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Freaking out for freeze-dried food
The Mail Tribune ^ | 4/22/11 | Mark Freeman

Posted on 04/22/2011 10:35:49 PM PDT by Kartographer

People freaked out about surviving world disasters and economic meltdown have made a run on freeze-dried food in the past month. As a result, Albany-based Oregon Freeze Dry Inc. — the country's largest supplier of freeze-dried camp food — won't accept any new orders through the 2011 camping season.

The company produces the widely sold Mountain House line of food pouches popular among everyone from overnight wilderness backpackers to Pacific Crest Trail devotees.

Oregon Freeze Dry officials say they have never seen this level of consumer panic over emergency preparedness in the company's 48-year history.

In the industry, the emergency-preparedness crowds are called "preppers," and they literally are taking food out of the mouths of hikers nationwide.

(Excerpt) Read more at mailtribune.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: bhoeconomy; dsj; economy; food; foodstorage; preparedness; preppers; prepping; preps; shtf; survival; survivalping; tshtf; urbansurvival
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Fellow Preppers you are not alone!
1 posted on 04/22/2011 10:35:50 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; Blue Jays; ...

PING!


2 posted on 04/22/2011 10:37:03 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; Blue Jays; ...

PING!


3 posted on 04/22/2011 10:37:54 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer
I have a store of Alpine Aire...
4 posted on 04/22/2011 10:42:48 PM PDT by eyedigress ((Old storm chaser from the west)?)
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To: Kartographer

Can’t have enough food, guns, and ammo for these days. Also wouldn’t hurt to have about $20,000,000,000 stashed, because you might want to buy a loaf of bread sometime.


5 posted on 04/22/2011 10:52:25 PM PDT by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: KoRn

$20,000,000,000? That’s with a coupon right?


6 posted on 04/22/2011 10:57:36 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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Food is food, but some of these taste awful.


7 posted on 04/22/2011 11:01:08 PM PDT by D-fendr
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To: Kartographer
In the industry, the emergency-preparedness crowds are called "preppers," and they literally are taking food out of the mouths of hikers nationwide.

What? Taking the food out of their mouths?

No mention of the huge government orders for long term storage food?

I'll go read the article and see...

8 posted on 04/22/2011 11:15:05 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: D-fendr

What’s in that cr*p that makes it last so long?
Chemicals are bad news imho.


9 posted on 04/22/2011 11:18:03 PM PDT by acapesket
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To: acapesket

Its freeze-dried.


10 posted on 04/22/2011 11:21:22 PM PDT by eyedigress ((Old storm chaser from the west)?)
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To: eyedigress

My bad. I am a little bit crazed when it comes to chemicals in food.


11 posted on 04/22/2011 11:31:13 PM PDT by acapesket
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To: acapesket

Get I-Tunes and it captures every song FR plays. :^)


12 posted on 04/22/2011 11:34:03 PM PDT by eyedigress ((Old storm chaser from the west)?)
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To: acapesket

No water makes it last a long time.


13 posted on 04/22/2011 11:34:37 PM PDT by DB
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To: Kartographer
I knew it would happen, however I have some questions. When we began to prepare we simply bought more groceries to rotate. This easily brought us to 6 months with the additional deep freeze. We also began to add raised gardens. As we got further along we began preparing dry bulk with food buckets, mylar bags and oxygen absorbers. Finally, we chose the expensive preparations of freeze dried for our very long term preps.

Freeze dried food is very expensive, but is good for very long term preps. We will be elderly before we must use them up. Why are people choosing freeze dried over store bought? It is much more economical and a good inflation hedge to purchase warehouse accordingly.

Secondly, many Americans are living paycheck to paycheck. These purchases would have to be from the wealthier. Is the freeze dried infrastructure limited as the shortages would indicate or is the prepper community much larger than one would think?

Finally, is it possible many have take the same route that we have and chosen freeze dried to finish up their preps?

Just some thoughts and questions.
14 posted on 04/22/2011 11:35:17 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: Kartographer

bump


15 posted on 04/22/2011 11:47:47 PM PDT by ProfoundMan (Time to finish the Reagan Revolution! - RightyPics.com)
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To: PA Engineer
Why are people choosing freeze dried over store bought?

I don't see that 'people' are. Last I heard govt was buying the bulk of it.

Dessicated soup, they called it during the Civil War.

Same, same.

Preppers have tools, land, friends, skills, and hopefully, the Grace of God with them.

All the other handwaving is the media trying to paint conservatives as dangerous (and we are, to crooks).

/johnny

16 posted on 04/23/2011 12:26:41 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: acapesket

It has nothing to do with chemicals or additives. It is the method of preservation ( freeze drying ) that makes it last. Storage conditions can also have an effect on freshness.


17 posted on 04/23/2011 2:19:49 AM PDT by Rearden (Deo Vindice)
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To: Kartographer

$20,000,000,000? That’s with a coupon right?

Nah, just the wheelbarrow.


18 posted on 04/23/2011 2:24:44 AM PDT by CrazyIvan (What's "My Struggle" in Kenyan?)
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To: CrazyIvan
emergency supplies
19 posted on 04/23/2011 2:41:03 AM PDT by Free America52 (The White guys are getting pissed off. We beat Hitler Hirohito and Krushchev. Obama will be easy.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I’m not sure that “people” aren’t buying this stuff, I know I have been buying some for a couple of years now. The backorders aren’t new either. My average wait time for an order to be filled has been about 10 weeks. Some items that were ordered were listed as not currently available and substitutions have been made.

I received an email this morning from FedEx advising me that an order that was placed Mar 1 was shipped, about 500 pounds, should be 10 cases of #10 cans.

I have a small farm with some livestock, chickens, rabbits, a huge garden, a small greenhouse (which is receiving a solar upgrade to make it useable year round, a fish pond, many wooded acres filled with deer and wild turkey.

We do a very good job here of providing for ourselves and growing what we eat, we even make our own beer, lol. Trouble is, we can’t grow everything, and we can’t grow anything in the winter. If my worst fears are realized, it will take who knows how long before things settle down and a barter economy of some sort starts up. In the interim, we will be totally on our own. For example, I can’t grow wheat but the family needs bread. Solution, I buy wheat in 6 gallon, sealed buckets and grind my own flour with a small grain mill. The price for the wheat is very reasonable as well.

We are currently using our home ground flour for weekly bread making, the taste is incredibly good. We also have begun to use some of the freeze dried items like onions, carrots, celery, etc. in our normal cooking to; 1. get used to the taste and texture of the food and, 2. learn how much to use in certain dishes, etc.

What, me worry? Yep, I’m a prepper.


20 posted on 04/23/2011 2:46:05 AM PDT by Rearden (Deo Vindice)
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To: KoRn
Also wouldn’t hurt to have about $20,000,000,000 stashed, because you might want to buy a loaf of bread sometime.
Or a 1942 nickle.
21 posted on 04/23/2011 4:29:16 AM PDT by samtheman
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To: Kartographer

What’s the shelf-life of canned food?


22 posted on 04/23/2011 4:29:45 AM PDT by samtheman
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To: Kartographer

Here’s a question I just thought of (don’t laugh, it’s just a question):

In an emergency, is it possible to soak rice in water to make it edible (if there is no heat source for cooking)? If so, how long must it soak?

Bags of rice have a 2-year shelf life and you can buy a 20lb bag for $15.


23 posted on 04/23/2011 4:41:53 AM PDT by samtheman
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To: Kartographer
I've stocked a few cases of these myself, but these are for travel only.

THere are more cost effective ways to stock on food... maybe not the greatest choices, but they are calories if ever needed to be called on.
Cans of stuff like ravioli, dried noodles, spam, etc.. find it on sale, but a few more cans. I'll last practically forever and doesn't cost 60 dollars for 12 freekin meals. Years from now when I have to throw it away, I won't be out all that much really so who cares.

24 posted on 04/23/2011 4:47:25 AM PDT by FunkyZero ("It's not about duck hunting !")
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To: samtheman

” What’s the shelf-life of canned food? “

Try here, for links to a lot of information on food storage in general...

http://grandpappy.info/hshelff.htm

[excerpt]

Canned Food Study One
A Food and Drug Administration Article about a shelf life test that was conducted on 100-year old canned foods that were retrieved from the Steamboat Bertrand can be read at the following link:

http://web.archive.org/web/20070509153848/http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/CONSUMER/CON00043.html

Following is a brief summary of a very small portion of the above article:

“Among the canned food items retrieved from the Bertrand in 1968 were brandied peaches, oysters, plum tomatoes, honey, and mixed vegetables. In 1974, chemists at the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) analyzed the products for bacterial contamination and nutrient value. Although the food had lost its fresh smell and appearance, the NFPA chemists detected no microbial growth and determined that the foods were as safe to eat as they had been when canned more than 100 years earlier. The nutrient values varied depending upon the product and nutrient. NFPA chemists Janet Dudek and Edgar Elkins report that significant amounts of vitamins C and A were lost. But protein levels remained high, and all calcium values ‘were comparable to today’s products.’”

“NFPA chemists also analyzed a 40-year-old can of corn found in the basement of a home in California. Again, the canning process had kept the corn safe from contaminants and from much nutrient loss. In addition, Dudek says, the kernels looked and smelled like recently canned corn.”

“According to a recent study cosponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and NFPA, canned foods provide the same nutritional value as fresh grocery produce and their frozen counterparts when prepared for the table. NFPA researchers compared six vegetables in three forms: home-cooked fresh, warmed canned, and prepared frozen. ‘Levels of 13 minerals, eight vitamins, and fiber in the foods were similar,’ says Dudek. In fact, in some cases the canned product contained high levels of some vitamins that in fresh produce are destroyed by light or exposure to air.”

[excerpt]

HTH


25 posted on 04/23/2011 5:03:46 AM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: samtheman

Normal rice (unlike converted or boil-in-bag) requires heat.

The shelf life of white rice is much longer than 2 years.


26 posted on 04/23/2011 5:32:05 AM PDT by Atlas Sneezed ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: Kartographer

God bless all of you FReepers for encouraging us to prepare gradually over the past 10 years.


27 posted on 04/23/2011 5:42:16 AM PDT by Caipirabob ( Communists... Socialists... Democrats...Traitors... Who can tell the difference?)
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To: Uncle Ike

A good large quantity of my preps are in canned food. I pick up a few every time I shop. A lot of people disagree, but I believe that modern canned food, stored in a climate controlled environment, will last a long, long time.


28 posted on 04/23/2011 5:42:49 AM PDT by suthener
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To: PA Engineer
Every earth quake and natural disaster ups the interest level in freeze dried food - doesn't go bad like fresh or frozen if the power is out, doesn't take the same work to rotate as canned, good for 20 years in case it just sits for a long time.

However, the shortages are more likely from that order FEMA put in for a million freeze dried food units, ostensibly for a midwest earthquake disaster.

29 posted on 04/23/2011 6:08:00 AM PDT by tbw2
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To: Kartographer

I remember reading a month or so ago that FEMA (or was it HLS?) had ordered a sh*tload of freeze dry foods and that it had profoundly impacted supply by these companies. Any connection here I wonder?


30 posted on 04/23/2011 6:18:10 AM PDT by wolf24
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To: Kartographer
In the industry, the emergency-preparedness crowds are called "preppers," and they literally are taking food out of the mouths of hikers nationwide.

Swear to God, people do not understand the Engligh language.

Literally? Acccording to this, preppers are going up to people and literally taking food from their mouths. Don't think so.
31 posted on 04/23/2011 6:20:23 AM PDT by Red in Blue PA (Let's apply the "reasonable man" standard to gun laws. How many would stand?)
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To: Kartographer

Wow!

Oregon Freeze Dry expected a 30-percent increase. That turned into a 400-percent increase in just 30 days, Cornutt states in her letter.


32 posted on 04/23/2011 6:22:55 AM PDT by Red in Blue PA (Let's apply the "reasonable man" standard to gun laws. How many would stand?)
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To: wolf24

FEMA denied it.....siad it was just an RFI.

(I have my doubts about that)


33 posted on 04/23/2011 6:23:52 AM PDT by Red in Blue PA (Let's apply the "reasonable man" standard to gun laws. How many would stand?)
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To: wolf24

The suppliers have made clear the shortages are NOT due to government orders.


34 posted on 04/23/2011 6:25:01 AM PDT by ctdonath2 (Great children's books - http://www.UsborneBooksGA.com)
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To: PA Engineer; Kartographer
We did a three month supply of Mountain House last April....being as SPACE is our critical problem, this was the way to go - two cartons stacked on an upper closet shelf.

We're in the desert, and garage storage for anything is out of the question; those constant 105 - 110 degree temps hurt everything from food to battery storage; we can't store a thing outside of the indoor environment.

35 posted on 04/23/2011 6:27:36 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (It's not the Obama Administration....it's the "Obama Regime".)
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To: ErnBatavia
An idea:

I use old non-functioning deep freezers outside in my shed for storage. Heat, humidity, bugs and varmits are a big problem here, the deep freezer helps with all.

36 posted on 04/23/2011 6:42:00 AM PDT by blam
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To: Beelzebubba

Personal experience; 10 yr old white rice stored in plastic pails, sealed up after being flooded with CO2 (the “dry ice treatment”) is just the same as if you bought it yesterday.


37 posted on 04/23/2011 6:43:07 AM PDT by misanthrope (Liberals just plain suck!!)
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To: ErnBatavia

” We did a three month supply of Mountain House last April.... “

I really hope that you’re thinking and planning out beyond a three-month time horizon...

IMO, stored stuff is not an end in itself - it’s something to buy enough time to make the lifestyle adjustments - changes - that are going to be required to survive, and perhaps, even thrive, in a world that’s about to change catastrophically, and permanently....


38 posted on 04/23/2011 6:46:32 AM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: samtheman
Bags of rice have a 2-year shelf life and you can buy a 20lb bag for $15.

We have several 20 lb bags of white rice we bought at SAM'S Club for Y2K. We use it almost daily and it is still perfectly good. It is about 12 years old now.

We keep it in our basement in it's original plastic bags. We have taken no special precautions other than storing it in plastic storage tubs bought at Wal Mart (not air tight, no Oxygen inhibitor) just to keep it dry and any vermin out. The basement is dry but has little heat and the temperatures range from 40-80 degrees depending on time of year. We do run a portable humidifier during the summer or when it is wet outside in the Spring and Fall.

As we eat it up, we replace it and have added additional quantities. The price has really gone up recently but it is still a great bargain. It is cheap and easy eating. It is versatile and it can be cooked and then mixed with and nicely flavored with practically anything to make a hearty supplement or even a full meal.

It makes a lot of meals for only pennies. It is a major staple for our diet and will be especially so if things turn really bad.

39 posted on 04/23/2011 7:03:48 AM PDT by Gritty (Obama's domestic policy is turn the USA into Detroit at a projected cost of $13 trillion-James Lewis)
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To: samtheman

The general rule is two years on most canned foods. But as long as the can is not damaged or swelled many canned foods are eatable for years. Of course the older they get you do have a lost of some of their favor and vitamin content, but still usable.

There are cases of canned foods from shipwrecks 50-60-100 or more years old and when open being found to be still good.

So rotate and store what your eat and eat what you store.

AND DON’T FOR GET A GOOD CAN OPENER! AND MORE THAN ONE!


40 posted on 04/23/2011 7:18:56 AM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: samtheman

Hard to tell, but well beyond the “sell-by” date printed on the can.

There are plenty of online resources with great advice, but the best early-warning system for spoiled food is your eyes and nose. If a can is bulging, throw it out; if it smells rotten it probably is.


41 posted on 04/23/2011 7:25:15 AM PDT by snowrip (Liberal? You are a socialist idiot with no rational argument.)
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To: samtheman; ChocChipCookie
In an emergency, is it possible to soak rice in water to make it edible (if there is no heat source for cooking)? If so, how long must it soak?

Not that I am aware of, Cookie?
Look into getting or making a volcano stove. There are plans for on in my Preparedness Manual and a link to one you can get premake on Cookie's Blog: Survival Mom or just Google Volcano stove. They are very efficant and will burn just about anything and will allow you to cook your food.
42 posted on 04/23/2011 7:27:14 AM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: acapesket
I am a little bit crazed when it comes to chemicals in food.

Better not eat anything then. Every thing you eat, breath, drink and touch is made of chemicals. Including you.

43 posted on 04/23/2011 7:27:21 AM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (When all you have is bolt cutters & vodka everything looks like the lock on Wolf Blitzer's boathouse)
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To: Kartographer
the emergency-preparedness crowds are called "preppers," and they literally are taking food out of the mouths of hikers nationwide

Of course, it's the preppers' fault.

nothing says "buy freeze-dried food" louder than a 9.0 earthquake in Japan

Or the Soros puppet out to destroy the free world.

44 posted on 04/23/2011 7:30:17 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: Kartographer

Freeze dried chow is a ticket to constipationville. I’ve switched to canned food. I think it’s more nutritious and better tasting. A can of pineapple chunks in juice is much better than gnawing like a mouse on freeze-dried apples.

And if you prefer freeze-dried, the local grocery stores can provide pretty much everything you want, except the exotic stuff like taco flavored TVP, about the only recycled shoe leather I ever found tolerable.


45 posted on 04/23/2011 7:31:48 AM PDT by sergeantdave (The democrat party is a seditious organization and must be outlawed)
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To: Smokin' Joe
No mention of the huge government orders for long term storage food?

No, mention of that at all. If nothing else, we can all be thankful Moochelle will be well fed while the rest of the country starves.

46 posted on 04/23/2011 7:32:35 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: samtheman

“In an emergency, is it possible to soak rice in water to make it edible (if there is no heat source for cooking)? If so, how long must it soak?”

http://www.solarcooking.org/plans/

There’s always a heat source. Make a solar oven with the kids using a cardboard box and a roll of foil. Fold it up and store it away for that emergency.

http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Pasta_%26_Rice

Solar cooked rice is very easy and has a good nutty taste.


47 posted on 04/23/2011 7:47:39 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: KoRn

Do you see the mistake in your thinking?
Don’t stash your wealth in dollars!


48 posted on 04/23/2011 7:47:55 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working for)
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To: Uncle Ike

OTOH, if the canned fruit ferments, it’s party time.


49 posted on 04/23/2011 7:52:31 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: Uncle Ike

When I was in the Navy, on a 6 month tour at sea, we were very low on food. They broke out the canned bacon and other foods canned during WW2 and that was all we had for several weeks. Wasn’t bad as I recall. The stuff was over 20 years old at the time.


50 posted on 04/23/2011 7:59:01 AM PDT by antisocial (Texas SCV - Deo Vindice)
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