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New Blue Nightmare: Clarence Thomas and the Amendment of Doom
The American Interest ^ | August 28, 2011 | Walter Russell Mead

Posted on 08/29/2011 1:56:16 PM PDT by Da Bilge Troll

Lord of the Rings aficionados know that the evil lord Sauron paid little attention to the danger posed by two hobbits slowly struggling across the mountains and deserts of Mordor until he suddenly realized that the ring on which all his power depended was about to be hurled into the pits of Mount Doom. All at once the enemy plan became clear; what looked like stupidity was revealed as genius, and Sauron understood everything just when it was too late to act.

Jeffrey Toobin’s gripping, must-read profile of Clarence and Virginia Thomas in the New Yorker gives readers new insight into what Sauron must have felt: Toobin argues that the only Black man in public life that liberals could safely mock and despise may be on the point of bringing the Blue Empire down.

In fact, Toobin suggests, Clarence Thomas may be the Frodo Baggins of the right; his lonely and obscure struggle has led him to the point from which he may be able to overthrow the entire edifice of the modern progressive state.

Writes Toobin:

In several of the most important areas of constitutional law, Thomas has emerged as an intellectual leader of the Supreme Court. Since the arrival of Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., in 2005, and Justice Samuel A. Alito, Jr., in 2006, the Court has moved to the right when it comes to the free-speech rights of corporations, the rights of gun owners, and, potentially, the powers of the federal government; in each of these areas, the majority has followed where Thomas has been leading for a decade or more. Rarely has a Supreme Court Justice enjoyed such broad or significant vindication.

(Excerpt) Read more at blogs.the-american-interest.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Editorial; Extended News; Government; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: 10thamendment; clarencethomas; justicethomas; scotus; statesrights; supremecourt
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Long but well worth the read. History will place Justice Thomas among the greatest minds of our time.
1 posted on 08/29/2011 1:56:20 PM PDT by Da Bilge Troll
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To: Da Bilge Troll
Thomas is not Frodo!

But an excellent point. Clarence Thomas (a fellow Husker fan!) is not a small obscure being. He is one of the most powerful men in the world.

2 posted on 08/29/2011 2:05:34 PM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: redgolum
Thomas is not Frodo!

Is he Gandolf?

3 posted on 08/29/2011 2:06:46 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
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To: GeronL
The whole LOTR analogy is broken. Sauron did not discount the Hobbits, they successfully hid from him. He was intently searching for the ring the entire time.
4 posted on 08/29/2011 2:10:19 PM PDT by 5thGenTexan
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To: GeronL

Thomas will outlive Zer0’s influence.


5 posted on 08/29/2011 2:11:58 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Da Bilge Troll
Scalia and Thomas are 180 degrees apart on the Commerce Clause. Both can't be right. So which of the two is the true originalist and which is the pretender?

_____________________________________

...the authority to enact laws necessary and proper for the regulation of interstate commerce is not limited to laws governing intrastate activities that substantially affect interstate commerce. Where necessary to make a regulation of interstate commerce effective, Congress may regulate even those intrastate activities that do not themselves substantially affect interstate commerce.

J. Scalia, concurring in Raich

_____________________________________

Respondents Diane Monson and Angel Raich use marijuana that has never been bought or sold, that has never crossed state lines, and that has had no demonstrable effect on the national market for marijuana. If Congress can regulate this under the Commerce Clause, then it can regulate virtually anything, and the Federal Government is no longer one of limited and enumerated powers.

J.Thomas, dissenting in Raich

6 posted on 08/29/2011 2:12:02 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: GeronL

Gandalf.


7 posted on 08/29/2011 2:12:41 PM PDT by Humble Servant
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To: 5thGenTexan

Never seemed that the “ring of power” was all that powerful...the ring turned the wearer invisible. Big deal. Was there more to it?
(One of the few books of this genre that I couldn’t take reading ... got all my info from the movies)


8 posted on 08/29/2011 2:14:23 PM PDT by ChiefJayStrongbow
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To: Da Bilge Troll

Read for later. Thanks.


9 posted on 08/29/2011 2:14:28 PM PDT by ColoCdn (Neco eos omnes, Deus suos agnoset)
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To: 5thGenTexan

After reading his autobiography, my respect for him has only grown. I’m proud to be his son’s friend.


10 posted on 08/29/2011 2:15:08 PM PDT by VA_Gentleman ("Poor Al Gore. Global warming completely debunked via the very internet you invented." -Jon Stewart)
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To: Da Bilge Troll

Bookmarked!


11 posted on 08/29/2011 2:18:28 PM PDT by Inyo-Mono (My greatest fear is that when I'm gone my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them)
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To: Inyo-Mono

save


12 posted on 08/29/2011 2:21:35 PM PDT by Rumplemeyer (The GOP should stand its ground - and fix Bayonets)
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To: Da Bilge Troll; vecchia; broJoe

MUST READ. An absolutely vital article.


13 posted on 08/29/2011 2:21:47 PM PDT by denydenydeny (The moment you step into a world of facts, you step into a world of limits. --Chesterton)
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To: ChiefJayStrongbow

The Wheel of Time series by the late Robert Jordan was better, anyhow, IMO.


14 posted on 08/29/2011 2:24:35 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (I'll raise $2million for Gov. Sarah Palin. What'll you do?)
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To: ChiefJayStrongbow
Never seemed that the “ring of power” was all that powerful...the ring turned the wearer invisible. Big deal. Was there more to it? The invisibility thing was really more of a side effect. The Ring's powers included giving the wearer virtual immortality (as long as he possessed it), but more importantly, it gave the wearer (if he was suitably powerful in his own right) the power to control the other rings of power (including the three Elven rings, the nine rings of the Nazgul, and the seven rings of the Dwarves). Frodo couldn't do that himself, but he did have the ability to see things as they were on the other side. For example, he could see that Galadriel had one of the Elven rings (nobody else could see it on her finger).

All in all, the Lord of the Rings trilogy provides an interesting take on the lust for, and corrupting influence of, great power, with emphasis on its application in socialism. The chapter called "The Scouring of the Shire" provides a rather eerie and prescient picture of British society. This was left out of the final movie, of course.

15 posted on 08/29/2011 2:24:55 PM PDT by MissNomer
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To: ChiefJayStrongbow

It gave power, and corrupted one based on his (or her, in the case of Galadriel) native power. That is why the wise, such as Gandalf or Elrond, feared to hold the
Ring, even for safekeeping.
(OK, I’m a Tolkien geek)


16 posted on 08/29/2011 2:27:59 PM PDT by I-ambush (I didn't think, I never dreamed, that I would be around to see it all come true-McCartney and Wings)
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To: Paladin2

Hell, Zerø will outlive Zerø’s influence.


17 posted on 08/29/2011 2:29:32 PM PDT by AFreeBird
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To: Ken H

Thomas is correct, of course. I don’t understand Scalia on this...his argument is exactly the ste one the statits have used for decades to give nearly complete power to the federal government. Any idea that is distinty NOT in line with the Federalist intentions of our Founders.


18 posted on 08/29/2011 2:31:39 PM PDT by pgkdan (Time for a Cain Mutiny!)
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To: Ken H; Da Bilge Troll

Thomas is correct, and true to the original intent of the Founders.

I have always admired and respected Scalia. He has an incredibly brilliant mind, but somewhere along the road he lost his way and ended up in a statist mindset. He’s no friend of the Second Amendment either. Tragic.


19 posted on 08/29/2011 2:32:20 PM PDT by tarheelswamprat
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To: Ken H
Wickard v. Filburn must die. We will not have our country back before the Court restores the plain meaning of "regulate commerce between the several states" to its original intention: to make commerce consistent - not to control it without limitation.
20 posted on 08/29/2011 2:32:52 PM PDT by andy58-in-nh (America does not need to be organized: it needs to be liberated.)
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To: Da Bilge Troll

The fact that Thomas remains silent during oral arguments reminds me of the story of another Thomas, a very tall heavyset youth who seldom spoke in school, so that all the other students called him the “Dumb Ox.” We know him as St. Thomas Aquinas.


21 posted on 08/29/2011 2:32:57 PM PDT by I-ambush (I didn't think, I never dreamed, that I would be around to see it all come true-McCartney and Wings)
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To: AFreeBird

whatddda bout Zorr0?


22 posted on 08/29/2011 2:33:11 PM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Da Bilge Troll

“If we wish to be true to a Constitution that does not cede a police power to the Federal Government, our Commerce Clause’s boundaries simply cannot be “defined” as being “ `commensurate with the national needs’ “ or self consciously intended to let the Federal Government “ defend itself against economic forces that Congress decrees inimical or destructive of the national economy.”

- Clarence Thomas UNITED STATES, PETITIONER v. ALFONSO LOPEZ, Jr. 1995


23 posted on 08/29/2011 2:34:28 PM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife (Utopia is being foisted on Americans for their own good.-- J. Robert Smith)
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To: ChiefJayStrongbow

There was a lot more to it...if you knew how to use it. Gandalf, Sauron and the leaders of the High Elves could have used it. Frodo and Bilbo didn’t have the knowledge. In hands of an ordinary man or Hobbit, it was essentially equivalent to having weapons-grade plutonium, but no idea how to turn that into a bomb or nuclear reactor.


24 posted on 08/29/2011 2:34:47 PM PDT by sourcery (If true=false, then there would be no constraints on what is possible. Hence, the world exists.)
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To: Da Bilge Troll

Very interesting! In The New Yorker yet.

I heard him speak once and he is very brilliant. He’s a very measured speaker so you’re not waiting for any flash and dazzle rhetoric, but he comes out with careful and precise point after point, all right on target.


25 posted on 08/29/2011 2:34:47 PM PDT by livius
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To: Da Bilge Troll
But wait! I kept reading about how Justice Thomas was a dullard who only mimicked the vote of Scalia, and the only reason he was nominated for the SCOTUS was that his white puppet masters wanted an "Uncle Tom" on the court. I've heard that in one form or another since he was first nominated and went through the "high tech lynching."

Mark

26 posted on 08/29/2011 2:38:17 PM PDT by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
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To: 5thGenTexan

You haven’t read the book, have you? The failure of Sauron to prepare for the hobbits (compare to Star Wars’ evil empire’s failure to defend against a lone X-wing fighter) was something deeply woven into the story. He was looking for the ring but expected that the bearer would inevitably be captured by him, because he expected the bearer to be a human. He hadn’t counted on hobbits, which were so unambitious and incurious as to be largely immune to the ring’s power, and he hadn’t counted on Smeagal, the perverted hobbit, and his banal level of evil.


27 posted on 08/29/2011 2:39:42 PM PDT by dangus
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To: Da Bilge Troll

Just another Georgia fella getting it right!

You rock Clarence.

Gosh, does that make me a racist?


28 posted on 08/29/2011 2:44:27 PM PDT by Dick Bachert (The 2012 election is coming. Seems we have MORE TRASH TO REMOVE!)
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To: Ken H
Wasn't there a similar case, where a dairy farmer was growing his own grain to feed his own cattle, and the court decided that he was interfering with interstate commerce because by feeding his cattle his own feed, he wasn't buying feed, and was participating in interstate commerce, because he was hurting feed producers. Therefore the court ruled that the government COULD regulate his purchase, or decision not to purchase, feed for his cattle. Crazy!!!

I agree with Justice Thomas here!

Mark

29 posted on 08/29/2011 2:44:39 PM PDT by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
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To: ChiefJayStrongbow

Immortality. Elves were not truly immortal, only ageless. The ring made one impervious, not merely ageless, and therefore capable of anything in battle.


30 posted on 08/29/2011 2:46:27 PM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus
So I guess we have to agree to disagree.

I believe that Sauron was intently looking for the ring throughout. And, that included hobbits. The riders were looking for hobbits at the Prancing Pony in Bree.

The reason he did not see it was the hobbits rarely used it due to their nature. Putting the ring on gave Sauron a connection to its location. Every time someone did that, Sauron zoomed in. The ring kept tempting Frodo, but the hobbits' nature gave him the ability to resist (with a little help from Samwise on occasion). And wasn't Smeagal one of the "river folk", considered a different, though similar, race than the hobbits?

OK, geek critical mass has been achieved. No matter which of us is right, we both need to get a life.

:-)

31 posted on 08/29/2011 2:57:54 PM PDT by 5thGenTexan
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To: Ken H

They differ because Thomas understands the underlying philosophy of Natural Law Theory and inalienable rights which come from God and is consistent in his thinking which is VERY logical....since logic originated in the laws of nature.

Scalia has “reasoned” that abortion rights can be “voted” on by states. THAT would be Constitutional????? Never, not with the understanding of inalienable rights—made so clear in our constitution and by Natural Law Theory....which says that inalienable rights can NEVER be given away or taken away. NEVER.

This fundamental meaning of our Constitution is destroying the very Rule of Law and creating man made-up laws not based on God’s law and the laws of nature....so we get all bizarre sort of “reasoning” like two men can “marry”. Such idiocy (and unconstitutional) is the thinking of Scalia at times.

Natural Rights of human beings can never be voted away like in Nazi Germany and Stalin’s Gulags. Our laws believe in a Supreme Law—Objective Truth. To deny God, is to deny that we have Natural Rights.

Right Reason according to Nature (God’s Law) is the basis of all Just Law in the US—or should be....we have seen very irrational things (Marxism) codified into laws here though.

Supra Positive Law==which exists in the US can declare these “null and void” and should if we were operating under the Constitution of the US instead of the USSR which established a separation of God and State.


32 posted on 08/29/2011 3:00:37 PM PDT by savagesusie
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To: Da Bilge Troll
If you want to fix the debt and deficit crisis. read this

"...Taken seriously today, that approach to the Constitution would change the way Washington does business. Radically. The list of enumerated powers is short and does not include, for example, health care, education, agricultural subsidies, assistance to the hungry or old age pensions. Most of the New Deal and Great Society (with the interesting exception of civil rights laws which enforce the Civil War era amendments) would be struck down. Whole cabinet departments would close..."


Hence no need for back room deals, negotiations with liars, libtards and losers...If it is not in there, you CAN NOT DO IT! If it is in there YOU CAN NOT TOUCH IT! In fact your favorite DC Rinos would not even have to grow a spine!! hahahah!!


Great article and artillery for the coming fight in 2012...

33 posted on 08/29/2011 3:04:40 PM PDT by Nat Turner (I can see NOVEMBER 2012 from my house....)
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To: livius
In The New Yorker yet.

I'm thinking that Toobin, a liberal, used that forum to alert the lefty world that their standard 20-year old Clarence Thomas meme needs to change. The Left is particularly fond of the existing Thomas theme--that he's a dumb, shiftless sex maniac/-because it allows them to be as racist as they want to be without any repercussions.

To use another Tolkien analogy, Toobin is trying to light the beacons.

34 posted on 08/29/2011 3:13:43 PM PDT by denydenydeny (The moment you step into a world of facts, you step into a world of limits. --Chesterton)
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To: Ken H
So which of the two is the true originalist and which is the pretender?

Clearly, Thomas is the originalist.

Bless him for being the conservative jurist that he is, but Scalia's argument smacks of expediency.

35 posted on 08/29/2011 3:24:59 PM PDT by okie01 (THE MAINSTREAM MEDIA: Ignorance On Parade)
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To: MarkL

Wickard v Filburn.

Insanity, institutionalized.


36 posted on 08/29/2011 3:33:40 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: Da Bilge Troll
Excellent article!

The Huffington Post reported on August 16, 2008, following the Saddleback interview with then-presidential-candidate Obama, the following:

"I would not have nominated Clarence Thomas," said the presumptive Democratic nominee. "I don't think that he...' the crowd interrupted with applause. 'I don't think that he was a strong enough jurist or legal thinker at the time for that elevation. Setting aside the fact that I profoundly disagree with his interpretations of a lot of the constitution.'"

Three years later, and we now have Toobin, certainly not a conservative legal thinker, saying:

"In several of the most important areas of constitutional law, Thomas has emerged as an intellectual leader of the Supreme Court. Since the arrival of Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., in 2005, and Justice Samuel A. Alito, Jr., in 2006, the Court has moved to the right when it comes to the free-speech rights of corporations, the rights of gun owners, and, potentially, the powers of the federal government; in each of these areas, the majority has followed where Thomas has been leading for a decade or more. Rarely has a Supreme Court Justice enjoyed such broad or significant vindication."

Generally, most might agree that Justice Thomas views the Constitution in a manner which would be somewhat consistent with the following declaration by Thomas Jefferson, America's third President:

"On every question of construction [of the Constitution] let us carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates, and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text, or intended against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed." - -Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Johnson, 12 June 1823

Inasmuch as Justice Thomas over a lifetime, most likely, has immersed himself in study of the writings and speeches of America's Founders, the great fountains of wisdom from which (and from whom) they drew their ideas about liberty, the human tendency to abuse delegated power, and the history of civilization's struggle against tyranny, one understands better his tendency to listen more than to speak, as well as his emergence as an "intellectual leader" on the Court.

As for the value one places on Presidential opinions about "interpretations" of the Constitution, or their personal evaluations of "legal thinkers," then one might need to examine the depth of study of that President and how he/she views the role, reach, and scope of government structured by the Founders' written Constitution for a free society.

One early President, James Madison, who came to be known as the "father" of the Constitution because of his role in the Convention, believed government's beneficial function to be "benign." He said:

"The enviable condition of the people of the United States is often too much ascribed to the physical advantages of their soil & climate .... But a just estimate of the happiness of our country will never overlook what belongs to the fertile activity of a free people and the benign influence of a responsible government." - James Madison

In the Year 2011, with our understanding of the stark and sometimes deadly differences between the quality of being "benign" and of being "malignant" as it pertains to our bodies, we are presented with an almost graphic difference between Madison's understanding of a constitutionally-limited government whose "influence" is "benign," and an understanding which favors enormous and invasive government power.

A logical conclusion to such reasoning might be that President Madison's opinion of Justice Clarence Thomas as "legal thinker" and "jurist" might be vastly different than President Obama's.

37 posted on 08/29/2011 3:45:40 PM PDT by loveliberty2
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To: MarkL; All

About Clarence Thomas, The Honorable Justice of the United States of America

http://alt.coxnewsweb.com/ajc/swf/gullah/movie2.swf

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas was raised as a Gullah speaker in coastal Georgia. When asked why he has little to say during hearings of the court, he told a high school student that the ridicule he received for his Gullah speech as a young man caused him to develop the habit of listening rather than speaking in public.[4] Thomas’s English-speaking grandfather raised him after the age of six in Savannah.[

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gullah_language


38 posted on 08/29/2011 4:02:04 PM PDT by GOYAKLA (Re-flush Congress in 2012, some crap remains!)
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To: tarheelswamprat

If Scalia is no friend of the Second Amendment, then neither is Thomas, since Thomas did not dissent from Scalia’s opinion in, or even write a separate concurring opinion for, District of Columbia v. Heller.

I think that they’re both pretty solid on the Second Amendment.


39 posted on 08/29/2011 4:07:34 PM PDT by AuH2ORepublican (If a politician won't protect innocent babies, what makes you think that he'll protect your rights?)
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To: MarkL
Therefore the court ruled that the government COULD regulate his purchase, or decision not to purchase, feed for his cattle. Crazy!!!

So deciding not to do something is participating in it?

Insane. I guess I robbed the bank, supported the RATS, and built that new barn all because I decided against it.

40 posted on 08/29/2011 5:22:47 PM PDT by SteamShovel (Smart Grid is Stupid)
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To: andy58-in-nh; MarkL; tacticalogic

Wickard v. Filburn was rejected in 1787.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-bloggers/2741806/posts

If I found this from the Constitutional Convention, the Harvard lawyer wizards of Scotus in the FDR era knew it as well.


41 posted on 08/29/2011 5:33:27 PM PDT by Jacquerie
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To: Da Bilge Troll

Would that the author be right that Justice Thomas’ efforts will reverse the federal power grab via the commerce clause. If the next election installs a decent conservative to replace what we now have, perhaps the nation will be steered toward the Founding Fathers’ original vision.


42 posted on 08/29/2011 6:31:03 PM PDT by Darnright (There can never be a complete confidence in a power which is excessive. - Tacitus)
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To: 5thGenTexan
And wasn't Smeagal one of the "river folk", considered a different, though similar, race than the hobbits?

You could call Sméagol a hobbit. You could also call him a sort of cousin of the Shire (and Bree) hobbits.

The ancestral hobbits developed into three races, the Fallohides, Harfoots, and Stoors, who lived in the upper Anduin valley (a good ways north of Lothlórien). In the mid-Third Age, most hobbits migrated west into Eriador, eventually settling in Bree and later the Shire as well. By the late Third Age, when LotR takes place, the three races were pretty well intermingled in Eriador.

From the Encyclopedia of Arda, "Gollum's identification as a Stoor is based on Gandalf's words in The Lord of the Rings I 2 The Shadow of the Past, 'I guess they were of hobbit-kind, akin to the fathers of the fathers of the Stoors'. Gollum's people split from the other Stoors in the fifteenth century of the Third Age, when troubled times in Eriador led them to migrate back eastwards across the Misty Mountains, and settle on the banks of the Gladden River."
http://www.glyphweb.com/arda/g/gollum.html

43 posted on 08/29/2011 6:41:53 PM PDT by Tea Party Hobbit (The RINOs lack all conviction, and the Dems are full of passionate intensity)
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To: Darnright
Would that the author be right that Justice Thomas’ efforts will reverse the federal power grab via the commerce clause. If the next election installs a decent conservative to replace what we now have, perhaps the nation will be steered toward the Founding Fathers’ original vision.

We're going to have to do something different than what we've been doing before that's going to happen. GWB claimed to want Supreme Court justices that subscribed to an "original intent" interpretation of the Constitution during his campaign. The he sent his Justice Department before the court to argue to uphold Wickard v Filburn in the Raisch case.

44 posted on 08/29/2011 6:53:15 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: Jacquerie
From the looks of Carter v Carter Coal, they were still rejecting in in 1936.

Stare decisis? I don't see any reason to feel any more bound by it than they did.

45 posted on 08/29/2011 7:00:22 PM PDT by tacticalogic
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To: Ken H
Not a doubt in my mind, Thomas nailed it.

Disclaimer: I hate drugs, even pot. If I were the Dictato POTUS, I would do a lot more than waterboard purveyors of such evil and human destruction.
46 posted on 08/29/2011 8:06:27 PM PDT by papasmurf (0bama...just doing the job Americans won't do.)
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To: papasmurf
If you were POTUS, would you leave medical pot alone at the state level?

Suppose a state legalizes pot, which I believe is likely to happen in this decade. Do you send in the feds to close it down, or do you let the state decide?

47 posted on 08/29/2011 10:12:33 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: Da Bilge Troll

Too bad not even one of them will face up to the fact that the child in the womb is a person, and therefore should be protected by the explicit, imperative requirements of our Constitution.


48 posted on 08/29/2011 10:18:16 PM PDT by EternalVigilance ('If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the opposite direction.')
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To: Ken H

In a perfect world, yes, it would be a State issue. We don’t live in a perfect world, no such world exists in reality. It’s become intensely complex, and turned inside out. Reality bites.

If pot truly is a medicine, it should be a controlled substance, approved by the FDA, manufactured under controlled circumstances and under license, prescribed by a doctor, and dispensed through a pharmacy. I could tell you that it is a psychoactive drug, a dissassociative hallucinogen. But you probably know that. I could tell you that it has been peer pushed onto our children, told that it’s not harmful and, yes, it does lead to worse drugs and drug use. But you might dispute that. There’s a lot I could say in defense of my position, but I won’t. I’ll just finish by saying...

I believe evil is real, it exists. Evil uses anything to propagate itself, and drugs are just one of the many ways it does that. Millions have lost their lives to it, many by murder, and millions more lives have been wasted and ruined because of it. Evil transcends oceans and borders and it respects no class or position or child.

Drugs are evil.


49 posted on 08/30/2011 5:02:45 AM PDT by papasmurf (0bama...just doing the job Americans won't do.)
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To: EternalVigilance
Amen.

With consistency, beautiful and undeviating, human life, from its commencement to its close, is protected by the common law. In the contemplation of law, life begins when the infant is first able to stir in the womb. By the law, life is protected not only from immediate destruction, but from every degree of actual violence, and, in some cases, from every degree of danger.

James Wilson, a framer of the U.S. Constitution.


I believe that "stir in the womb" in that time was the limit of then current knowledge/technology. Today, we know the following...

heart... At 21 days--when the mother is only seven days late for her first menstrual period--it is pumping, through a closed circulatory system.
brain... In just the fifth week after conception, the first synapses begin forming in a fetus's spinal cord.
body... In the sixth week, early neural connections permit the first fetal movements--spontaneous arches and curls of the whole body.
50 posted on 08/30/2011 5:26:14 AM PDT by papasmurf (0bama...just doing the job Americans won't do.)
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