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Hay The Latest Target For Thieves As Prices Skyrocket
CBS DFW ^ | September 22, 2011 | Staff

Posted on 09/24/2011 11:23:39 AM PDT by bkopto

If the drought wasn’t enough for farmers and ranchers to struggle with, now they are facing a growing threat. Thieves are targeting pastures and barns for suddenly valuable hay bales.

It’s the nature of ranchers like James Lockridge to give you something if you need it badly enough. “Come up and ask us. Surely we can work something out.”

Mitch Waters runs a feed store that’s such a fixture, people drive 50 miles to shop there. “Got out of school in 77 and been here ever since.”

But now both men, are putting their livelihoods behind locks. Signs are posted, keep out. They know where all the area security cameras are, and are intent on protecting something that’s never been worth as much as it is right now. “Our convenient hay barn here, for just the drive up customers.”

Yes, hay, is the new target for thieves. Round bales that used to sell for $20 are now topping $175.

(Excerpt) Read more at dfw.cbslocal.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News
KEYWORDS: inflation; obamasfault; preparedness; texasdrought

1 posted on 09/24/2011 11:23:50 AM PDT by bkopto
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To: All

AC coils, manhole covers, and now hay. Welcome to the 0bama economy.


2 posted on 09/24/2011 11:29:32 AM PDT by pepperhead (Kennedys float, Mary Jos don't)
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To: bkopto

Every rancher I know has had to reduce their herds as hay was too expensive of simply cannot by found.

Rough times here in Texas with the severe drought.


3 posted on 09/24/2011 11:31:11 AM PDT by trumandogz
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To: bkopto

The sad part is that horses are really suffering. People can’t afford their upkeep, so they’re abandoning them or taking money from hoof care, teeth floating and worming in order to continue to provide food. The horse rescues are overwhelmed.

A few years ago we went through this and we gave up our Arabian gelding.

That was if we could find it. There were many scary moments when we were desperately calling around to find a supplier. At that time hay went up to $90 for a round barrel and people were getting desperate. Orders were being put in months in advance.

On a positive note; I can now get half a steer for $150.


4 posted on 09/24/2011 11:35:10 AM PDT by Marie (Heartless conservative)
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To: pepperhead

“AC coils, manhole covers, and now hay. Welcome to the 0bama economy.”

Back in 2006 a manhole cover right in front of my house was stolen.

But, I’m not all that sure that our political leaders are responsible for the amount of rain we receive.

However, I recall one Freeper claiming that the government had means by which they could control the weather.


5 posted on 09/24/2011 11:35:35 AM PDT by trumandogz
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To: pepperhead

“Welcome to the 0bama economy.”

Sort of a Cuban/Zimbabwean feel, does it?


6 posted on 09/24/2011 11:36:40 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (Don't like Perry? Then honestly answer this: Is Romney better?)
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To: GOPsterinMA

yes it does....

I was always curious .... but can we go back now. I like feeling powerful and successful.


7 posted on 09/24/2011 11:45:53 AM PDT by mike_9958
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To: Marie
On a positive note; I can now get half a steer for $150.

...and they only eat half as much. :-)

8 posted on 09/24/2011 11:55:05 AM PDT by Ramius (personally, I give us... one chance in three. More tea?)
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To: mike_9958

“I like feeling powerful and successful.”

AMEN to that brother!


9 posted on 09/24/2011 11:57:27 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (Don't like Perry? Then honestly answer this: Is Romney better?)
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To: GOPsterinMA

Hey Rob! Good to see you.

Tom


10 posted on 09/24/2011 12:09:43 PM PDT by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: unkus

Big T! How are you?


11 posted on 09/24/2011 12:11:04 PM PDT by GOPsterinMA (Don't like Perry? Then honestly answer this: Is Romney better?)
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To: trumandogz
naaa that was Rove and Bush

12 posted on 09/24/2011 12:26:11 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: Chode

Growing up during Carter, the thieves used to come into our neighborhood and take the copper From the roofs. They would strip the tar away.


13 posted on 09/24/2011 12:38:09 PM PDT by EQAndyBuzz (Sarahcuda in 2012. Nothing but Net!!!)
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To: trumandogz

Meanwhile here in Ohio,hay is cheap.Small square bales are 2.50 to 3.00.


14 posted on 09/24/2011 12:54:00 PM PDT by Farmer Dean (stop worrying about what they want to do to you,start thinking about what you want to do to them)
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To: EQAndyBuzz

Sounds bad and those thieves probably didn’t care how much it cost to repair those roofs. I read a story not long ago where thieves were stealing copper drain pipes from churches. There is also stories of a increase in wiring and plumbing bandits.


15 posted on 09/24/2011 1:00:22 PM PDT by pepperhead (Kennedys float, Mary Jos don't)
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To: Farmer Dean

“Meanwhile here in Ohio,hay is cheap.Small square bales are 2.50 to 3.00.”

Just goes to show how far this administration will go to hurt the farmers and ranchers across America.

He makes it rain too much in Ohio which causes a prices for hay to be low, thereby hurting the farmers.

In Texas, he makes it not rain for a year causing hay prices to skyrocket thereby hurting the ranchers.


16 posted on 09/24/2011 1:07:49 PM PDT by trumandogz
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To: trumandogz

How much would it cost to drive a semi to Ohio and load up maybe 900-1000 bales?


17 posted on 09/24/2011 1:15:46 PM PDT by Farmer Dean (stop worrying about what they want to do to you,start thinking about what you want to do to them)
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To: Farmer Dean

A rancher friend of mine paid a pretty price for hay that was driven down to Texas from somewhere in the midwest.

He is still having to sell off cattle.


18 posted on 09/24/2011 1:19:24 PM PDT by trumandogz
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To: Farmer Dean

Damn...here in Nevada I’ve got 5 horses to feed. Grass hay is costing me $18 a bale. Three wire bales that average about 125 lbs...


19 posted on 09/24/2011 1:30:22 PM PDT by Crapgame (What should be taught in our schools? American Exceptionalism, not cultural Marxism...)
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To: bkopto

Hay trading moderate to active in some areas
In Nebraska and the East River area of South Dakota, alfalfa was fully steady, grass $5 higher, dehydrated pellets in the Platte Valley steady to $10 higher, Northeast dehydrated pellets $5 higher, ground and delivered to feedlots fully steady. Good demand on all hay products, according to the USDA-Market News Service, Sept. 16.

Northeast: Premium alfalfa, in large squares, $180-$190; good, in large squares, $150-$165, few at $200, in large rounds, $120-$135; fair, in large squares, $135-$140. Alfalfa-grass mix, in large squares, $180. Good grass hay, in large squares, $95, in large rounds, $90-$95, in small squares, $150. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, $240-$245.

Platte Valley: Good/premium alfalfa, in large squares, $170-$200; fair/good, in large squares, $135-$145; fair/good, in large rounds, $110-$125; premium, in small squares, $195-$200. Premium grass, in large squares, $145-$150; good, in large squares, $110; good/premium, in large rounds few at $125. Alfalfa ground and delivered to feedlots, $160-$165. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, $250-$255.

East River area of South Dakota: Supreme alfalfa, in large squares, $190-$215, $225 delivered; good, in large squares, $150-$175, in large rounds, $170 delivered; fair, in large squares, $150. Utility, in large squares, $125, $135 delivered, in large rounds, $100 delivered. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 17% $221, 15% $205. Alfalfa meal, 17% $224. Premium mixed alfalfa-orchard grass, in large squares, $215. Premium mixed alfalfa-grass, in large squares, $180. Premium grass, in large squares, $150-$160, in large rounds, $170 delivered.

In Iowa, alfalfa sold steady. Good demand. Some contacts have started on fourth cutting.

South central-north central: Good/premium alfalfa, in large squares, $190-$200; fair/good, in large squares, $170-$180; good, in large rounds, $120; premium, in small squares, $220-$240. Premium alfalfa-grass mix, in small squares, $200-$220. Grass, in large squares, $120. Straw, in large squares, $110-$120.

Rock Valley: Supreme alfalfa, in large squares, 1 load $200, 2 loads $160, in large rounds, 9 loads $165-$190, 1 load $200; premium, in large rounds, 6 loads $135-$155; good, in large rounds, 1 load $110. Premium mixed alfalfa-grass, in large squares, 2 loads $125-$135, in large rounds, 2 loads $165-$170, 1 load $130; good, in large rounds, 2 loads, $107.50-$115. Premium grass, in small squares, 3 loads $175-$190, in large rounds, 15 loads $120-$135; good, in small squares, 2 loads $105-$115, in large squares, 1 load $115, in large rounds, 25 loads $97.50-$117.50; fair, in large rounds, 1 load $85. Straw, in large squares, 2 loads $102.50-$105, in large rounds, 4 loads $100-$107.50. Cornstalks, in large rounds, 2 loads $50-$55.

In Minnesota, all classes sold steady to firm.

Premium alfalfa, in large rounds, 1 load $142.50; good, in small squares, 1 load $102.50, in large rounds, 1 load $105. Premium alfalfa-grass mix, in large rounds, 2 loads $110-$117.50; good, in small squares, 1 load $82.50. Premium grass, in small squares, 1 load $112.50; good, in small squares, 3 loads $87.50-$105, in large squares, 1 load $102.50, in large rounds, 2 loads $80-$82.50; fair, in large rounds, 9 loads $67.50-$75. Utility, in large rounds, 13 loads $52.50-$62.50, 2 loads poor $40-$42.50. Straw, in large rounds, 1 load $34/bale.

In Montana, hay prices are steady to firm. Trade activity is moderate with majority of inventories, mostly large squares, continuing to moving out of state. Demand good to very good for all classes.

Premium/supreme alfalfa hay, in large squares, $155-$200, in small squares, $150-$175; good/premium, in large squares, $125-$150, in large rounds, $85-$100, in small squares, $125-$150; good/fair, in large rounds, $75-$90. Good/premium grass hay, in large squares, $120-$130, in large rounds, $85-$100, in small squares, $125-$155; good/fair, in large rounds, $75-$85. Good timothy hay, in small squares, $150-$180.

In Wyoming, western Nebraska, and western South Dakota, trade and movement fairly active. Demand very good with very good buying inquiry noted in all areas. Hay prices steady.

Eastern Wyoming: Premium/supreme new crop alfalfa, in large squares, $180-$205; good/premium, in large squares, $150-$190, in small squares, $140; Utility/fair, in large and medium squares, $130-$150. Good alfalfa-grass, in large squares, $120. Wheat hay, $60. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% percent protein, $180 delivered wholesale. Wheat straw, $55.

Central/western Wyoming: Supreme new crop alfalfa, in large squares, $250; premium, in large squares, $170, in small squares, $210; good, in large squares, $130-$150, western Wyoming $200 and fair, in small squares, $130; fair, $85-$105. Premium alfalfa-grass, in large squares, $175; good, $115-$120. Oat hay, $80-$120. Alfalfa cubes, $195.

Western Nebraska: Premium/supreme new crop alfalfa, in large squares, $200-$205; good, in large squares, $165-$180; fair, in large squares, $130-$160, in large rounds, $120 delivered; ground and delivered, $140. Wheat hay, in large rounds, $70. Wheat straw, $60-$65.

Western South Dakota: Premium new crop alfalfa, in medium and large squares, $100-$150; good, in medium squares, $85-$105, in large rounds, $80-$85; fair, in large rounds, $70. Premium alfalfa-grass, in medium squares, $125; good, in large rounds, $60-$70. Mixed grass, in large rounds, $65-$70. Crested wheat grass, in large rounds, $65.

In Colorado, all classes of hay continue to trade steady to mostly firm with good to very good demand.

Northeast: Premium/supreme alfalfa, in large squares, $200-$220, $210-$225 delivered; good/premium, $180-$200, $190-$210 delivered; fair/good, $160-$180, $185-$200 delivered; Utility/fair, $150-$160, $170-$185 delivered. Premium, in small squares, $235-$265; good, $200-$235; fair, $150-$180. Premium grass, in large squares, $180-$200, in small squares, $235-$265; good, $140-$165 delivered; good, $200-$235; fair, $165-$200. Premium alfalfa-grass, in small squares, $250-$265. Straw, in large squares, $60-$75, $80-$85 delivered. Oat, in large squares, $135. Millet, in large squares, $120-$135. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

Southeast: Premium/supreme alfalfa, in large squares, $230-$260; good, $210-$230; fair, $190-$210. Premium grass, in small squares, $230-$250. Straw, in large squares, $80-$90. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

San Luis Valley: Premium/supreme alfalfa, in large squares, $240-$260, instances $275; good/premium, $220-$240; fair/good, $190-$210. Premium, in small squares, $265-$290. Good grass, in large squares, $130-$150. Premium oat hay, in large squares, $180-$185. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

Southwest: Premium/supreme alfalfa, in large squares, $220-$250, in small squares, $230-$265; good, $190-$220. Premium grass in large squares, $170-$190, in small squares, $230-$260; good, $200-$230. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

Mountains/northwest: Premium alfalfa, in large squares, $180-$200; fair/good, $160-$180. Premium grass, in large squares, $170-$180, in small squares, $200-$230; good, $150-$170; good, $165-$180; fair/utility, in large rounds, $140-$150. No reported quotes for other classes of hay.

In Missouri, hay demand is light. Supply is moderate. Prices are steady.

Supreme alfalfa, RFV >185 $150-$190; premium alfalfa, RFV 170-180 $130-$170; fair/good alfalfa, RFV 130-170 $80-$120. Good mixed alfalfa-grass, $40-$80. Good/premium prairie hay, $80-$120; fair/good prairie hay, $40-$80. Good/premium brome, $100-$150; good brome, $80-$120. Fair brome mixed with grass, $35-$75. Good/premium mixed grass hay, $60-$100; good mixed grass hay, $40-$70; fair/good mixed grass hay, in large rounds, $20-$40/bale. Good bermuda grass, $80-$120. Premium/supreme timothy, in small squares, $4-$7/bale; good timothy hay, in small squares, $3-$6/bale. Wheat straw, in small squares, $2-$5/bale.

In Oklahoma, the hay trade is light to moderate, movement mostly moderate.

Central: Prices firm on all offerings. Premium alfalfa, in large squares, delivered, $270-$300; good/fair, in rounds delivered, $200-$230. Most hay sold based on RFV at mostly $1 to $1.10 per point plus delivery. Horse hay in small squares, $280-$330. Firm. Good bermuda grass hay, in large rounds, $100-$125. Prairie hay and other mixed grasses $90-$100. Eastern and east central mostly $90-$110. Good, Bermuda-bermuda mix, in small squares, $8-$9/bale.

Eastern: Prices firm. Premium alfalfa, in large squares, not tested; fair, in large rounds delivered, $200-$230, in small squares, $10-$12/bale. Good bermuda grass hay, in large rounds, $100-$120/ton. By the bale $65-$100 each mostly $70-$90. Some fair quality mixed grass offerings, $80-$90.

Western Oklahoma: No alfalfa sales confirmed. Western Oklahoma: No Grass hay sales confirmed, last week a few sales confirmed at $175-$180.

In Texas, hay prices are firm. Trade is moderate to active under good buyer demand.

Panhandle: Premium/supreme alfalfa, in small squares, delivered, $300-$350, $10-$11/bale, in large squares, delivered, $300-$350; good/premium, $270-$300, $8-$9/bale; good/premium, $270-$300; fair/good, $260-$270. Ground and delivered, north, $280-$295; south, $280-$310. Corn stover, delivered, in large bales, $140-$180. Grass hay, in large squares, delivered, $230-$266. Prairie, in large rounds, delivered, $170-$255. CRP grass hay, in large rounds and squares, delivered, $130-$140. Cotton burrs, delivered, $140. Cotton hulls, delivered, $280.

West: Premium/supreme alfalfa, in small squares, delivered, $300-$350, $9-$10/bale, in large squares, delivered, $300-$350; good/premium, $270-$300, $7-$9/bale; good/premium, $265-$300; fair/good, $260-$265.

North/central/east: Premium/supreme alfalfa, in small squares, delivered, $285-$330, $9-$11/bale, in large squares, delivered, $300-$350; good/premium, $265-$285, $7-$8/bale; good/premium, $260-$300. Good/premium coastal bermuda, in small squares, FOB, $250-$300, $8-$10/bale; good, $200-$250, $6-$8/bale. Good/premium, in large rounds, FOB, $170-$200, $85-$100/roll. Delivered, $230-$250.

South: Good/premium coastal bermuda, in small squares, FOB, $240-$270, $8-$9/bale; good, $210-$240, $5-$8/bale. Good/premium, in large rounds, FOB, $160-$170, $80-$85/roll; good, $120-$160, $60-$80/roll.

In New Mexico, alfalfa hay prices are firm. Trade is active, demand very good.

East region: Premium/supreme baled alfalfa, in large squares, $305-$320/ton delivered from out of state; good, delivered from out of state, $270-$290/ton. Feedlot Alfalfa, ground and delivered, $294-$315/ton.

Southeast: Premium/supreme baled alfalfa, in large squares, $270-$280/ton delivered to dairies; premium, spot loads $300/ton; good, $250-$260. Premium, in small bales, $285-$310/ton loaded on truck out of field. Premium/supreme out of barn, $315-$320.

South/southwest: Premium baled alfalfa, in large squares, $250-$275/ton delivered to dairies; good, $200-$220; fair, $180-$200; utility, $160/ton. Premium, in small bales, $8-$8.50/bale; premium/supreme, $280-$300/ton out of barn. Corn silage, $48-$50/ton net back to farmer at 70% moisture.

North central: Premium/supreme baled alfalfa, in large squares, $250-$270/ton delivered to dairies. Premium, in small bales, $8-$9/bale out of barn.


20 posted on 09/24/2011 1:42:10 PM PDT by Dust in the Wind (U S Troops Rock)
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To: Dust in the Wind
Previous post info;

High Plains Publishers, Inc.

High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171 1-

21 posted on 09/24/2011 1:46:32 PM PDT by Dust in the Wind (U S Troops Rock)
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To: Farmer Dean

“How much would it cost to drive a semi to Ohio and load up maybe 900-1000 bales?”

One of our Wisconsin farm newspapers just had an article about a group of farmers checking into doing this. Hay has gone up a little in this area but is still not to bad.


22 posted on 09/24/2011 2:09:07 PM PDT by WorldviewDad (following God instead of culture)
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