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Cantaloupes Recalled After Listeria Outbreak (3 deaths in NM, 1 in CO so far)
Wall Street Journal ^ | SEPTEMBER 14, 2011

Posted on 09/14/2011 7:03:45 PM PDT by bd476

Edited on 09/14/2011 7:19:16 PM PDT by Admin Moderator. [history]


< Snip >

"...'Colorado has stated...that people at a high risk for infection should not eat whole cantaloupe from the Rocky Ford growing region." The recall covers cantaloupes sold between July 29 and Sept. 10..."

< Snip >

"...Eleven illnesses in Colorado, one in Indiana, one in Nebraska, one in Oklahoma and two in Texas are linked to the listeriosis outbreak and contaminated cantaloupes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The 11 illnesses in Colorado include one death, said CDC spokeswoman Lola Russell..."

< Snip >

"...Jensen Farms said it shipped the recalled cantaloupes to Illinois, Wyoming, Tennessee, Utah, Texas, Colorado, Minnesota, Kansas, New Mexico, North Carolina, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Arizona, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

Listeriosis usually causes fever, muscle aches and diarrhea or other gastrointestinal problems, according to the CDC..."



TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: Arizona; US: Colorado; US: Illinois; US: Indiana; US: Kansas; US: Minnesota; US: Missouri; US: Nebraska; US: New Jersey; US: New Mexico; US: New York; US: North Carolina; US: Oklahoma; US: Pennsylvania; US: Tennessee; US: Texas; US: Utah; US: Wyoming
KEYWORDS: cantaloupe; jensenfarms; listeriosis; recall

KOAT TV / ABC News
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.

Melons Recalled After Deadly Bacteria Outbreak



UPDATED: 9:06 am MDT September 14, 2011

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- A voluntary recall is now in effect for certain cantaloupes after the state said the fruit is probably linked to a deadly outbreak of bacteria sweeping across the country.

The numbers are concerning with three New Mexicans dead, 10 confirmed cases and more suspected cases being evaluated.

Consumers are urged to buy with caution because it’s looking more and more likely that a whole crop of cantaloupe from southern Colorado is behind the deadly listeria outbreak.

'The signs are all pointing towards these Rocky Four cantaloupes," Dr. Mark Dimenna said.... End excerpt. Story continues here:

Melons Recalled After Deadly Bacteria Outbreak


1 posted on 09/14/2011 7:03:47 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476

Yikes! I guess I’m going to lay off the cantaloupe for a while.


2 posted on 09/14/2011 7:07:57 PM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Only two things come out of the DemocRAT Party. Fears and Smears.)
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To: FlingWingFlyer

It is getting so you don’t dare eat anything anymore. :-(


3 posted on 09/14/2011 7:10:20 PM PDT by Spunky (Sarah Palin on Polls "Poles are for Strippers and Cross Country Skiers")
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To: FlingWingFlyer
Cantaloupe is one of my favorite foods yet even well washed, this is serious enough for me to skip eating cantaloupe altogether until they give the "all clear."

4 posted on 09/14/2011 7:10:37 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476

Were they organic???


5 posted on 09/14/2011 7:12:25 PM PDT by SkyDancer (A critic is like a legless man who teaches running.)
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To: bd476
yet even well washed, this is serious enough for me to skip eating cantaloupe altogether until they give the "all clear."

Now just a bleepin second...are you indicating they were eating the rinds...or licking the skins? What the?

How do you "accidentally" contaminate the inside of a melon?

6 posted on 09/14/2011 7:18:30 PM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER ( Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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To: ROCKLOBSTER

As soon as you slice through a melon, you contaminate the inside. The knife blade carries bacteria from the outside of the melon onto anything it touches, including the edible part.


7 posted on 09/14/2011 7:24:04 PM PDT by Fantasywriter
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To: SkyDancer
SkyDancer wrote: "Were they organic???"

I don't know.

8 posted on 09/14/2011 7:27:36 PM PDT by bd476
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To: ROCKLOBSTER
ROCKLOBSTER wrote: " ' yet even well washed, this is serious enough for me to skip eating cantaloupe altogether until they give the "all clear." '

Now just a bleepin second...are you indicating they were eating the rinds...or licking the skins? What the?

How do you "accidentally" contaminate the inside of a melon?


I couldn't find any information about how they were contaminated, whether they were grown contaminated that is, without being cut, or whether the people didn't wash the outside of the cantaloupe before cutting them open.

Unwashed cantaloupe causing sickness would make more sense. Theoretically the knife blade would cut through a contaminated rind carrying the bacteria to the edible inside.


9 posted on 09/14/2011 7:30:07 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476

Usually it seems that when fruits and veggies have problems it comes out that they’re organically grown or from SA.


10 posted on 09/14/2011 7:30:51 PM PDT by SkyDancer (A critic is like a legless man who teaches running.)
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To: Fantasywriter

Sensible folks, who love cantaloupe, will just do diligence, and wash the outside with bleach and water before cutting into the deliciousness found inside.

Enough with these alarms, already!

Doesn’t any sensible woman know how to “keep house” these days? If you haven’t managed to snag one of these rare gems, get busy teaching your beloved other that she is worth her weight in gold coins, if only she gets up on this “housewifery stuff”.

As the old song said:

Can she bake a cherry pit, Billy-Boy, Billy Boy?


11 posted on 09/14/2011 7:31:53 PM PDT by jacquej
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To: jacquej

I wash all my fruits and vegetables, but I never thought of using bleach. No way listeria could survive that; it’s also the only effective way to kill the parvo dog bug.


12 posted on 09/14/2011 7:34:07 PM PDT by Fantasywriter
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To: jacquej

ah, for the edit function here on FR! particularly later in the evening.

“pit” = “pie”.

But so many of you are probably too young to even know the song, so I am just wasting pixels.


13 posted on 09/14/2011 7:34:07 PM PDT by jacquej
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To: bd476; a fool in paradise; JoeProBono
Cantaloupes should be used as cannon fodder, that's all.
That's my opinion and you are allowed to disagree!

(I've once killed a man with a cantaloupe, just to watch him die.)

14 posted on 09/14/2011 7:35:10 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Let us prey!)
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To: bd476
Theoretically the knife blade would cut through a contaminated rind carrying the bacteria to the edible inside.

A perfectly logical explanation. If that's the case, it must be a real virulent pathogen.

15 posted on 09/14/2011 7:47:14 PM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER ( Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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To: Fantasywriter

What about using vinegar....that’s what I do - spray stuff with vinegar, then wash...


16 posted on 09/14/2011 7:54:43 PM PDT by goodnesswins (My Kid/Grandkids are NOT your ATM, liberals! (Sarah Palin))
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To: FlingWingFlyer; Spunky; SkyDancer; ROCKLOBSTER; jacquej; Fantasywriter; Revolting cat!; ...

The clue to the contamination may found be in the natural netted fibrous outer cantaloupe rind which is more difficult to properly clean.

Another possibility is pre-cut cantaloupe which is improperly prepared, improperly refrigerated and then sold as ready to eat.

The most likely cause might be damaged cantaloupe where the rind has unnoticed bruising or some kind of damage. I found a Canadian Health Safety website which had information about safe handling of melons. See below:




Safe Handling of Melons

How can melons become contaminated?


Fresh melons and other fruits and vegetables do not naturally contain bacteria that can make you sick.

Because melons are grown close to the ground, their outer skin or rind can become contaminated in the field by soil, contaminated water, wild and domestic animals or improperly composted manure. Bacteria may also be transferred during and after harvest from handling, storing and transporting.

Fresh fruit and vegetables, including melons, can also become contaminated with disease-causing bacteria when they come into contact with raw food items such as meat, poultry, seafood and their juices. Such contaminations can happen at the grocery store, in the shopping cart, in the refrigerator or from counters and cutting boards at home.

In particular, cantaloupe is at greater risk of contamination because of its unique netted rind. The spaces between the netting can trap bacteria and make them harder to remove.

When choosing melons, make sure to choose ones that are firm, not bruised or damaged.

The melon can become contaminated through the bruises and damage to the hard outer rind or skin.

Foodborne Illness and Symptoms

Foodborne illness or food poisoning happens when a person gets sick from eating foods that are contaminated with microorganisms such as bacteria, parasites or viruses. Bacteria that has been linked to food poisoning and melons is Salmonella.

The most common symptoms of foodborne illness include:

It is estimated that there are approximately 11 million cases of food-related illnesses in Canada every year. Many of these illnesses could be prevented by following proper food handling and preparation techniques.

Safe Handling of Melons





17 posted on 09/14/2011 8:05:55 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476; All

One warning about listeria.

Most food-borne bacteria have a hard time in the fridge. They like it warmer 55 degrees upwards.

Not listeria!

Listeria is happy as a clam in your fridge, and given the right foods, etc, can multiply like wildfire. Even in the 40 degree temps of most fridges.

Anybody suspecting listeria contamination in their fridge would do well to unload it, unplug it, ans give it a good washing with soapy water and bleach.


18 posted on 09/14/2011 8:15:07 PM PDT by djf (Buncha sheep: A flock.. Buncha cows: A herd.. Buncha fish: A school.. Buncha baboons: A Congress..)
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To: bd476

Get some So. Dak. melons. They are the best.


19 posted on 09/14/2011 8:17:04 PM PDT by Big Horn (Rebuild the GOP to a conservative party)
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To: djf; FlingWingFlyer; Spunky; SkyDancer; ROCKLOBSTER; jacquej; Fantasywriter; Revolting cat!; ...
djf wrote: One warning about listeria.

Most food-borne bacteria have a hard time in the fridge. They like it warmer 55 degrees upwards.

Not listeria!

Listeria is happy as a clam in your fridge, and given the right foods, etc, can multiply like wildfire. Even in the 40 degree temps of most fridges.

Anybody suspecting listeria contamination in their fridge would do well to unload it, unplug it, and give it a good washing with soapy water and bleach.

Yikes, I didn't know that listeria could survive low temperatures. Thank you, DJF.


20 posted on 09/14/2011 8:25:24 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476

But how do you know? Is it best to wash everything in a mild bleach solution? How long does listeria survive?


21 posted on 09/14/2011 8:27:12 PM PDT by SkyDancer (A critic is like a legless man who teaches running.)
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To: Big Horn
Big Horn wrote: "Get some So. Dak. melons. They are the best."

Thanks. I don't know if I have ever noticed where my cantaloupe are grown except in the USA. I'll look for South Dakota melons in the store.

I'm still going to remain cautious when handling, cutting and serving any kind of melon. Every year it seems there is a recall or FDA warning about melons causing an outbreak of illness.

22 posted on 09/14/2011 8:30:18 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476

Isn’t that always the case. I spurge and buy a cantaloupe and now I have to throw it out.


23 posted on 09/14/2011 9:04:26 PM PDT by bgill (There, happy now?)
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To: bgill
bgill wrote: "Isn’t that always the case. I spurge and buy a cantaloupe and now I have to throw it out."

Heh, yes, I'm looking at a Honey Dew Melon wondering whether to chance it or toss it out.

24 posted on 09/14/2011 9:09:29 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bgill

Send it to me! Heck, for 99% of people, a bad case of listeria amounts to a bit of the runs.

Eat pieces of it on an empty stomach and your stomach acids should kill it good!

Another problem with many food illnesses is that people often get them IN COMBINATION with a bad cold or flu, making it seem much worse than it is, because your immune system is already compromised.

If you ever been to Mexico, a cantaloupe ain’t gonna kill ya!


25 posted on 09/14/2011 9:12:54 PM PDT by djf (Buncha sheep: A flock.. Buncha cows: A herd.. Buncha fish: A school.. Buncha baboons: A Congress..)
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To: jacquej
But so many of you are probably too young to even know the song, so I am just wasting pixels.

I'll waste some more pixels. Just couldn't resist.. She can bake a cherry pie quick as a cat can blink her eyes, she's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.

26 posted on 09/14/2011 9:14:09 PM PDT by Gosh I love this neighborhood
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To: bd476

The honeydew should be fine. It has a smooth skin which can be cleaned easily.


27 posted on 09/14/2011 9:28:49 PM PDT by bgill (There, happy now?)
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To: bgill
bgill wrote: "The honeydew should be fine. It has a smooth skin which can be cleaned easily."

Good, thanks! :)

28 posted on 09/14/2011 9:30:30 PM PDT by bd476
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To: jacquej

Men can’t understand how to cut open their own cantaloupe? Yikes! We are in trouble as a country.


29 posted on 09/15/2011 6:21:40 AM PDT by coop71 (Being a redhead means never having to say you're sorry...)
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To: djf

You mean that really bad day I had in Guadalajara Mexico 27 years ago immunized me from THAT again!???


30 posted on 09/15/2011 7:49:46 AM PDT by goodnesswins (My Kid/Grandkids are NOT your ATM, liberals! (Sarah Palin))
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To: bd476; LegendHasIt; Rogle; leapfrog0202; Santa Fe_Conservative; DesertDreamer; OneWingedShark; ...

NM list PING! Click on the flag to go to the Free Republic New Mexico message page.

(The NM list is available on my FR homepage for anyone to use. Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from the list.)

31 posted on 09/15/2011 10:03:16 AM PDT by CedarDave (Hurricane Irene -- cleanup will give the economy the stimulus Obama wants (US taxpayers pay))
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To: bd476; Joya

PING to referent post.

HOpefully not necessary . . .


32 posted on 09/15/2011 10:19:44 AM PDT by Quix (Times are a changin' INSURE you have believed in your heart & confessed Jesus as Lord Come NtheFlesh)
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To: bd476
It seems like the vector for Listeriosis
is In veterinary medicine, listeriosis can
be a quite common condition in some
farm outbreaks.
It can also be found in wild animals;
see listeriosis in animals.

Listeriosis is an infectious but not contagious
disease caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes,
far more common in domestics animals
(domestic mammals and poultry), especially ruminants,
than in human beings. It can also occur in feral animals
—among others, game animals
—as well as in poultry and other birds.

The causative bacterium lives in the soil
and in poorly made silage and is acquired by ingestion.
In sheep, the disease is also called the "circling disease"

Listeriosis is relatively rare and occurs primarily in newborn infants,
elderly patients, and patients who are immunocompromised.


33 posted on 09/15/2011 10:42:12 AM PDT by Uri’el-2012 (Psalm 119:174 I long for Your salvation, YHvH, Your law is my delight.)
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To: bd476

What is odd is we usually eat a lot of cantelopes in the summer- I usually grow a few and buy some too. This year I didn’t grow any vegetables and every time I looked at cantelopes in the store they looked sorry so didn’t buy any either. Good thing!


34 posted on 09/15/2011 11:01:58 AM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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To: Tammy8

Before I get corrected I know cantelope is not a vegetable- I didn’t grow a garden at all this year just to be clear to the posting police. I only grew flowers, and not the ones on cantelope vines.


35 posted on 09/15/2011 11:07:58 AM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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To: ROCKLOBSTER

I”m assuming that when you slice it your knife goes thru the rind and contaminates the fruit. I never wash the rind, it never occurred to me to do it.


36 posted on 09/15/2011 2:57:14 PM PDT by brytlea (Wake me when it's over...)
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To: jacquej

I have never in my life washed the outside of a cantaloupe and I have never in my life caught anything from them. Obviously this is now added to my list of things to do, but I consider myself fairly well up on kitchen hygiene and this is not something I have heard of before.


37 posted on 09/15/2011 3:00:22 PM PDT by brytlea (Wake me when it's over...)
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Comment #38 Removed by Moderator

To: djf

Thank you for that info.


39 posted on 09/15/2011 3:04:08 PM PDT by brytlea (Wake me when it's over...)
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To: bd476

i’m wondering if they washed the melon with soap and water before cutting it???


40 posted on 09/15/2011 8:48:25 PM PDT by Coleus
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To: brytlea

I didn’t used to wash the rind either but in past few years I have....and then, after cutting thru washed rind, I rinse the knife....before cutting up cantaloupe....paranoid, I guess.


41 posted on 09/15/2011 9:09:55 PM PDT by goodnesswins (My Kid/Grandkids are NOT your ATM, liberals! (Sarah Palin))
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To: TigersEye

ut oh ping


42 posted on 09/15/2011 9:27:22 PM PDT by pandoraou812 (I have a very firm grasp on reality! I can reach out and strangle it any time!)
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To: pandoraou812

I bought a whole Rocky Ford cantaloupe last Thur. at the farmer’s market. I ate some three days ago. W/vanilla ice cream. I was deeeeelicious! ;-)


43 posted on 09/15/2011 9:37:08 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: goodnesswins

I will now! I am scrupulous with things like raw meat, cooked foods (leaving it out of the fridge for instance). I always wash vegetables and fruits in which you eat the skin but really never thought about washing things like melons. Now that seems a little dumb. Heck, I won’t drink out of a bottled water if it sits out of the fridge overnight.
And I do consider myself just a little germophobic.
Well, one more thing to add to my list. :)


44 posted on 09/16/2011 11:43:54 AM PDT by brytlea (Wake me when it's over...)
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