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Nuclear Plant Near Epicenter Shuts Down
NBC Washingwon ^

Posted on 08/23/2011 12:42:13 PM PDT by matt04

A nuclear power plant located in Louisa County, the epicenter of the earthquake in Virginia, has shut down.

The North Anna Power Station, operated by Dominion Power, has two reactors. The plant declared an "unusual event" in the wake of the 5.9 magnitude quake, which is the lowest stage on the plant's emergency scale.

As a result, the plant has been shut down.

The AP reports the plant is being run off of four emergency diesel generators, which are supplying power for critical safety equipment.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokesman Roger Hannah says the agency was not immediately aware of any damage at nuclear power plants in the southeast.

(Excerpt) Read more at nbcwashington.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: blackout; dominion; earthquake; fallout; leak; meltdown; northanna; nuclear; pillage; radiation; rape; zombies
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To: Buckhead
They had a similar problem in Japan. When running on just 3 generators, it could mean that current generation may not be optimal. In Japan that caused some spent fuel pools to overheat. And the busy Japanese workers missed the overheating. At any rate - there are now reports of 14 nuclear plants that have reported unusual events (lowest level of concern).

No other power reactors shut automatically, or scrammed, said Diane Screnci, another NRC spokeswoman. Fourteen other nuclear plants declared a Notification of Unusual Event, but remained in operation, she said. These are:

--Carolina Power & Light's Shearon Harris-1, North Hill, North Carolina
--Constellation's Calvert Cliffs-1 and -2, Lusby, Maryland
--Dominion Power's Surry-1 and -2, Surry, Virginia
--Entergy's Palisades, Covert, Michigan
--Exelon's Oyster Creek-1, Forked River, New Jersey
--Exelon's Limerick-1, Limerick, Pennsylvania
--Exelon's Peach Bottom-1 and -2, Delta, Pennsylvania
--Exelon's Three Mile Island-1, Middletown, Pennsylvania
--Exelon's Oyster Creek-1, Forked River, New Jersey
--Exelon's Limerick-1, Limerick, Pennyslvania
--PPL's Susquehanna-1 and -2 Salem Township, Pennsylvania
--PSEG's Salem-1 and -2, and Hope Creek-1 and -2, Hancocks Bridge, New Jersey
--Indiana Michigan Power's Donald C. Cook-1 and 2, Bridgman, Michigan

Earthquake of 5.8 magnitude shuts North Anna nuke plants

51 posted on 08/23/2011 3:10:33 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: SoldierDad

Yes. By the media. For the plant, it was a builtin failsafe: “Both reactors tripped automatically at the time of the quake and shut down.” Even the article says so.


52 posted on 08/23/2011 3:19:33 PM PDT by Moose Burger
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To: blam

Automatic shutdown procedure. NO need for a helicopter


53 posted on 08/23/2011 3:28:00 PM PDT by Christian Engineer Mass (25ish Cambridge MA grad student. Many conservative Christians my age out there? __ Click my name)
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To: matt04

Meanwhile the cops are probably out rounding up guns door-to-door, “Just to be safe.”


54 posted on 08/23/2011 3:34:58 PM PDT by ElkGroveDan (My tagline is in the shop.)
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To: Buckhead

I would assume that they have redundancy built into the system, where when the power goes out all the generators start up even thou they don’t need all four. That way if one does fail, their is no delay until the next one comes online. Also they must account for the fact that at some point they must take one off line at a time to change the oil, filters, etc.


55 posted on 08/23/2011 3:43:09 PM PDT by matt04
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To: matt04

Lenny Bruce is not afraid.


56 posted on 08/23/2011 3:59:51 PM PDT by IamCenny
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To: mad_as_he$$

No. They’re both Westinghouse 4 loop PWRs.


57 posted on 08/23/2011 4:43:43 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: wolfpat

Better! Thanks. Last report I heard all was going well on the shutdown of at least four plants.


58 posted on 08/23/2011 4:45:00 PM PDT by mad_as_he$$
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To: Buckhead

They are not running 4 generators because they need 4 generators. They’re running 4 generators because the procedure says to run 4 generators. They only need one per reactor, and I’d bet they have a way of cross connecting them to only really need 1 for both. Even if off site power is restored, the procedure probably still calls for them to run. Once off site power is restored, they won’t need them at all.


59 posted on 08/23/2011 4:48:24 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: SoldierDad

On whose part? Frankly, they did the right thing by shutting down and going to the DG’s. They lost offsite power, meaning even though they were up, there was no way of knowing for how long they’d be able to STAY up. Best to place the plant in a safe condition and go with what you know.


60 posted on 08/23/2011 4:55:11 PM PDT by OCCASparky (Steely-eyed killer of the deep.)
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To: mad_as_he$$

It’s not that big of a deal. This earthquake was way below the limit for what these plants were designed to withstand without damage.

They’ll send a bunch of “Scratch Plates” off to an engineering company to be evaluated for the exact intensity of this quake. That’ll determine if they can start back up. These scratch plates are tuned to different frequencies and set to vibrate each of the three orthogonal planes. They’ll show how strong the vibrations were at what frequency and in what direction.


61 posted on 08/23/2011 4:55:31 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: SoldierDad
I certainly hope the reactor was built to withstand a much stronger magnitude quake than a 5.9

They are. Design basis, IIRC, is for at least a 7.0 centered within 5 miles of the plant.
62 posted on 08/23/2011 4:56:26 PM PDT by OCCASparky (Steely-eyed killer of the deep.)
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To: SoldierDad

A core-trip is usually automatic in cases such as this.


63 posted on 08/23/2011 4:58:40 PM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: Dead Corpse
Does it make anyone else nervous when there are "unusual events" at nuclear power plants? I live about 10 miles from Monticello in Minnesota.

Look at what it takes to declare an unusual event and there are lots and lots of things that have nothing to do with nuclear power that can cause that to occur. I'll be willing to bet that St. Lucie or some other southern plants will probably be declaring UE's based solely on wind come this weekend.
64 posted on 08/23/2011 4:59:00 PM PDT by OCCASparky (Steely-eyed killer of the deep.)
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To: mad_as_he$$

Nope—North Anna is a dual-unit PWR.


65 posted on 08/23/2011 4:59:57 PM PDT by OCCASparky (Steely-eyed killer of the deep.)
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To: wolfpat

True, wolfpat. The safety system has redundant “trains”, one of which has the lion’s share of safety-related equipment running. To ensure protection of the decay heat removal and spent fuel cooling systems, only one DG need be functional.


66 posted on 08/23/2011 5:02:38 PM PDT by OCCASparky (Steely-eyed killer of the deep.)
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To: wolfpat
I understand. I lived in Kalifornia for many years. Saw the aftermath of all the big quakes. I have seen a great deal of damage from relatively small quakes that had more side to side motion than was anticipated. The scale measures energy released but the vertical and horizontal movement can be very different in the resulting damage. I was in a Semiconductor facility during one quake in Livermore and watched a 30,000 pound machine break all of it's anchors and literally hop across the floor. It's sister machine than was 180 degrees out the other direction never even moved or stressed than anchors.

The natural frequency components of various structures is very interesting

67 posted on 08/23/2011 5:12:02 PM PDT by mad_as_he$$
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To: wolfpat
This earthquake was way below the limit for what these plants were designed to withstand without damage.

Not what I have read. The quake was right at the maximum this plant was designed for. Plant was designed for 5.9 to 6.2. This was the strongest quake recorded in that area during the modern nuclear power plant era. So there must be at least some damage. Dominion itself states that these plants are built to the local requirements. And they have plants scattered around the east and mid-west.

68 posted on 08/23/2011 5:43:00 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: Buckhead

Each unit has two redundant safety trains, i.e. duplicate of everything they need to either shut the plant down safely and/or maintain core temperature. Each safety train has one generator, which by design, is all they need to maintain that unit. Running both trains at the outset of an emergency is likely standard EOP. Loss of one genset does not mean they have inadequate generating capacity. Additionally, they most likey can cross-tie emergency electrical busses across both units, resulting in the availability of 3 gensets, where only two are needed by design for both units. Essentially, they are still up one genset, instead of down one as you imply. 22 years in Nuclear Generation.


69 posted on 08/23/2011 6:09:57 PM PDT by DKM
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To: justa-hairyape

6.2 is the “Safe Shutdown Earthquake”.

The “Design basis Earthquake” is probably around 7 point something. I’ve been out of the industry for 6 years, and I forget the exact numbers.

No, there doesn’t “have to be some damage”.


70 posted on 08/23/2011 6:11:50 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: wolfpat

Wolfpat - exactly. Left the business in 2002 after 22 years.


71 posted on 08/23/2011 6:13:44 PM PDT by DKM
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To: DKM

I was fired in 2004, after 24 in the business.


72 posted on 08/23/2011 6:40:15 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: DKM

I just realized I’ve been out for 7 years. My how time flies.


73 posted on 08/23/2011 6:41:50 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: SoldierDad

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission headquarters in Rockville, Md., is monitoring an Alert at the North Anna nuclear power plant in Virginia, following today’s earthquake in central Virginia. The NRC is also monitoring Unusual Events, the lowest emergency classification, declared at several other Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants. In accordance with agency procedures, the NRC’s regional offices in King of Prussia, Pa., and Atlanta have activated their incident response centers. NRC resident inspectors at the affected nuclear power plants will continue to monitor conditions for the duration of the event. North Anna declared its Alert, the second-lowest of the NRC’s four emergency classifications, when the plant lost electricity from the grid following the quake just before 2 p.m. Tuesday. Power is being provided by onsite diesel generators and the plant’s safety systems are operating normally. Plant personnel and NRC resident inspectors are continuing to examine plant conditions. NRC staff in the Maryland headquarters felt the quake and immediately began checking with U.S. nuclear power plants. The NRC is in direct communications with North Anna and is coordinating its response with other federal agencies. Nuclear power plants are built to withstand environmental hazards, including earthquakes. Even those plants that are located outside of areas with extensive seismic activity are designed for safety in the event of such a natural disaster. The NRC requires that safety significant structures, systems, and components be designed to take into account the most severe natural phenomena historically reported for the site and surrounding area. Plants declaring Unusual Events, which indicate a potential decrease in plant safety, include Peach Bottom, Three Mile Island, Susquehanna and Limerick in Pennsylvania; Salem, Hope Creek and Oyster Creek in New Jersey, Calvert Cliffs in Maryland, Surry in Virginia, Shearon Harris in North Carolina and D.C. Cook and Palisades in Michigan. All these plants continue to operate while plant personnel examine their sites.

ref: http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/news/2011/11-153.pdf


74 posted on 08/23/2011 7:14:29 PM PDT by sefarkas (Why vote Democrat Lite?)
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To: SoldierDad

*groan*


75 posted on 08/23/2011 7:18:08 PM PDT by null and void (Day 942 of America's holiday from reality...)
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To: SoldierDad
Dominion Virginia Power shut down its two North Anna reactors as a result of the earthquake, according to the the company.

The earthquake was felt at the North Anna Power Station and the reactor operators, following procedures, shut down the reactors," said company spokesman Jim Norvelle. "It was a manual shutdown."

The plant declared an alert, the second lowest level of emergency declaration, a commission spokesman said.

About what you’d expect. Virginia was at the epicenter of the quake.

Dominion Virginia Power's Surry Power Station is operating as normal, he said.

Also about right. Power was knocked out at North Anna – it has diesel generators to keep things running - but retained at Surrey.

How about Limerick in Pennsylvania?

“The earthquake was felt, but it didn’t jeopardize the safe operation of the plant. Both units are 100 percent and are online,” Szafran said in a phone interview just before 3 p.m. Tuesday.

“For this type of event, we have procedures in place, including a walk-down of all structures.” No evacuation was necessary, he said.

Indian Point in New York?

Indian Point Nuclear Power Plants have begun “Abnormal Operating Procedures,” according to Entergy Spokesman Jim Steets, after Tuesday afternoon's 5.9 magnitude earthquake. Abnormal Operating Procedures, or AOP, mean that the plant is being inspected for damage, although none has yet been found.

Calvert Cliffs in Maryland?

The Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant in Maryland, the closest nuclear plant to Washington, D.C., remained stable at 100% of capacity, a spokesman for Constellation Energy Nuclear Group LLC said Tuesday.

Constellation declared an "unusual event" at the plant, said Constellation spokesman Mark Sullivan.

This story mentions two more.

Mr. Sullivan said the company's nuclear plants in Scriba, N.Y., and Ontario, N.Y., were performing similar examinations although neither plant registered abnormal seismic activity.

These would be Nine Mile Point and R.E. Ginna.

Now, of course, we understand that Fukushima Daiichi in Japan was hit by an earthquake, though it may turn out that it was the tsunami following the earthquake that was the determinative event. No American plant is vulnerable to tsunami and this wasn’t the kind of earthquake that could generate a tsunami.

Regardless of all this, it makes sense that the very fact of an earthquake set reporters to asking about the local nuclear facilities. By and large, reporters have been responsible, calling over to the plants – when the lines were open – and finding out what’s what.

And what’s what? The plant nearest the epicenter closed down – though mostly due to loss of external power - and most of the others (all of the others I found information about) are puttering right along, checking around the plants for any damage but mostly unaffected.



ref: http://neinuclearnotes.blogspot.com/
76 posted on 08/23/2011 7:19:38 PM PDT by sefarkas (Why vote Democrat Lite?)
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To: AndyJackson
Actually it is not sensible.

The power grid is a superior source of reliable electric power in comparison to on-site sources. The power grid has any number of generators as well as switching equipment to maintain power to the loads. A single nuclear plant running at full power will only draw about 50MWe from the power grid, mostly to run pumps. The load is less at shutdown. The power-grids can easily handle a single nuclear site electric power load. Most nuclear plants have two circuits coming into the station and one going out (for each reactor/turbine pair). The three circuits are fairly independent. A nuclear power plant pushing 800MWe to 1200MWe out to the power grid has to be connected to that power grid -- you cannot sit and spin a turbine at full power with no load, or even partial power for that matter. The circuits coming in from off-site are connected to the same AC bus that the on-site DG is connected to, so that if the off-site circuit trips, the DG picks up that load. Two safety-systems in the nuclear plant; thus, two DGs. Either safety-system is sufficient. Safety-systems are meant to be independent to avoid common-cause failures, so cross-connecting is physically possible, but rarely done.
77 posted on 08/23/2011 7:35:32 PM PDT by sefarkas (Why vote Democrat Lite?)
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To: sefarkas

That is about what you would expect for a 5.8-5.9 . Only the reactors close to the epicenter would experience significant damage. North Anna lost external power due to damage from the earthquake. Unless of course someone just panicked and turned a switch off during the quake :>


78 posted on 08/23/2011 7:39:26 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: Buckhead
This website linked below is a little bit on the fringe, but they have put together some interesting points in their article. Just posting it for discussion purpose.

Media Silent On Fate Of North Anna Nuclear Plant At Epicenter Of 5.9 Mineral Virginia Earthquake

79 posted on 08/23/2011 7:50:12 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: justa-hairyape

You link was blocked for phishing when I clicked.


80 posted on 08/23/2011 7:56:06 PM PDT by Domestic Church (AMDG...)
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To: matt04

“The AP reports the plant is being run off of four emergency diesel generators, which are supplying power for critical safety equipment.”

WHAT? The Enviro-Weenies are gonna be all over THIS! Using Fossil Fuels to cover for a Nuclear Plant shut-down?

Heads. Will. Explode.

Oh. Wait. Never mind...


81 posted on 08/23/2011 8:08:27 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'Hobbies.' I'm developing a robust Post-Apocalyptic skill set...)
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To: Domestic Church
Sorry about that. It tried to bring up a popup that Firefox blocked. The blog cites a report from Alexander Higgans. He broke some good info during the Japan meltdowns, but he also jumped the gun on a few items. But anyone on the leading edge who bats 50 % is doing fairly good. Below is another article from him. The CNN embedded video is interesting. The quake did not trip the reactors. The loss of power tripped the reactor shutdown and control rod insertion. Also, they claim that power has returned to the plant switchboard and they are working on getting it into the plant again. They have 3 days of fuel on site for the 3 of 4 generators that are working.

Backup Generator Cooling Nuclear Power Plant Shutdown By Virginia Quake Fails

82 posted on 08/23/2011 8:09:21 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: matt04

83 posted on 08/23/2011 8:09:50 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'Hobbies.' I'm developing a robust Post-Apocalyptic skill set...)
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To: Dead Corpse

There is nothing to fear with a report of an Unusual event. It’s just what it sounds like, an event that doesn’t normally happen. The NRC wants records kept of everything and to have them and the public informed of any things “out of the normally expected parameters.”

Things like tornado warnings within 10 miles of a nuclear power plant can activate an “unusual event” notification.

Here is a little guide to think about....if you were exposed to 400 Rems or more of radiation, you would be facing possible death. In a typical year you will recieve from the sun and background radiation about .003 Rem. Occupational Nuclear Power Plant workers are only allowed to recieve a maximum of 5 Rem per year.

Exel Energy is an outstanding company and I’m sure that the Monticello plant is in excellent hands. That being said, with the above guide you should be able to judge, based on accurate reporting, that if an accident were to happen, what your potential dangers were.

Hope that helps.

P.S. I work in the Nuclear power industry. I have for over 25 years and I haven’t gone over 5 Rem total in my lifetime. Nuclear plant workers are actually quite concerned about not just protecting themselves but their surrounding communities, which contains their families. If you have any questions, I’m sure Monticello has a place where you can contact people with your concerns.


84 posted on 08/23/2011 8:27:29 PM PDT by ScubieNuc
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To: sefarkas

Have you heard anything about Millstone or Vermont Yankee? I know tremors were felt up that far north.


85 posted on 08/23/2011 8:31:36 PM PDT by matt04
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To: ScubieNuc
The North Anna Plant is at Alert Level 2. The other 9 or more plants are at Unusual Event Level 1.

NRC is Monitoring North Anna and other Nuclear Plants on East Coast Following the Earthquake

86 posted on 08/23/2011 8:39:47 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: Dead Corpse

Oops, correction to my last post....NOT .003 Rem but .3 Rem. The point was that you are exposed to radiation on a daily basis, but it is very small. Radiation at a nuclear power plant is higher but extensively monitored to not only protect the surrounding communities but the workers themselves.

A couple of the problems I had with the Japanese disaster was threefold:
1) Many in the press are ignorant about even the basics of Nuclear power/energy, therefore bad or misleading reporting
2) There are many different labels for measuring Radiation (Rems, Grays, Roentgen, Sieverts, etc.) that it gets confusing. http://www.stevequayle.com/ARAN/rad.conversion.html
3) Most of the public doesn’t have a basic understanding of nuclear power.


87 posted on 08/23/2011 8:45:02 PM PDT by ScubieNuc
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To: DKM

How big are those generators? I have heard the press talk about them, both in this case and earlier in the year when one was surrounded by the flooded Mississippi river.


88 posted on 08/23/2011 8:47:09 PM PDT by matt04
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To: justa-hairyape

A couple of things to keep in mind...

One, if the NRC thinks for an instant that a power plant is trying to hide something, they will “rip them a new one” through inspections and/or fines. Therefore, plants will generally report things that may not be a problem, but may lead to a problem or not reporting the event may be percieved as “hiding a problem”.

So, when the Emergency Guidelines for the plant say something like, “An earthquake felt in plant with significant magnitude for SUSPECTED structural or equipment damage, then issue an Alert” you can bet they will issue an Alert, EVEN if there is no immediate signs of structual or equipment damage. (BTW, the difference between calling an Unusual event and an Alert is the “suspected damage aspect”.)

The NRC likes to see plants operating with that kind of mindset. The plants that issued their alerts or unusual events have procedures and guidelines to check that everything is good and to get back on line.

As a side note, this is more notification then what you get from other large industrial plants which could pose a risk to its workers and surrounding communities. When the coal plant next door has an over pressure condition in one of it’s boilers, you never hear about it, but in a Nuclear power plant you will.


89 posted on 08/23/2011 9:03:27 PM PDT by ScubieNuc
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To: justa-hairyape

One other thing I forgot to mention, operational power plants usually have an NRC representative on site, so they are technically always under observation. There are also NRC monitoring control rooms in which plants report their status to. So being “observed by the NRC” isn’t something out of the ordinary. It’s something that is done on a constant basis.


90 posted on 08/23/2011 9:06:27 PM PDT by ScubieNuc
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To: ScubieNuc

The alert was issued due to loss of external power. That was a fairly obvious problem.


91 posted on 08/23/2011 9:46:14 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: sefarkas
The power grid is a superior source of reliable electric power

Apparently not. And you are preaching to an ex Navy nuclear submarine officer by the way.

92 posted on 08/23/2011 10:18:35 PM PDT by AndyJackson
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To: justa-hairyape

I don’t know exactly how the plant in questions set up is but I can guess based on the plants I’ve been to.

The normal source of power is the grid.
The next source of electrical power would be Diesel generators.
The next would be battery banks with alternators.

Any number of things can trigger an unusual event or alert. If one of the back up generators failed to auto start, that could be reason enough. If one of the back up generators fuel supply was compromised below a prestated amount, that could cause an alert. If a normally opperation breaker, which supplies power from the grid fails to close or open properly, that could cause an alert issue. I’m serious that there could be literally hundreds of possible sinarios in which “Normal operational parameters” were not met and the NRC had to be notified.

Should a person be aware of what’s going on? Absolutely.
Should a person be scared right now? NOT at all.

Let me go back to the Radiation limits as an example. Doctors don’t really see any changes in people until around 25 Rem (some changes in the blood count). It’s not until around 400 Rem that death is possible. So with that as a guide line the NRC (formerly the AEC) said that they didn’t want workers to get anything even close to 25 Rem, so they set 5 Rem as a limit. Plants then set their local limits as less then 5 Rem (usually 4 Rem) so that they didn’t run the risk of even getting close to the NRC’s limit.

The same is true with every other aspect of Nuclear power. If the NRC says you need two backup sources, plants will have 4 or more just to fail on the safe side of things. And it isn’t just making sure they have 4 Emergency Diesel Generators, but enough fuel to run each one for enough time to get more fuel sent from an outside source. Most plants have reserves of fuel to last for days without outside assistance. That also goes for spare parts for Emergency sources. Those things are already bought and stored in warehouses.

I’m not saying that anyone should just automatically trust completely what a plant is putting out, but realize that they too are interested in staying safe for their health and safety as well as the surrounding communities. Besides that there are hefty fines and possible imprisionment for creating or covering up a release of dangerous radioactivity.

I would say trust, but verify, and also realize that the people that work at these plants have the same or greater concerns for their lives as those people who live around the power plants. Panic and unjustified fear is not justified here at this point. IF the plant starts calling for evacuation from around the plants, THEN be concerned, but realize again, if the limit is 500 DAC/hour then the danger is going to be around 1000 DAC/hour and the evacuation will be called at 50 DAC/hour.

(DAC=Derived Air Concentration, which is essentially saying if you breath in 1 DAC of something for 2000 hours {about 1 year of work} you could receive an internal dose of 5 Rem.)


93 posted on 08/23/2011 10:25:44 PM PDT by ScubieNuc
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To: ScubieNuc
Good news. External power is restored. They also had activated a 5th backup generator at the plant to replace the one that was down with problems. PS - You can get to this Wall Street Journal article once without a subscription.

Nuclear Plant's Full Power Restored

94 posted on 08/23/2011 10:39:03 PM PDT by justa-hairyape
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To: SoldierDad
Over-reaction?

No, an appropriate precaution, assuming the plant was designed to the worst-case earthquake environment for the area, which might have been a 7.0. A 5.9 EQ would have a a chance of being a foreshock to be followed by a 7.0-7.5 EQ near the plant design limits. If you look at the Japan EQ, there were 7.0 level foreshocks that should have led the Fukushima Daiichi ower plant to be fully shut down as a precaution. Would not have prevented all that ultimately happened, but some.

I would not be surprised if the cautionary protocols at US nuke plants has been tightened accordingly. Better to have your pizzas thaw a bit than having to deal with the irrational radiation panics that the media lived on for a good while after the Japan EQ.

95 posted on 08/23/2011 11:39:20 PM PDT by SFConservative
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To: OCCASparky; ScubieNuc
Don't get me wrong, I'm all for nuclear power. If they ever get around to building that "steam-turbine/thorium" reactor for cars, I'll probably buy one.

It was the terminology that struck me as funny. "Unusual event". They had an EARTHQUAKE. The systems were shut down, I assume as a precaution more than anything. Especially in light of what happened at Fukushima.

"Unusual" conjured up images of a Homer Simpson-esque mishap...

Thanks for the additional info though. :-)

96 posted on 08/24/2011 5:37:31 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (For those who fight for it, life has a flavor the sheltered will never know.)
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To: matt04; Sidebar Moderator

Curious as to why this is still #1 in Breaking News. A shutdown is Standard Operating Procedure and the breaking news part would be if it DIDN’T shut down. Are we fear-mongering or is there an unreported issue going on here? Just curious


97 posted on 08/24/2011 6:22:48 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (So much stress was put on Bush's Fault that it finally let go, magnitude 6)
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To: DKM; justa-hairyape

Thanks for the replies, particularly in light of your experience in the field.

Many interesting design issues in the back-up power systems area, especially in light of Fukushima. It was interesting that they fired-up a fifth generator to replace the one that went down. I’m still curious about whether the load requires two spinning per reactor, or whether they just need one and spin the other for back-up. In my ignorance spinning for back-up seems odd in light of low latency for them to come on line, wear and tear and fuel consumption, but I don’t know enough one way or the other.

I was wondering if the cause of the failure to the one genset was any threat to the others. Here it was a cooling system that leaked. Was that caused by the quake or some other cause common to all gensets, or was it isolated to that one? To what extent were the other gensets stressed or threatened by the quake? Obviously, they got 4 working, but was it a close call? Interesting stuff.

Thanks for keeping the lights on!


98 posted on 08/24/2011 7:02:52 AM PDT by Buckhead
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To: AndyJackson
You may have been an ex Navy nuclear submarine officer, but you apparently spent no time in commercial nuclear power conducting risk assessment studies. The power-grid by definition is a more reliable source of power than any single generator on a particular plant site. Your statement flies in the face of over 40 years of commercial nuclear power licensing and design. Any you are preaching to a degreed nuclear engineer from RPI who has worked in and around commercial nuclear power for more than 25 years -- since 1991 on risk assessment projects.
99 posted on 08/24/2011 9:33:27 AM PDT by sefarkas (Why vote Democrat Lite?)
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To: matt04

Neither Millstone nor VY reported a UE to NRC yesterday. See http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/event-status/event/2011/20110824en.html


100 posted on 08/24/2011 9:37:46 AM PDT by sefarkas (Why vote Democrat Lite?)
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