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Who are we kidding? Of course it’s Netflix vs. cable (Dinosaur Media DeathWatch™)
Gigaom ^ | June 14, 2011 | Janko Roettgers

Posted on 06/15/2011 1:05:37 PM PDT by abb

Ask Netflix about cord cutting, and it’ll tell you: “It’s not happening, it’s not anything we are causing, cable and Netflix are complementary.” Then take a look at the actions of service operators, cable networks, consumers and even Netflix itself, and you’re going to see a decidedly different picture: Cable and Netflix are competing for the same eyeballs, the same money and the same TV real estate, and the fight is getting tougher by the day.

Not convinced yet? Then consider this evidence:

Consumers are ready to jump ship. Netflix users that stream the company’s videos to connected devices are twice as likely to at least downgrade, if not outright cancel their cable TV subscription than they were just a year ago, according to a new study from The Diffusion Group (TDG). Thirty-two percent of these Netflix users are thinking about calling their cable company. “Despite its rhetorical positioning, both Netflix and Pay TV operators have long been aware that there will come a point at which its services are not only dilutive to regular TV viewing, but antithetical to Pay TV subscription levels,” said TDG’s Michael Greeson. In other words: In the long run, Netflix will inevitably lead to cord cutting.

Content licensing is getting more competitive. Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos revealed recently that Netflix is now at the table for pretty much any TV licensing deal. So why aren’t Netflix customers buying more content? Because some of the networks simply don’t like to share. Netflix would prefer cheaper, non-exclusive licensing deals, which would make it possible to get more bang for its buck. However, HBO and increasingly Showtime are insisting on exclusive content to prevent subscribers from jumping ship.

Many observers thought Netflix wanted in on this game when the company bought the rights to its first-ever exclusive show House of Cards this spring. Sarandos, however, said that it was exactly the other way around: Netflix was getting concerned that it would get shut out of too many deals for attractive serialized content, which is increasingly going exclusively to programmers like HBO, so it saw itself forced to act.

Cable companies castrate their TiVos. A number of cable companies now offer their customers TiVo-branded DVRs that offer access to all kinds of additional online content. But TiVo users who buy their devices at retail will be able to watch videos from Netflix and Hulu Plus with these machines, while customers who rent the same DVR from their cable company won’t have access to these two services. The logic? Netflix could get people to ditch their premium channels and ignore cable VOD.

Netflix is dominating every screen. Network operators are trying to bring TV everywhere, but they often must feel like the hare racing the porcupine: Wherever they look, Netflix is already there. The company’s service is now available on more than 250 devices, and Netflix is getting more aggressive about dominating every single screen. The latest ploy is a dedicated Netflix button on your remote control, which puts it in direct competition with your cable guide. That raises the question: Do you want to browse through thousands of channels, or simply access Netflix?

Incumbents are putting a cap on it. If you’re a network operator, how do you keep your customers from canceling premium pay TV services to watch everything online? Canadian ISPs seem to think that bandwidth caps are the answer, and they’ve been enforcing strict data diets for years. ISPs that charge consumers up to $2.50 per GB once they exceed caps as little as 2 GB per month have been a real problem for Netflix north of the border, forcing the company to default to SD-quality streaming for all Canadian customers.

There’s been some movement with regards to bandwidth pricing in Canada in recent months, but the conditions are telling: Shaw recently introduced generous 1TB caps and even unlimited data plans, but those are reserved for customers who have a pay TV subscription as well. Bandwidth caps in the U.S. are generally higher, but not really that generous either, especially if you’re a heavy Netflix user.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: advertising; cable; dbm; movies
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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To: abb
Cable/satellite is more than half paid commercial channels selling something anyway, at least it is at night, when I watch it (or not, as is mostly the case). I would not be surprised if the cable/satellite companies make a profit just on those channels, disregarding the monthly subscription they charge.

And they repeat the same shows over and over, ad nauseum. One night, the same Criminal Minds episode was on three different channels, and how many That Metal Show's did they record? 6? I see the same ones listed over and over. They charge highway robbery for sports season passes. It's a mess.

51 posted on 06/15/2011 1:59:15 PM PDT by jeffc (Prayer. It's freedom of speech.)
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To: abb

http://newsosaur.blogspot.com/2011/06/value-of-journalism-sir-is-not-zero.html#comments
The value of journalism, sir, is not ‘zero’

http://adage.com/article/mediaworks/cable-sees-apple-netflix-biggest-competitor/228182/
Big Cable Sees Apple, Not Netflix, as Biggest Competitor
Time Warner, Comcast, News Corp. Say Interfaces Present the Industry’s Biggest Opportunity, Challenge


52 posted on 06/15/2011 1:59:49 PM PDT by abb
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To: Notary Sojac

You can’t really throttle the TV service. When it’s on it’s on. And given how much they’re forced to charge any kind of limitations would just drive customers away. Internet data throughput is able to be throttled. Eventually either their infrastructure will grow to handle it or the TV business will have shrunk enough to reduce the drag on the bandwidth.


53 posted on 06/15/2011 2:02:49 PM PDT by discostu (Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn)
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To: perfect_rovian_storm
Netflix is charging you for a service that is increasingly monopolizing the ISPs networks. Either the ISPs can work a deal with Netflix, which will cause Netflix users to pay more for Netflix, OR the government can step in with ‘neutrality’ and the ISPs shift the cost to the end users, so EVERYONE WITH AN INTERNET CONNECTION WILL PAY FOR YOUR DAMN NETFLIX!!!!!!!

Or the ISPs could charge on a metered usage basis, collecting more revenue from users who consume more bandwidth just as the power water utilities charge more for greater usage. But then that would mean the ISPs couldn't charge a flat fee and collect $60 a month from the folks who only use a minute fraction of their allotted bandwidth. Since they stick with the current flat-rate pricing model, it's safe to assume they make a bigger profit this way. And that means you're already paying for Netflix and other high-bandwidth services whether you use them or not.
54 posted on 06/15/2011 2:04:32 PM PDT by AnotherUnixGeek
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To: OpusatFR
I can choose what I want to watch from Netflix.

I use Netflix. However, I discovered that most older movies must be sent to you in DVD format. Why can't they just stream them to me??

55 posted on 06/15/2011 2:08:14 PM PDT by ExtremeUnction
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To: abb

Does Netflix put a little annoying logo in one corner of the screen like all the cable movie channels do?

If not, it’s a big selling point.


56 posted on 06/15/2011 2:08:41 PM PDT by Two Kids' Dad ((((( )))))
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To: discostu

See here for the latest.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/06/1gbps-fiber-for-70in-america-yup.ars
1Gbps fiber for $70—in America? Yup.

http://caivn.org/article/2011/06/13/california-isp-may-render-net-neutrality-laws-unnecessary
California ISP may render “Net Neutrality” laws unnecessary


57 posted on 06/15/2011 2:10:02 PM PDT by abb
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To: abb

http://www.mediabistro.com/tvnewser/frontline-ep-calls-for-creation-of-journalism-fund_b71394
‘Frontline’ EP calls for creation of (public) Journalism Fund

http://blogs.forbes.com/jeffbercovici/2011/06/14/digital-subscriptions-will-lift-magazines-but-not-newspapers/
Digital Subscriptions Will Lift Magazines But Not Newspapers

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/entertainmentnewsbuzz/2011/06/media-company-chiefs-confront-challenges-facing-the-cable-television-industry.html
Media chiefs confront challenges facing cable TV industry


58 posted on 06/15/2011 2:13:33 PM PDT by abb
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To: perfect_rovian_storm
You can shift it around any way you like, but that cost is going to have to be paid by someone.

Netflix already pays Level 3 Communications quite dearly for backbone transport to get the information out. You pay your ISP quite a bit to get the information in. Their payment helps fund the infrastructure for their side on the Internet, your payment helps fund the infrastructure for your side of the Internet. That is how the Internet works. That is where net neutrality operates. This is what cable companies want to kill in order to retain a dying business model.

God forbid the ISP has to build out its infrastructure more to accommodate the information the ISP's paying customers request. That's right, the users. Netflix doesn't force data down the ISP's pipes, the customers of the ISP request it.

If you don't want to pay as much, then get a lower-bandwidth, lower-cost plan, or get a data-capped plan. Let the heavy users buy the more expensive plans. Otherwise, the same two values of bits are used regardless of whether it comes from Netflix, Hulu, P2P, YouTube, gaming, or if Papa John's started digitizing pizzas and sending them over the Internet. I don't want to have a problem ordering a book from Amazon because my ISP made a deal with Barnes & Noble. That is not how the Internet works, that is not the model that made business on the Internet so successful.

59 posted on 06/15/2011 2:16:38 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: abb

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=152448&nid=127873
Estimated 33% of Viewers Multitask While Watching TV

http://www.chicagobusiness.com/section/blogs?blogID=shia-kapos&plckController=Blog&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&plckPostId=Blog:32246edb-06fb-4784-9008-b3233e7480b9Post:75547645-edf9-472e-927b-2b697c807453&sid=sitelife.chicagobusiness.com
Former editor O’Shea dishes on Tribune’s travails


60 posted on 06/15/2011 2:18:49 PM PDT by abb
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To: Grunthor
Dish Network?

If so, few words of advice after I pontificate right quick. I just ditched Dish a couple months ago as well in favor of exactly what you are planning. The first couple weeks are the usual twitches and re-adjustment. Following that, your house will become nice and QUIET. The whole place will settle down.
Now, on the dish front, DEMAND they send enough boxes for ALL the gear. Dish included. They just tried hammering me for $400.00 because I did not return their HD dish. THEIR letter stated nothing of the sort; only receiver and remote. They will send you a box for the receiver and remote plus a UPS pickup tag, but truly, it's not fit for shipping electronics, so take pictures on arrival of the shipping materials and upon sealing the box before shipping.
Now, this part made me laugh. They sent the shipping materials which took a couple weeks to arrive. They also turned my account over to a collections agency because they did not receive their electronics back. Mind you, the collections agency called me BEFORE the shipping materials arrived. As well, they tried squeezing in an extra month's payment from me because they "had not received their devices back". Be careful with them and document everything. It seems if you want to exit, they get a little testy.

Honestly, I'm never getting involved with any "provider" again. Especially Dish.

61 posted on 06/15/2011 2:20:05 PM PDT by Michael Barnes
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To: abb
I am sick of HBO's R and X rated filth, left wing documentaries and propaganda movies. I don't want to pay for 15 MTV's and 25 ESPN's just to get the Boomerang channel. I like movies and family friendly TV. With Netflix I get what I want when I want and I don't have to pay for a bunch of X rated junk.

Netflix shows a lot of Christian and family friendly stuff that I didn't know existed. I have often wondered what TV would look like if people could pick what shows they get, and Netflix is showing us that. I predict that eventually this will be driving more family friendly movies and other programming since HBO and Comcast aren't making the decisions anymore.

62 posted on 06/15/2011 2:21:05 PM PDT by sportutegrl
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To: subterfuge

I’m looking at AT&T. They’re offering high speed internet and phone for $41. That beats Comcast all hollow. I just have to have my son check the internet speed to make sure it isn’t too slow for Netflix.


63 posted on 06/15/2011 2:21:54 PM PDT by Politicalmom ("Obama has put the wrong gas in the tank of our economy."-Herman Cain)
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To: OriginalChristian

I stuck a traditional antenna in the attic and connected it up to the house cable network. I now have 30+ local channels for free, 7 different hidef feeds. We don’t watch much broadcast scheduling but the local news and weather in HD looks spectacular! Total cost about $150 including antenna, cables, booster and connectors with the cost averaging less than $20/year since installation about 8 years ago.

A real bargain.


64 posted on 06/15/2011 2:24:20 PM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: Two Kids' Dad

No, they do not.

And, there are no random pop-up lower border ads for the next scheduled show with animated figures distracting you, either.


65 posted on 06/15/2011 2:29:40 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: Notary Sojac

—————This is what “net neutrality” is about.-—————

I understand the argument. The sales pitch for net neutrality is indeed a good one. One that I even supported initially, before the details surfaced.

The problem is the details. With few exceptions, at all levels the details don’t stack up.

When you look at what the FCC officials are saying, they don’t speak the tongue of a regulator which seeks to keep the markets in order. The FCC officials speak the tongue of a totalitarian.

Same thing with the FCC’s preferred advocates. Not innocent bystanders, but directly involved cohorts. Free Press. They are marxists. As are many of the people that the primary leaders of the FCC surround themselves with. Indeed, Obama’s Czar over at the FCC is mark lloyd, who loves Chavez.

The point is this. Net neutrality is sold as something pro freedom.

But the details point to something that is very anti freedom. All of what I’ve said is provable, and has been posted on free republic for anybody to see for themselves.


66 posted on 06/15/2011 2:30:37 PM PDT by Halfmanhalfamazing ( The liberal media is more ideologically pure than Barack Obama)
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To: abb

It’s also Netflix AND cable versus free download sites.

Last week three of the biggest free sites - loombo, frogmovs and another were shut down.

All the media is out there for someone to charge for, and no one will.

“Get Smart” isn’t available for pay on the internet or cable, but it is available free.


67 posted on 06/15/2011 2:31:41 PM PDT by mrsmith
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To: Michael Barnes

When we cancelled DirecTV, I asked about sending back the receiver/dish/remote. They said they belonged to us, but that we would get a pre-addressed envelope for the data cards (we had 2 receivers). Hasn’t come yet, but, I am sure it will. We also got a bill saying no payment due. I suspect they hope we will resubscribe.


68 posted on 06/15/2011 2:33:46 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Explain. I have fiber to the door for everything. I saw nothing but improvements after switching to FIOS years ago.


69 posted on 06/15/2011 2:33:53 PM PDT by Melas (Sent via Galaxy Tab)
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To: Michael Barnes

When we cancelled DirecTV, I asked about sending back the receiver/dish/remote. They said they belonged to us, but that we would get a pre-addressed envelope for the data cards (we had 2 receivers). Hasn’t come yet, but, I am sure it will. We also got a bill saying no payment due. I suspect they hope we will resubscribe.


70 posted on 06/15/2011 2:34:38 PM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: abb; antiRepublicrat

———————He’s not used the term “universal service” yet, but he’s hitting all around it.——————

You must mean these two:

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=152457

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/469751-The_Cable_Show_2011_Genachowski_Broadband_Adoption_Just_Not_Good_Enough_.php

There is a reason why JG is the FCC chairman and not Clyburn or Copps. He is slicker than they are. They are too honest about the true intent of net neutrality.

The powers that be within Obama/admin and company don’t want people seeing the truth about internet regulatory schemes until it’s too late.


71 posted on 06/15/2011 2:35:51 PM PDT by Halfmanhalfamazing ( The liberal media is more ideologically pure than Barack Obama)
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To: Steely Tom

I’m loving Netflix. The movie “The Vanishing on 7th street” is on instant tomorrow, “The Tourist” will be on instant July 7th, and they have all the spisodes of Veronica mars, buffy, Angel, sons of anarchy and melrose place (my guilty pleasure) on there. I really like it.


72 posted on 06/15/2011 2:37:48 PM PDT by chae (I was anti-Obama before it was cool)
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To: perfect_rovian_storm

“EVERYONE WITH AN INTERNET CONNECTION WILL PAY FOR YOUR DAMN NETFLIX!!!!!!!”

“I don’t use Netflix. I don’t plan on using Netflix and I don’t feel I should have to pay for your Netflix.”

Do you work in the industry? I ask because I think that is a red herring. The wholesale cost of data is minimal. The real fight is to keep up the retail cost of data. Replacing $120/mo data with $9/mo data is a real threat to the industry. The cost of actually sending that data is inconsequential in comparison.

I can see you being upset enough to find the cap lock key if your living depends on people buying that $120 package.


73 posted on 06/15/2011 2:38:55 PM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: Halfmanhalfamazing

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_service

The concept of universal service appears to have originated with Rowland Hill and the Uniform Penny Post which he introduced in the United Kingdom in 1837. Though Hill never used the term “universal service”, his postal system had the hallmarks of early universal service; postal rates were reduced to uniform rates throughout the nation which were affordable to most Britons, enabled by the postage stamp (first introduced here) and a General Post Office monopoly on mail. Hill’s reforms were quickly adopted by postal authorities worldwide, including the United States Post Office Department (now the United States Postal Service) which already held a monopoly through the Private Express Statutes. The service obligations of USPS under current law are commonly referred to as the “universal service obligation” or “USO”. Universal service is also a key objective of the Universal Postal Union.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Penny_Post

The Uniform Penny Post was a component of the comprehensive reform of the Royal Mail, the UK’s official postal service, that took place in the 19th century. The reforms were a government initiative to eradicate the abuse and corruption of the existing service. Under the reforms, the postal service became a government monopoly, but it also became more accessible to the British population at large through setting a charge of one penny for carriage and delivery between any two places in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland irrespective of distance.[1][2][3]


74 posted on 06/15/2011 2:40:28 PM PDT by abb
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To: Melas

Fiber to the door, for those lucky enough to have it available, usually does grant a quantum boost in quality. The appropriate comparison for most customers is with DSL, and either one compared to cable companies’ internet service depends on the router infrastructure. Cable companies claim to beat the pants off of DSL but that’s best-case. When all your cable neighbors are downloading, there’s a bottleneck at the router serving them all.


75 posted on 06/15/2011 2:42:33 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Hawk)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

DVR’s are going the way of the dodo. I’ve had one since the early Tivo, and my current DVRS get almost zero use. Why should I spend the time to record a show to watch later, when I can watch it on demand any time after it’s premier and save myself a step? I use my cable subscription in almost exactly the same manner as I use Netflix. The only thing that’s truly different is the color of the menu.


76 posted on 06/15/2011 2:45:10 PM PDT by Melas (Sent via Galaxy Tab)
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To: abb

Cable companies did this to themselves. They fought against ala cart programming tooth and nail.

We cut cable because we don’t want to have to have 5 MTV’s, BET, 3 Disney’s, 15 home shopping channels, and whatever else they will force down our throats.

We don’t like blocking the channels, because it became a pain in the arse. When flipping channels, it would stop on blocked channels for 7-10 seconds. Plus, why pay for all the commercials?

If cable would end the packaging, and offer ala cart, I would pay for 1 or 2 channels at $5 a month per channel. But they know MTV, Oxygen (or the new Oprah channel) and the other crap channels would go out of business, no one is going to pay for the privileged of their kids watching MTV or Disney (both equally responsible for the horrible erosion of our society, imo).

If cable wants to survive, they will have to go to ala-cart, offer better programming, and cut back on commercials. In other words... slim down and cut the fat like every business in the world has to do.

Even their pay-per-view or “on demand”, why would I pay $5 to watch a movie instantly on cable, when I can pay $9 a month to Netflix and watch 3,000 movies on demand if I want to?

If cable companies continue to interrupt and limit streaming video, like some are, they will put themselves completely out of business, as someone will come along, maybe even Netflix, and offer Netflix plus broadband internet for a reasonable price.

Let free market dictate the winning and losing cable channels, stop bundling 150 channels of crud with 2 channels that are worthwhile.


77 posted on 06/15/2011 2:45:18 PM PDT by esoxmagnum
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To: Melas

Oh, and what’s behind a DSLAM is usually fiber.


78 posted on 06/15/2011 2:45:21 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Hawk)
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To: antiRepublicrat

——————God forbid the ISP has to build out its infrastructure more to accommodate the information the ISP’s paying customers request.-—————

These people are as dirty as h*#l.

Isn’t something like 90% of the nation’s fiber still dark?(left unused, unlit)

(I forget the proper lingo)


79 posted on 06/15/2011 2:47:21 PM PDT by Halfmanhalfamazing ( The liberal media is more ideologically pure than Barack Obama)
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To: Halfmanhalfamazing

Now think back in early American history, before the Revolutionary war. Even though there was a postal system, the Founding Fathers could not trust it to convey their correspondence. They used their own trusted couriers to stay connected.

THAT’S WHY universal service is so dangerous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Committee_of_correspondence
The Committees of Correspondence were shadow governments organized by the Patriot leaders of the Thirteen Colonies on the eve of American Revolution. They coordinated responses to Britain and shared their plans; by 1773 they had emerged as shadow governments, superseding the colonial legislature and royal officials.


80 posted on 06/15/2011 2:49:46 PM PDT by abb
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To: abb

When they say “universal”, what I hear is “progressivism”. Socialism.

You will! Or else.


81 posted on 06/15/2011 2:50:56 PM PDT by Halfmanhalfamazing ( The liberal media is more ideologically pure than Barack Obama)
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To: sportutegrl
I am sick of HBO's R and X rated filth, left wing documentaries and propaganda movies.

HBO is a premium channel that requires a subscription. If you don't like it, then by all means don't subscribe.

Netflix shows a lot of Christian and family friendly stuff that I didn't know existed. I have often wondered what TV would look like if people could pick what shows they get, and Netflix is showing us that. I predict that eventually this will be driving more family friendly movies and other programming since HBO and Comcast aren't making the decisions anymore.

The irony and misinformation here is incredible. Netflix has movies that HBO et al would never show uncut. Stuff that is truly X rated, not the soft core fare found on HBO.

In reality, premium channels such as HBO function a lot like Netflix these days. I pull up HBO HD on a menu, and I can watch any show that HBO is offering.

82 posted on 06/15/2011 2:54:00 PM PDT by Melas (Sent via Galaxy Tab)
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To: abb

Not just that, but the committees also served a news function.

The king controlled the on/off ramps during those days, and the founders knew full well what that meant.

That’s why they avoided it and worked to thwart it.


83 posted on 06/15/2011 2:56:19 PM PDT by Halfmanhalfamazing ( The liberal media is more ideologically pure than Barack Obama)
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To: Halfmanhalfamazing
The king controlled the on/off ramps during those days, and the founders knew full well what that meant.

Exactly. Ecclesiastes 1:9. "The thing that has been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun."

84 posted on 06/15/2011 2:59:28 PM PDT by abb
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Gotcha. I have this tendency to think of FIOS as cable, even thought FIOS regularly reminds me that it’s not. All I know is that I could never go back. I really noticed the difference at work where we had DSL. It would take forever to download large PDF files from manufacturers. Where at home, I can download entire movies or CD collections in a fraction of the time. I don’t think it took ten whole minutes for the Itunes to completely deliver the entire Beatles catalog, and most of that time was consumed with file housekeeping on my computer’s end.


85 posted on 06/15/2011 3:01:20 PM PDT by Melas (Sent via Galaxy Tab)
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To: Halfmanhalfamazing
Isn’t something like 90% of the nation’s fiber still dark?(left unused, unlit)

Fiber is cheap, but it's extremely expensive to install, so usually far more than is needed is installed while the ditches are open, creating a huge overcapacity. Dark fiber mainly refers to the overcapacity in addition to individual lines not being used. There was a fiber laying frenzy during the dotcom boom, so there's a lot of extra fiber cable around. In addition, newer technologies have vastly increased the amount of data that can be transmitted on the same fiber, essentially creating more dark fiber. I don't know about 90%, but it is significant for sure.

Anyway, I know Google's been buying up a lot of dark fiber to use within their own network. Level 3 Communications, which carries the Netflix traffic, has been buying an obscene amount of it.

86 posted on 06/15/2011 3:07:13 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: Melas
>> Netflix has movies that HBO et al would never show uncut.
>> Stuff that is truly X rated, not the soft core fare found on HBO.

Uh... no, it doesn't.

If you think I'm incorrect, can you give an example? I've never seen one listed, hence I really don't think they do.
87 posted on 06/15/2011 3:14:03 PM PDT by Mike-o-Matic
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To: abb

Net neutrality laws are already unnecessary. Having the government decide what’s “fair” always ends badly.


88 posted on 06/15/2011 3:43:24 PM PDT by discostu (Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn)
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To: abb

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=152404
Digital Drives Media Futures, Hitting $555B In 2015

http://www.amazon.com/Deal-Hell-Plundered-American-Newspapers/dp/1586487914/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1308167527&sr=8-1
The Deal from Hell: How Moguls and Wall Street Plundered Great American Newspapers


89 posted on 06/15/2011 3:44:28 PM PDT by abb
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To: AFreeBird

I agree with the sh**ty new UI. I will not cancel because of it but they will definitely here from me about it. It is extremely difficult to search for movies now.


90 posted on 06/15/2011 3:46:22 PM PDT by calex59
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To: abb

Now this is the best darn thread I’ve see in some time. I simply LOVE to read about so many who are cutting the cable. I have been off cable for 12+ years and I don’t miss it a bit. I love the comments here about being in control of the content on the screen without the constant stream of totally offensive commercials.

I have been using Netflix since it first appeared. I first got DVDs in the mail and was happy to see the on demand content arrive and expand. I agree it’s lacking in some popular content vrs cable, but they have a great selection of documentaries and educational content. I have been watching the 12 part series called “America: The Story of US and it’s wonderful. The major factor for me is; WE get to choose the content and it’s free of commercials. I connect my iPad to a DVI cable plugged into the TV, tap the Netflix App and ZOOM, full HD. The App needs a bit of work as pausing is difficult to recover from without killing and restarting the App, but it’s acceptable.

When I think of the monthly $$ we have collectively spent on cable/satellite over the past 12 years, and the massive advertising revenue that is generated for the liberals trying to destroy this country simply because OUR eyes are staring at the screen and it makes me ill.

When I see there is a trend that indicates more are turning in their boxes for the peace it brings to their home and I am delighted. I only wish we conservatives who are still paying that monthly cable bill would stand up in mass and say, take your cable and MSNBC and commercials and shove it all, making a massive statement to the liberal establishment. If I could read one thread like this per day, I might start to believe the average citizen of this country is awaking from their long slumber.

Thanks for all the great posts. (please note tag line)


91 posted on 06/15/2011 3:52:36 PM PDT by ri4dc (Cut your cable, Break Wind for the TSA, Flush Twice in 2012, ROTUS Meet the Hermanator)
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To: Notary Sojac
So you want the government to come in and regulate this? If you want to pay the full freight for your bandwidth, all you have to do is sign up for a business account. Then, you'll find out just how expensive this stuff actually is.

If a customer gets to watch all the HBO he wants for a flat rate per month, then the same deal should apply to Netflix.

Okay, but HBO doesn't rely on the networks of a 3rd party to deliver that to you.

92 posted on 06/15/2011 4:03:09 PM PDT by perfect_rovian_storm (We're stuck between Obama's policies that suck and his ineptitude that blows.)
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To: antiRepublicrat
I don't want to have a problem ordering a book from Amazon because my ISP made a deal with Barnes & Noble.

These statements always amaze me. When has this happened? Why WOULD this happen? Why would bringing in a corrupt to the core entity such as the government make this problem any better? You'll sell out the freedom of the internet in order to 'save' it. What a plan.

I think what you probably will see are bandwidth caps and plan changes. Our plans that we have now won't change in price, just the level of service. What we all pay now for access will be the cheapest plan. And then the cost of Netflix will stop being shifted and if you want it, you'll need to pay for a huge data plan to have it.

Frankly, I'd rather see it done the non-neutral way and have Netflix sit down with the ISPs and work out a deal that would save both of their business models. But that wouldn't give us the ole warm-n-fuzzies with Daddy Government saving the day, would it?

93 posted on 06/15/2011 4:15:49 PM PDT by perfect_rovian_storm (We're stuck between Obama's policies that suck and his ineptitude that blows.)
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To: Skip Ripley

Bingo!


94 posted on 06/15/2011 4:21:33 PM PDT by Emperor Palpatine (Here you are in the Ninth - two men out and two men on.)
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To: Skip Ripley

Exactly. I had Netflix for a year. There wasn’t enough content to interest me.


95 posted on 06/15/2011 4:24:40 PM PDT by Varda
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To: discostu
Having the government decide what’s “fair” always ends badly.

We're in total agreement on the above...

96 posted on 06/15/2011 4:26:12 PM PDT by GOPJ (In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act. - - Orwell)
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To: dangerdoc

Heck no, I don’t work in the cable television industry. I work in IT, but I don’t rely on overcharged services and that’s not what gets my caps key aflutter. It’s the sheer idiocy of the literal MORONS who want to bring in government regulators to solve a problem that doesn’t even really exist yet. How idiotic can one be to even suggest such a thing? Yet, they’ve got this great sales pitch and are even here on conservative sites telling us how ‘necessary’ it is and now wonderful this ‘net neutral world’ is. Barf.

If you want to see what I’m talking about, find out the specs of your internet connection and then call up your cable company and ask them for a business connection with the same specs. You’ll probably be in shock for a couple of days after hearing the price.

When they sell you a business connection, they expect you to use the connection to its full capacity, so you are charged accordingly. This is not the case with a residential connection. With a residential connection, they bank on making money by you not using your full capacity. The idea is that so few actually will that it all balances out in the end.

Then, Netflix comes along and all of a sudden the users are using a lot more of their capacity and they’re increasing every day. Something has to give somewhere. Either you’re going to have to pay more for Netflix to allow for the service to operate on your ISP, OR the entire way you pay for residential broadband access will have to change. Either way, Netflix is going to cost a lot more.

And either way, the government has ZERO place in getting involved in regulating the content of the internet. Especially in the name of ‘fairness’ or ‘neutrality’ or whatever, because the government has never in history used words like that for the force of good and sure as hell aren’t likely to start now.


97 posted on 06/15/2011 4:31:22 PM PDT by perfect_rovian_storm (We're stuck between Obama's policies that suck and his ineptitude that blows.)
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To: perfect_rovian_storm

Business always gets hosed, but it is the cost of doing business so they pay. I don’t use cable for my internet connection I use a small local company, I started with the home user plan and upgraded to the business plan to get higher speed, it was only $20/mo more and much faster.


98 posted on 06/15/2011 5:12:56 PM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: Melas
Me: Netflix shows a lot of Christian and family friendly stuff that I didn't know existed.

Your reply: The irony and misinformation here is incredible. Netflix has movies that HBO et al would never show uncut. Stuff that is truly X rated, not the soft core fare found on HBO.

I guess it is apparent what comes up on your Netflix "Suggestions for You" tab.

99 posted on 06/15/2011 5:24:00 PM PDT by sportutegrl (Netflix suggestions based on your movie preferences)
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To: abb
I had been thinking of trying out Netflix for a while, and decided to give it a try(30 day free trial)after reading this thread.

I bought a WD Live Plus media player about a month ago(along with a cheap usb wifi adapter for it)...put a movie in queue(on the PC), clicked on Netflix on the WD Live unit, entered account info....was watching the movie in less than a minute...no stutters and such off the wifi...good quality(HD)...only wish I had a decent sound system for my TV.

Pretty cool stuff...

Really getting tired of all the garbage on cable...

I also put up an antenna in the attic recently(good enough to get local news channels off the airways).

It may be time that my cable TV goes the way of my land-line phone....AKA...adios.

100 posted on 06/15/2011 5:58:29 PM PDT by RckyRaCoCo (I prefer liberty with danger to peace with slavery, IXNAY THE TSA!)
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