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Phony fears on fracking (20,000 NY State jobs not created because of opponents of gas exploration)
New York Post ^ | 05/20/2011 | Michael Benjamin

Posted on 05/20/2011 6:20:34 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

Opponents of gas exploration have time and again raised the ghastly specter of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) contaminating water supplies. The process uses water, sand and chemicals injected under high pressure to break dense rock to release trapped oil and gas. But these "fracking" fears are false.

Most recently, Duke University researchers purportedly found trace methane gas in well water near gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region. Yet naturally occurring trace methane is found in well water nationwide. The study is meaningless, because it presents no baseline data on methane in well water, and also fails to distinguish between methane that's naturally present in well water and manmade methane contamination.

Supporters of gas exploration agree that the state must take all necessary precautions to ensure that drinking water in the Southern Tier remains safe and plentiful. Contrary to critics' suggestions, New York City's watershed, like those of our state's other major cities, is protected and off-limits to natural-gas exploration.

It recently came out that $1 billion in state pension funds is invested in companies involved in natural-gas exploration. State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli says he's been urging the companies to make their operations environmentally friendly. Apparently, he understands that gas exploration is not necessarily a threat to water quality.

The additives used in "fracking" fluid are well known. Last summer, nine drilling companies provided the US Environmental Protection Agency with detailed information on those chemicals.

We know that 99.5 percent of fracking fluid is water and sand. The rest is comprised of commonly used compounds -- many of them chemicals used in water treatment, pharmaceuticals and automotive care.

(Excerpt) Read more at nypost.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events; US: New York
KEYWORDS: environmentalism; fracking; naturalgas

1 posted on 05/20/2011 6:20:39 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

That Marcellus shale region is massive. Enough to provide for NYS for 1000 years.


2 posted on 05/20/2011 6:21:56 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Sacajaweau
I have been reading up on how the residents of Towanda PA has become so rich they have been begging for Financial Planners from outside the area. Must be nice!
3 posted on 05/20/2011 6:23:52 AM PDT by angcat (DEAR GOD PLEASE SAVE US!)
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To: Sacajaweau

From what I understand we could get enought natural from there gas to convert all our cars to run on it for next to nothing


4 posted on 05/20/2011 6:24:05 AM PDT by Mr. K (this administration is WEARING OUT MY CAPSLOCK KEY~!! [Palin/Bachman 2012])
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To: Mr. K

A friend of mine went to Alaska...met up with some Indians. Said they all drove broncos, never worked a day...just collected “oil” checks.....and the amounts were huge.


5 posted on 05/20/2011 6:28:40 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Sacajaweau

RE: That Marcellus shale region is massive. Enough to provide for NYS for 1000 years.

_______________________________________________________________________

Yes, and that’s just what has been DISCOVERED. It has been estimated that Marcellus shale is large enough to provide for America’s Natural Gas needs for generations.

Upstate New York NEEDS the jobs. Unfortunately, we have been studying the environmental issue for years ... ANALYSIS PARALYSIS.


6 posted on 05/20/2011 6:30:38 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (u)
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To: Sacajaweau
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
7 posted on 05/20/2011 6:31:38 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: cripplecreek

I’m a New Yorker...have some very old books showing the Marcellus Shale region.


8 posted on 05/20/2011 6:34:26 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: SeekAndFind

From what I hear, most of the problems stem not from the fracking fluids, but from natural deposits that are released as a result of the drilling. I used to a skeptic of these complaints, but lately some of the complaints seem valid. I’m a big supporter of nat gas here in PA, but if a company ruins a domestic well, they should fix it.


9 posted on 05/20/2011 6:38:29 AM PDT by Racer1
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To: Racer1

RE: I’m a big supporter of nat gas here in PA, but if a company ruins a domestic well, they should fix it.

This isn’t really an EITHER/OR thing. It can be a BOTH/AND thing.

Why can’t we ALLOW drilling while at the same time IMPLEMENT and REGUALTE strict environmental standards?


10 posted on 05/20/2011 6:40:10 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (u)
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To: SeekAndFind

That is just what I said.


11 posted on 05/20/2011 6:42:28 AM PDT by Racer1
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To: SeekAndFind

If we were to discover an immense reserve of conventional petroleum in the continental United States these same people would be out banging their drum about the many reasons we must not use it. The one thing they can not say is their real reason for their opposition to our use of our resources...their goal is to further deindustrialize the nation in the name of their sustainable no-growth religion.


12 posted on 05/20/2011 6:44:27 AM PDT by dogcaller
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To: SeekAndFind

Thankfully in Pennsylvania our Governor and most of our officials recognize the value in this. Not that the Enviros aren’t still trying to monkeywrench it.


13 posted on 05/20/2011 6:58:25 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: SeekAndFind

In the old days of shallow drinking wells on farms, it was well known that one could suffocate from gas in the well.

Experienced workers would always go down with a rope around them and a competent worker to pull them out.

These were 30 and 50 ft. wells.

So methane is where you find it.

What do you think the old days of the canary in the coal mine was all about?

Tree hugger scare tactics is what it is all about.


14 posted on 05/20/2011 7:02:39 AM PDT by old curmudgeon
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To: SeekAndFind

“Opponents of gas exploration have time and again raised the ghastly specter of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) contaminating water supplies.”

Fine. Let them read by candle light and heat their homes with wood burning stoves.


15 posted on 05/20/2011 7:09:40 AM PDT by SharpRightTurn (White, black, and red all over--America's affirmative action, metrosexual president.)
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To: old curmudgeon
n 1911 Michigan's first commercial natural gas well began production. The tabulation of "Reported Discoveries of Gas in Michigan" in the Geological Survey Bulletins is longer than the oil well list and included 116 wells. These were mostly located in ­southeastern Michigan, including Macomb, Oakland, St. Clair and Wayne counties as well as in Manistee County in western Michigan. Many of the early natural gas discoveries were most likely made not as a result of a search for oil or natural gas but were instead test wells drilled for salt or for fresh water. Strong flows of gas from water wells are not unusual in southeastern Michigan and sometimes the shallower rims of the basin can still provide a surprise. In the mid 1980s holes drilled to provide footings for a highway overpass in St. Clair County "blew out" with natural gas. The flow of gas from these early wells was usually quite small. The largest volume of natural gas was in St. Clair County were wells supplied "several families" in one case, "pumps, drills and two houses" in another case and "one house" in a number of instances.

Michigan Oil and Natural Gas Exploration Before 1925
16 posted on 05/20/2011 7:16:03 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: SeekAndFind
Why can’t we ALLOW drilling while at the same time IMPLEMENT and REGUALTE strict environmental standards?

Do you really think there is no regulation? The problem is OVER-regulation.

17 posted on 05/20/2011 7:18:25 AM PDT by Siena Dreaming
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To: Siena Dreaming

OK, let’s use the right word — REASONABLE REGULATION.

The problem we have is the word “Reasonable” has become so elastic that the definition has become almost meaningless.


18 posted on 05/20/2011 7:19:51 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (u)
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To: Buckeye McFrog

RE: Thankfully in Pennsylvania our Governor and most of our officials recognize the value in this. Not that the Enviros aren’t still trying to monkeywrench it.


So, how’s the water in PA? Is it chemically polluted as the enviros in NYS fear if fracking were allowed?


19 posted on 05/20/2011 7:22:41 AM PDT by SeekAndFind (u)
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To: cripplecreek

Thank you.

Excellent information.


20 posted on 05/20/2011 7:30:16 AM PDT by old curmudgeon
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To: dogcaller

The energy policy of the Left is no energy. They have even gone to court to stop construction of a solar field in the Mojave Desert, and of course we have the no windmills off the coast of Nantucket thing.


21 posted on 05/20/2011 7:51:56 AM PDT by redangus
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To: SeekAndFind

Here is an opportunity... a separator tank for every home so the gas can be used for energy and the water is still potable!

The “Frackarator”... (inventors take note :)


22 posted on 05/20/2011 8:08:38 AM PDT by StraightDave (.)
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To: Racer1

Unless there is enough methane in the water for it to burn when lit then there is no worry. Trace amounts are just scare tactics.


23 posted on 05/20/2011 11:01:40 AM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot (I retain the right to be inconsistent, contradictory and even flat-out wrong!)
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