, I stand behind what I wrote earlier.


26 posted on 04/13/2011 7:17:18 PM PDT by Iris7 ("Do not live lies!" ...Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn)
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To: Iris7

My father was one of those who “survived the war but not the peace”. He struggled with his war experience until his premature death. He had a survival kit in the trunk of his car till the day he died and began to teach me escape and evasion at age 5.

He was a very accomplished person and became a high ranking official in the treasury department but the war defined him. He did not get back until late ‘45. No credit for jumping out of planes, just more air medals - 10. Officers got rotated, not enlisted men in the CBI.

However, my father had it easy compared to my mother’s brother who was a prisoner of war in New Guinea. He was about 90 lb on a 6 foot frame after they fattened him up before they sent him home. He never spoke about his experience, in fact barely spoke at all. He moved to Anchorage and became a watch repairman until age 33 when he laid his head on his bench and just died.

My father’s barely 18 y/o brother was cut in half by a MG42 in Luxembourg in the Battle of the Bulge about 1 week after arriving in the EOT. He died about 30 miles from where his father had been born in the Black Forest.

Reading Ambrose’s “Citizen Soldier, Band of Brothers” and Brady’s books, “Flags of out Fathers” & Flyboys” can be very difficult.

Thanks for listening


29 posted on 04/13/2011 9:36:43 PM PDT by TxDas (This above all, to thine ownself be true.)
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