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Is this the end of handwriting? Indiana schools to teach keyboard skills instead
The Daily Mail UK ^ | Last updated at 6:40 AM on 7th July 2011 | By DAILY MAIL REPORTER

Posted on 07/07/2011 7:52:05 AM PDT by newzjunkey

...[Indiana] State officials sent school leaders a memo April 25 telling them that instead of cursive writing, students will be expected to become proficient in keyboard use.

The Times of Munster reports the memo says schools may continue to teach cursive as a local standard, or they may decide to stop teaching cursive altogether...

...'The skill of handwriting is a dying art,' [East Allen County Schools Superintendent Karyle Green] said. 'Everything isn’t handwritten anymore.'...

Winning: The key board wins as students will no longer be assessed on the handwriting style in third and fourth grade

From now on, second-graders will be taught cursive. But students will no longer be assessed on the handwriting style in third and fourth grade.

'We think it’s still important for kids to be able to read cursive,' Hissong said.

'But after that, it begins to become obsolete.'

Andree Anderson of the Indiana University Northwest Urban Teacher Education Program says teachers haven't had the time to teach cursive writing for some time because it's not a top priority...

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Indiana
KEYWORDS: cursive; daniels; education; handwriting
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How will this effect signatures in the next generation?
1 posted on 07/07/2011 7:52:12 AM PDT by newzjunkey
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To: newzjunkey
Signatures are like Chinese characters ~ they're intuitive.

I've been pushing on Fairfax County VA schools for years and years to at least give equal weight to keyboarding.

It is WRONG for a second grader to get a "-" for cursive when he can already TYPE 72 WPM.

This step forward should soon sweep the nation.

2 posted on 07/07/2011 7:54:53 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: newzjunkey

My twins’ 3rd grade teacher (about 15 years ago) said she didn’t have time to teach her students cursive. I was shocked! They basically taught themselves.


3 posted on 07/07/2011 7:55:48 AM PDT by ilovesarah2012
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To: newzjunkey
Hell, my penmanship ended in 1965 in radio school when I saw my printing was waaayyyy nicer than my Palmer Method.

Been print'n ever since.

4 posted on 07/07/2011 7:55:55 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: newzjunkey
I remember when I was in school, they drilled handwriting (about an hour a day) from 3rd grade through 6th grade and then its use was mandatory in most classes during Junior High and High School. When my kids went through elementary school, I was shocked, they taught handwriting in the 3rd grade for about 1/3 of the year, then moved on.
5 posted on 07/07/2011 7:59:07 AM PDT by apillar
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To: newzjunkey

Why can’t we teach kids how to do both? Sounds like a liberal teacher’s union decision.


6 posted on 07/07/2011 7:59:15 AM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: newzjunkey

I cringe at my son’s terrible handwriting, but....its just a reflex. Other than your signature, cursive means little anymore. Being able to type quickly & accurately is a much more useful skill.


7 posted on 07/07/2011 7:59:22 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: muawiyah

Last week, the judge in the Casey Anthony trial asked the young man who had caused a disturbance in the courtroom with his middle finger stunt if he could ‘read and write’.

If all we teach is ‘keyboarding’, then his answer would have been ‘no’.................


8 posted on 07/07/2011 7:59:47 AM PDT by Red Badger (Casey Anthony: "Surprise, surprise."...............)
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To: newzjunkey
Great...

Then what happens when the North Koreans attack us with their super-mega EMP bomb...manual typewriters? What are these people thinking!

9 posted on 07/07/2011 8:00:04 AM PDT by Tex-Con-Man
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To: ilovesarah2012
I don't know where cursive is taught any more. Spelling will be the next to fall - texting does not use 'correct' spelling now.

I have 5 grandchildren. The girls are more likely to use cursive.

10 posted on 07/07/2011 8:00:24 AM PDT by mathluv ( Conservative first and foremost, republican second - GO SARAHCUDA!!!!)
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To: newzjunkey

LOL. It will be in the chip in your arm.


11 posted on 07/07/2011 8:01:21 AM PDT by org.whodat
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To: newzjunkey

Other than when a signature is required, I never write longhand. A skill going the way of the buggy whip.


12 posted on 07/07/2011 8:01:25 AM PDT by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
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To: muawiyah

It turns out that one of the best classes I ever took in high school was typing. Of course a buddy of mine and I took the class because that’s where all the girls were. It payed off in the long run because I am fairly good on the keyboard.

As I grew up, I entered the electronics industry as a draftsman, then got into design. We printed everything and I continue to print everything today. I guess the main thing is “Can you communicate effectively?” Things are going to evolve, with us or without us.


13 posted on 07/07/2011 8:01:53 AM PDT by RC2
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To: rbg81

Writing means little anymore..............now you know why..............

14 posted on 07/07/2011 8:03:34 AM PDT by Red Badger (Casey Anthony: "Surprise, surprise."...............)
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To: apillar

I put up with cursive writing in Elementary and middle school.(At that level everything was required to be in cursive) I pitty my poor teachers trying to decipher my hen scratch.

After I hit high school, and realized the teachers did not care, I went back to printing and never looked back.


15 posted on 07/07/2011 8:04:29 AM PDT by Nashvegas (What do you get if you offer a liberal a penny for their thoughts? Change)
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To: RC2
As I grew up, I entered the electronics industry as a draftsman, then got into design. We printed everything and I continue to print everything today.

Same with me. I 'print' faster than I can write....................

16 posted on 07/07/2011 8:04:48 AM PDT by Red Badger (Casey Anthony: "Surprise, surprise."...............)
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To: rbg81

I think it is a myth that peoples’ cursive was better “in the olden days”. Whenever I see a letter from, say 50-200 years ago I can’t make heads nor tails of it. I don’t see how anyone can. Maybe they should teach cursive READING.


17 posted on 07/07/2011 8:06:19 AM PDT by DManA
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To: newzjunkey

I take every computer class I can, but my non-existent keyboard skills really hold me back. The other mostly much younger folk in these classes tend to type very fast. I do wonder if we are gonna regret if we lose the whole culture of handwriting.


18 posted on 07/07/2011 8:07:10 AM PDT by Calusa (The pump don't work cause the vandals took the handles. Quoth Bob Dylan.)
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To: Red Badger

I understand what you’re trying to say, but disagree. If you have no honor or morals, the quality of your signature means almost nothing anyway. Its the person, not his/her signature that counts.


19 posted on 07/07/2011 8:08:37 AM PDT by rbg81
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To: newzjunkey

Probably not by much. Signatures are going electronic now.

Failing that, spending an entire semester on cursive is useless. Nobody writes an entire paper in longhand cursive any more.

Teaching enough cursive to make a signature takes all of two weeks. Be done with it, move on to an actual usable and marketable skill.


20 posted on 07/07/2011 8:12:35 AM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: RC2

I learned how to type in the 60s with a record and workbook that came with my dad’s portable typewriter. It was fun. I had no idea how many man years I was to end up spending on a keyboard.

I have been able to touch type numbers though. I have to stop and look if I type a number.


21 posted on 07/07/2011 8:12:46 AM PDT by DManA
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To: rbg81

” the quality of your signature means almost nothing anyway. Its the person, not his/her signature that counts “

There are a couple of situations where I have to place my ‘signature’ on a screen with a stylus - it looks nothing like my ‘pen&paper” signature, but is still, somehow, valid....


22 posted on 07/07/2011 8:13:04 AM PDT by Uncle Ike (Rope is cheap, and there are lots of trees...)
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To: newzjunkey

This is so totally wrong! How will they ever sign their welfare checks? Oh, wait - direct deposit. Never mind.


23 posted on 07/07/2011 8:13:20 AM PDT by SkyDancer (You know they invented wheelbarrows to teach FAA inspectors to walk on their hind legs.)
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To: rbg81

MY Grandfather was illiterate. He could neither read nor write. He was a cotton/ corn /sharecropper farmer in the early 20th century.

All he could do was make an ‘X’ by his name to sign checks and documents. Do you want to go back to those days?...................


24 posted on 07/07/2011 8:13:29 AM PDT by Red Badger (Casey Anthony: "Surprise, surprise."...............)
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To: newzjunkey

My handwriting was always terrible. It’s one of the reasons I was an early adopter of PCs. Thank goodness for that semester of typing in high school.


25 posted on 07/07/2011 8:14:35 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum ("A society of sheep must in time beget a government of wolves." - Bertrand de Jouvenel des Ursins)
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To: Kirkwood

Why can’t we teach kids how to do both? Sounds like a liberal teacher’s union decision.

<><><><><

It’s 2011, Kirkwood. When in the real world will they use cursive?


26 posted on 07/07/2011 8:14:55 AM PDT by dmz
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To: Calusa

That’s what printing is for. Cursive is mostly useless and slow.


27 posted on 07/07/2011 8:15:29 AM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: Red Badger

Psst- signet rings.


28 posted on 07/07/2011 8:16:05 AM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: newzjunkey

I remember all those hours spent learning to write in cursive back in the 2nd and 3rd grades - now my signature is an illegible scrawl worthy of a doctor’s prescription form. I can’t remember the last time I needed to write anything in cursive. I think as long as people are able to print by hand well enough to, say, fill in bank deposit slips and are also proficient at typing on a keyboard or a smartphone, they’re fine.


29 posted on 07/07/2011 8:16:05 AM PDT by AnotherUnixGeek
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To: newzjunkey
The school where my wife teaches grades handwriting through 5th grade. While typing is a good skill to have, it can be learned simultaneously with handwriting.

Handwriting can contribute to fine motor skill development, which is important for kids as they grow. This article also suggests that the brain is boosted by learning the skill:

How Handwriting Boosts the Brain (Wall St. Journal Online)

30 posted on 07/07/2011 8:17:24 AM PDT by Crolis ("To have a right to do a thing is not at all the same as to be right in doing it." -GKC)
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To: newzjunkey

Look on the bright side. Someday notes written in cursive can be used as coded messages in the next revolution.


31 posted on 07/07/2011 8:17:40 AM PDT by Truth is a Weapon (Truth, it hurts so good.)
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To: Red Badger

The best part is......people can read what I write.


32 posted on 07/07/2011 8:19:25 AM PDT by RC2
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To: newzjunkey

Thankfully, my own kids have already learned to write in cursive, and although the oldest’s handwriting would have sent the teachers I had in school into an insane asylum, the youngest’s is just fine.

However, given this current trend, it does look as though I’ll have to teach my grandchildren how to write properly myself — in the Palmer method.

I know that many here on FR applaud this move by the schools, but I have to say...I’ve watched my above-mentioned highschooler attempt to study using the notes he’s taken in class. His handwriting is so poor that I’ve had to force him to re-write entire chapters so that it is legible (to him AND to me). IMO, you can’t study properly when your notes are chaotic. It’s a shame that the kids’ teachers didn’t come down harder on poor handwriting when they were younger. After all, they aren’t taking class notes with a keyboard...

Regards,

PS: I can rest assured that my little guy will continue to have excellent handwriting, as he is now homeschooled.

PPS: BTW, I agree that typing should also be taught in school. I don’t understand why they can’t do both.


33 posted on 07/07/2011 8:22:28 AM PDT by VermiciousKnid (Sic narro nos totus!)
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To: ilovesarah2012
I don't understand how there isn't time to teach cursive now.

I learned in 2nd grade. It didn't take long at all. What's crowded it out? From test scores, it certainly doesn't appear to be reading, English language skill, math or other fundamentals.

I've been touch-typing for decades. I rarely write longhand now but still practice penmanship to keep the skill.

34 posted on 07/07/2011 8:23:03 AM PDT by newzjunkey
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To: RC2

Good for you. However, I have tried to read some of the prose created on keyboards and still cannot for the life of me decipher any meaning from the words written. If all the efforts of teaching cursive were shifted toward spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction it would be a net plus for humanity. But from what I observe of writing skills coming from public school graduates that does not appear to be the case.


35 posted on 07/07/2011 8:23:16 AM PDT by Truth is a Weapon (Truth, it hurts so good.)
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To: newzjunkey
I still write letters by hand, with a fountain pen. The e-mails I sent my sons while they were away at college are already gone, but they still have my letters.

I know, and use, Morse Code, too. Sign me up for the Counter-revolution. :)

36 posted on 07/07/2011 8:24:21 AM PDT by TonyInOhio (H-O-L-D F-A-S-T)
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To: newzjunkey

I recall cursive, or “real writing”, being a subject taught for an hour or less for part of only one year. I think it was third grade. All this year-after-year teaching of cursive sounds more like penmanship, or some effort to turn all kids into stylish scribblers.

Teach it for a few months and be done with it. It’ll still prove more useful than much of the PC drivel being injected into too many school curricula.


37 posted on 07/07/2011 8:24:51 AM PDT by Will88
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To: Will88

Which brings up the question: will the printing form of handwriting still be taught, which always preceded cursive instruction? Should kids be taught to write by hand in any form?


38 posted on 07/07/2011 8:26:48 AM PDT by Will88
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To: newzjunkey

In Russia children are taught cursive first. My Ukrainian wife thinks it is wrong for us to have children printing block letters in the early grades rather than really writing.


39 posted on 07/07/2011 8:27:18 AM PDT by Monterrosa-24 (...even more American than a French bikini and a Russian AK-47.)
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To: Crolis

Thanks for that link. Fine motor skill is one reason I continue to practice handwriting.


40 posted on 07/07/2011 8:30:37 AM PDT by newzjunkey
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To: muawiyah
I've been pushing on Fairfax County VA schools for years and years to at least give equal weight to keyboarding.

They seem to do that here in Accomack County. One of the application requirements for Governor's school is that all three essays must be in the student's own handwriting. That drove my daughter up the wall, especially considering one of the required essays was about computer skills!

41 posted on 07/07/2011 8:33:35 AM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: newzjunkey

Good grief. Teach both. The kids can handle it, there’s a use for both, and different skills are learned by being taught both. My sixth-grader made an easy transition from printing to cursive, and most of his keyboarding skills were picked up on his own.


42 posted on 07/07/2011 8:34:47 AM PDT by Southside_Chicago_Republican ("It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged." -- G.K. Chesterton)
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To: Kirkwood
It's more like a Conservative's position ~ we've moved on into a high tech world where the keyboard and controller are "the thing". Time to quit wasting student's time and taxpayer's dollars forcing a practice on people who have hereditary "writer's cramp".

Like I said it's just wrong to abuse children with a bad grade for performance in an antiquated practice.

43 posted on 07/07/2011 8:36:17 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Spktyr

Freemason?.............


44 posted on 07/07/2011 8:38:21 AM PDT by Red Badger (Casey Anthony: "Surprise, surprise."...............)
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To: newzjunkey
There are quite a few ancillary effects. Precise hand and finger control has many side benefits. Modeling, playing musical instruments, drawing, etc. Cultivating the ability at an early age is good.

What the schools should do, instead of adopting an either-or approach, is push touch typing into the required part of the curriculum.

45 posted on 07/07/2011 8:39:35 AM PDT by Cboldt
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To: Tex-Con-Man

Printing is next, after the super emp bomb. In the meantime keep your laptop safe with acceptable shielding http://i568.photobucket.com/albums/ss125/Varus_Torvyn/aluminumprofessor.jpg


46 posted on 07/07/2011 8:39:46 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: VermiciousKnid
Look, I took my notes in college in Latin just for practice. I can still read them ~ thankfully I printed each and every word exactly the way the Romans did it.

Cursive came much later and was not, in my estimation, any sort of improvement.

47 posted on 07/07/2011 8:43:21 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Red Badger

Nope. Signet rings are what people used to use to sign documents.

Cursive being used as a signature is a relatively recent development and appears that it might be short lived.


48 posted on 07/07/2011 8:44:36 AM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: Southside_Chicago_Republican

Aside from a signature, what use is there in the adult world for cursive these days?


49 posted on 07/07/2011 8:45:44 AM PDT by Spktyr (Overwhelmingly superior firepower and the willingness to use it is the only proven peace solution.)
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To: newzjunkey

Well, if daily use by the average adult is the new metric for what we teach in schools, we oughta be done with the kids by about the 5th grade.


50 posted on 07/07/2011 8:46:52 AM PDT by chrisser (Starve the Monkeys!)
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