Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Yankees Abroad: John Saylesís surprisingly evenhanded new film on the Philippine-American War
City Journal ^ | 23 September 2011 | Ryan L. Cole

Posted on 10/14/2011 6:26:39 PM PDT by neverdem

Skeptics of America’s engagements in Afghanistan and Iraq have frequently drawn comparisons to Vietnam as a reminder of the futility of far-flung military interventions. Rarely do they mention the Philippines, the site of one of our first forays into nation-building. A recent film, however, uses that mostly forgotten war as a backdrop for a meditation on the wisdom of sending Americans abroad in search of monsters to destroy. Written and directed by John Sayles, Amigo, which arrived in a handful of American cities last month, is set in 1900 amid the three-year Philippine-American War.

In the spring of 1898, shortly after America’s declaration of war on Spain, Commodore George Dewey cruised into Manila Bay and defeated the Spanish fleet in a matter of hours. America, which had originally gone to war with the intention of saving Cuban rebels from Spanish savagery, had now netted a possession in the Pacific. President William McKinley subsequently redirected U.S. troops to the Philippines to provide “guidance to a better government” and establish “peace and order and security.”

Humorist Finley Peter Dunne made clear how unfamiliar the Philippines were to most Americans when he said, via his literary creation Mr. Dooley, that many were unsure “whether they were islands or canned goods.” And yet Americans went off by the thousands to this distant land to accomplish McKinley’s goals and, in the process, fight Filipino revolutionaries led by Emilio Aguinaldo, self-appointed president and would-be George Washington of the First Philippines Republic—an insurgent government determined to force the Americans off the islands.

Amigo offers an account of this period, told from the perspectives of the American soldiers, the Filipino revolutionaries, and the ordinary citizens affected by the conflict. The story, set in the barrio of San Isidro in the largest of the country’s 7,107 islands, Luzon, centers on village leader Rafael Dacanay (Joel Torre). When the Americans arrive in the rural rice-farming community, they quickly rely on Dacanay, whose brother and son have joined the rebels, as a conduit and guide. As the story unfolds, Dacanay struggles to maintain a balance between the Americans, and their goal of establishing an embryonic form of democracy in the village, and the insurrectos, who, following Aguinaldo’s orders, wage guerrilla warfare against the occupying Yankees. Matters are further complicated by an imperious Spanish priest with murky motives and by Dacanay’s treacherous brother-in law, who, while covertly conspiring with the rebels, unfairly accuses Dacanay of doing the Americans’ bidding.

Sayles uses Dacanay’s dilemma to present empathetic portraits of all involved. The young American soldiers, led by the amiable, architecture-loving Lieutenant Compton (Garret Dillahunt), are indeed strangers in a strange land. But they’re also earnest, well-intentioned, and humane. The usual Hollywood stereotypes are avoided. Their Filipino adversaries, hiding and plotting in caves or in the jungle while awaiting instructions from Aguinaldo, are not celebrated or deified but portrayed neutrally. Caught in the middle are the villagers, who gradually begin to bond with the Americans without necessarily losing sympathy for the rebels’ cause. A U.S.–Filipino cast employ their respective native languages (English would become the second official language of the Philippines later in the twentieth century), adding a sense of realism to the proceedings.

These intersections make for a relatively agenda-free film on a loaded subject. This is surprising, given that Sayles was a vocal critic of the Iraq War and has directed a number of left-leaning films, including the quickly forgotten Silver City, a satiric bashing of President George W. Bush. True, as the Americans’ strategy evolves, and the pitiless Colonel Hardacre (Chris Cooper), one of the few cartoonish figures here, takes the reins in San Isidro, the tone grows darker at the occupiers’ expense. One scene shows Dacanay being subjected to the “water cure”—a coercion method used during the war that will, of course, remind viewers of waterboarding. It’s worth pointing out, too, that the movie does not quite capture the full reciprocal brutality of the conflict. Consider the Balangiga Affair, in which rebels massacred 40 unarmed Americans on the island of Samar and subsequently generated a ferocious U.S. response. But for the most part, Amigo is a compelling and mostly impartial piece of historical fiction.

It is also a timely one. American troops have been bravely fighting terrorists and encouraging democracy in both Iraq and Afghanistan for nearly a decade. But increasingly, many Americans, of all political orientations, question our foreign commitments and wonder if the costs are commensurate with the benefits.

Some history not included in Amigo is also worth considering. After the rebellion ended in the first years of the new century and William Howard Taft was appointed governor of the Philippines, Americans advanced the archipelago’s infrastructure, public education, and health services, vastly improving the quality of life for its occupants. And though independence would not come until 1946, the Philippines would eventually emerge as a sovereign nation. A partial snapshot of the cost: over 4,000 Americans lost their lives. The cumulative toll for the Filipinos is believed to have been in the hundreds of thousands. Though the history that Amigo depicts in no way makes for a direct comparison to our current wars, the film nevertheless provokes a welcome consideration of America’s complicated role abroad.

Ryan L. Cole writes on politics and culture from Indianapolis.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Politics/Elections; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: amigo; johnsayles; philippines

1 posted on 10/14/2011 6:26:44 PM PDT by neverdem
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: neverdem

Wasn’t that the Spanish-American War and the Philippines went from being a Spain colony to an American semi-colony. I bet they still think the US was far better as a suitor than Spain too.


2 posted on 10/14/2011 6:45:16 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: neverdem
Americans advanced the archipelago’s infrastructure, public education, and health services, vastly improving the quality of life for its occupants.

I worked with a physician several years ago who was from the Philippines. He told me "we like America and Americans. When Spain owned our country, they kept the native people down. When the Americans came in, they built schools and educated people; they built hospitals. America did a lot for my country."

He was very sincere in his statement.

3 posted on 10/14/2011 6:46:47 PM PDT by susannah59
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: susannah59

Bookmark


4 posted on 10/14/2011 6:57:17 PM PDT by Publius6961 (My world was lovely, until it was taken over by parasites.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

off topic but I lived in an apartment in Hoboken in the 90s that John Sayles once lived in. I would get some of his mail, including an invite to a private premiere of a remastered version of El Cid hosted by Martin Scorsese at the Joseph Papp theatre. I took the invite and went with my brother. Sat in the theatre with Charlton Heston, Sohpia Loren, Marissa Tomei, Martin, John Tutorro and others. Drank free wine. It was great. True story.


5 posted on 10/14/2011 7:13:00 PM PDT by No Left Turn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

First off, it’s not ‘amigo”, Every Filipino I know are absolutely pissed that even they are looked upon as the “mexicans from Asia”.

No one speaks Spanish in the Philippines.

It just happens that they were occupied by the Spaniards for 300 plus years yet rebelled against the occupiers by speaking the native tongue of Tagalog as an FU to the Spanish. Unfortunately, thru those hundreds of years...spanish words just crept into the tagalog language like “coche” or “mesa”.

My best bud in my circle is a rarity: Filipino, right-wing and works for Conservative Club for Growth. He detests mexicans who starts speaking to him in Spanish...and he blasts them with Tagalog expletives in return.


6 posted on 10/14/2011 7:18:47 PM PDT by max americana (FUBO NATION 2012 FK BARAK)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

This is timely. This Iranian “plot” reminds me of “Remember The Maine!”.

Sounds like a good movie. My fave historical figure is Douglass MacArthur. I believe he is still revered there.


7 posted on 10/14/2011 7:26:45 PM PDT by Forgotten Amendments (Days .... Weeks ..... Months .....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

More to the point, in Army History magazine there is a very good article (Issue 79, Spring 2011), about the very hard men who were General Pershing’s subordinates, in the article The Violent End of the Insurgency on Samar 1901-1902.

http://www.history.army.mil/armyhistory/AH79%28W%29r.pdf

(The pdf is for the full magazine so takes a while to load, but is well worth it.)

It should be noted that they took full advantage of General Orders 100, aka The Lieber Code, drafted during the US Civil War.

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/lieber.asp

“In the event of the violation of the laws of war by an enemy, the Code permitted reprisals against the enemy’s recently captured POWs; it permitted the summary battlefield punishment of spies, saboteurs, francs-tireurs, and guerrilla forces, if caught in the act of carrying out their missions. (These allowable practices were later abolished by the Third and Fourth Geneva Conventions of 1949.)”


8 posted on 10/14/2011 7:30:40 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

There’s a great book on our nation building effort in the Philippines titled In Our Own Image. It has quite a bit of info on the Insurrection.


9 posted on 10/14/2011 7:36:08 PM PDT by MadJack ("Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet." (Afghan proverb))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Interesting looking film. After the fighting the Moros, the US looked to ditch the .38 revolver and adopted...wait, what was that they adopted?


10 posted on 10/14/2011 7:45:38 PM PDT by M1911A1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: neverdem
It led to this, designed to stop drug crazed muslim fanatics, the Moros, with a single shot
.
11 posted on 10/14/2011 7:49:52 PM PDT by Waverunner (I'd like to welcome our new overlords, say hello to my little friend)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL
Wasn’t that the Spanish-American War and the Philippines went from being a Spain colony to an American semi-colony. I bet they still think the US was far better as a suitor than Spain too.

The film concerns the Philippine Insurrection (1899-1902), which occurred following the Spanish-American War. From 1902 to 1917, American soldiers also battled Muslim extremists in a separate conflict, the Moro War, on the island of Mindanao. This conflict, arguably America's longest, has been largely forgotten today.

12 posted on 10/14/2011 7:52:48 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

Once the Philipines became US territory in the Spanish-American War, we fought a very brutal insurrection described in the post. Our victory in that war opened the door to US-style colonialism, which laid the foundation for that country’s development, which Philipinos remember culturally. We then shared the horror of WWII as allies - forgotton allies to a large degree. Our bond with the Philipino people is something Americans should be proud of.

Whenever I hear someone repeat the WWII canard that those islands in Alaska and Guam were the only US territory taken by the Japanese, I remind them about the Philipines


13 posted on 10/14/2011 7:53:21 PM PDT by Owl558 ("Those who remember George Satayana are doomed to repeat him")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill

Isn’t Mindanao pretty much Islamic these days?


14 posted on 10/14/2011 7:57:14 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: max americana

I was in an auto parts store last month where a couple of Hmong were attempting explain in English what they needed. A Mexican store regular walked in and the clerk asked him to interpret.

The Hmong was pissed to be confused as Latin and said in a loud voice, “WE ARE NOT SPANISH”.


15 posted on 10/14/2011 7:57:38 PM PDT by Rebelbase (Cain/Rubio?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Rebelbase

My friend runs a jewelry store online and has 1-800 line. Sometimes, his staff don;t show up si he handles the calls himself on occasion. You won’t believe the number of calls he takes where the caller in normal English asks..for Spanish-speaking agents. He already took out the “press 1 for English” option and these clowns still ask for it.


16 posted on 10/14/2011 8:09:01 PM PDT by max americana (FUBO NATION 2012 FK BARAK)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

Well, I hope they show the muslims all hopped up and drugged out charging our forces and being shot numerous times by our Navy .38 caliber revolvers...and how that led to the need to develop the M1911 .45!

The .38’s didnt STOP them at all! Or at least, not until you hit the target multiple times


17 posted on 10/14/2011 8:10:54 PM PDT by RaceBannon (Ron Paul is to the Constitution what Fred Phelps is to the Bible.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

We actually fought the muslims then, and DID NOT lose the war before it was over by allowing the Filipinos to write a constitution installing Islam as the State Religion. This was done in Iraq and Afghanistan under the Bush administration’s watch!


18 posted on 10/14/2011 8:12:06 PM PDT by noprogs (Borders, Language, Culture....all should be preserved)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: susannah59
"When the Americans came in, they built schools and educated people; they built hospitals. America did a lot for my country."

I am married to a Philipina. She told me the Spanish gave the Philippines religion. The Americans gave them education.

19 posted on 10/14/2011 8:28:30 PM PDT by NYFreeper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

It is fair to point out that the alternative to American conquest and rule was not independence, it was rule by some other colonial power.

This was the high tide of colonialism, and no attractive territory occupied by brown people would have been allowed to go free.

Most likely it would have been the Germans moving in, as they were the most aggressive at the time, being late out of the gate in the colony race and desperate to catch up.


20 posted on 10/14/2011 8:42:51 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: No Left Turn

Dude. That is an EPIC tale. Cyber high five.


21 posted on 10/14/2011 9:06:18 PM PDT by MattinNJ (Newt. The antidote to Romney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: neverdem

Must have been tough to be a Marine doing tour over there with a bunch of impoverished Michelle Malkins running around. I’m not sayng, I’m just saying.


22 posted on 10/14/2011 9:07:56 PM PDT by MattinNJ (Newt. The antidote to Romney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

They were warned by the Spanish that Americans would not accept their Roman Catholicism; they were right. We have sodomites in our military; they don’t. They are also allowed to pray in school; we pray to Mother Earth and global warming. The Filipinos were right to reject us; they are inheriting the earth. Now they work in my home state of NJ, having families while Americans buy new cars instead of having children. They are very “Irish” (no apostles sent, receiving the Word second- or third- hand) and living like the early Jewish followers of Christ (persecution & all).


23 posted on 10/14/2011 10:07:07 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: max americana

As a Catholic I must say that Filipinos are as Catholic as Mexicans, in a good way; we Americans never had the Virgin of Guadalupe appear, and it shows. Tagalog doesn’t have a word for “gay marriage”, because they are God’s people; their war against Moros on Mindanao reinforces their beliefs, while we believe Islam is compatible with our way of life.

I’m not Filipino, but I understand why God lets them spread around the globe; they deserve it, and suffer for it.


24 posted on 10/14/2011 10:11:26 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: NYFreeper

“She told me the Spanish gave the Philippines religion. The Americans gave them education.”

Which was the better of the 2? The Filipinos have made it clear which was more important for them; if they were an American state they’d be required to let perverts in their military & government. No matter what they think of Spain in hindsight, Spain (at the time) was Catholic; what else matters?


25 posted on 10/14/2011 10:14:53 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

My wife is from Mindano: Overall Mindano is mostly Christian, with both Catholics and Protestants well represented. Only in certain parts of Mindano are Muslims in the majority (and of course those areas are where most of the armed-conflict type trouble is.)


26 posted on 10/14/2011 10:21:20 PM PDT by Paul R. (We are in a break in an Ice Age. A brief break at that...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: max americana

Here in NJ you can’t get a “customer service job” (bank teller, cashier, telemarketer, etc.) without speaking Spanish, Portuguese, or Ordu; the empire has already fallen. Americans need not apply (so they are leaving); before the “bully” Christie arrived, his DEM predecessor admitted that without ILLEGAL immigration NJ had lost population. Whatever you think of Christie, he wants the state to be a place where AMERICANS (besides cops & schoolteachers) can live...


27 posted on 10/14/2011 10:21:23 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Sherman Logan

Ethiopia & Liberia were free; when enough of the brown people picked up guns, they all became free.


28 posted on 10/14/2011 10:23:26 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: No Left Turn

LOL!


29 posted on 10/14/2011 10:35:00 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: neverdem; Travis McGee; Pelham

Race baiting pc vomit alert posting on this thread...just sayin


30 posted on 10/15/2011 1:00:35 AM PDT by wardaddy (we have entered whatever land here on FR..maybe we will find our bearing again some day)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Paul R.

Does your wife have a sister? :p


31 posted on 10/15/2011 12:33:15 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: kearnyirish2
Which was the better of the 2?

Well since they already had religion, the Americans didn't need to give it to them so therefore we gave them the next best thing. Are you saying that since they had religion under the Spanish, that's all they needed and they were better off with them than under the Americans?

32 posted on 10/15/2011 11:16:25 PM PDT by NYFreeper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; ColdOne; Convert from ECUSA; ...

Thanks neverdem.


33 posted on 10/16/2011 6:01:43 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: NYFreeper

“Are you saying that since they had religion under the Spanish, that’s all they needed and they were better off with them than under the Americans?”

As a Roman Catholic faith supersedes all else; we certainly contributed much to the Philippines, but not that. Americans have a different version of history than Filipinos do. Their initial “independence” celebration they held when Spain left was the only one they had for decades. They fought us as they had fought Spain. Spain has left an indelible mark on the Filipinos in terms of language, faith, and culture; today the Philippines bears little resemblance to the United States.


34 posted on 10/16/2011 7:01:06 AM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: kearnyirish2
while we believe Islam is compatible with our way of life.

Just who is this "we"? Zero and the Bushies may, but certainly no FReepers or non-FReepers that I know of.

35 posted on 10/16/2011 7:47:12 AM PDT by metesky (Brethren, leave us go amongst them! - Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond, The Searchers)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: metesky

“Zero and the Bushies may, but certainly no FReepers or non-FReepers that I know of.”

True; I should have been more specific. The “people who determine which foreigners can move next door to me” believe Islam is compatible with our way of life.


36 posted on 10/16/2011 8:09:18 AM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: kearnyirish2
As a Roman Catholic faith supersedes all else;

As a Roman Catholic, I also agree that that faith supersedes all else. Faith should be first in life, but it is not a panacea for all of life's challenges.

today the Philippines bears little resemblance to the United States.

I would disagree, it bears a good deal of resemblance to the US. They may be ahead of us in the faith department, but don't sell the US short. Contrary to what you see in the MSM, liberals that worship "mother earth" are a very small minority here. It was never the intention of the US to make the Philippines into a carbon copy of the US or a US state for that matter. The Philippines today is a dynamic republic that practices democracy pretty well. It has a well developed education system, a vibrant economy, and very little socialism. The US certainly deserves some credit for this. The Philippines is still a trusted ally and the US is still respected there.

37 posted on 10/16/2011 9:07:16 PM PDT by NYFreeper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: NYFreeper

“Contrary to what you see in the MSM, liberals that worship “mother earth” are a very small minority here.”

Whatever you want to call them, we have a lot of people that support legalized abortion, and a significant number (though not near a majority) that support “gay marriage”. Some would kindly say they worship mother earth; others would rightly say they worship the Devil. Whether you want to connect it to faith or not, the American family has been under assault (successfully) for decades; I don’t see this antipathy in Filipinos.


38 posted on 10/17/2011 4:10:01 AM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: kearnyirish2
we have a lot of people that support legalized abortion,

Yes, that is one of our biggest problems. I lot of people don't know it, but they are indirectly worshiping the devil by doing this.

I see we also share a common heritage. I'm happy that at least Ireland still outlaws abortions.

39 posted on 10/17/2011 4:14:40 PM PDT by NYFreeper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Owl558

Our bond with the Philipino people is something Americans should be proud of.


I agree...but i am seriously biased ;)


40 posted on 10/17/2011 5:03:22 PM PDT by chasio649
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: NYFreeper

Ireland is under a lot of pressure to change that from the EU; they really made a deal with the Devil when they took EU money to modernize their infrastructure. Most of the economic benefits of that have already melted away, and now they’ve sacrificed some independence for nothing. 20 years ago divorce was against the law there; I hope they don’t relent on the abortion question in the same manner.

Erin go bragh; be well.


41 posted on 10/18/2011 2:22:05 AM PDT by kearnyirish2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

Hahaha - well, all the sisters are married, but she has half-sisters and nieces who are looking. (When I was in Cebu a couple of the nieces wanted to know if I had a brother!!!)

:-)

(I know you are joking, but my reply is the same either way!)


42 posted on 10/18/2011 10:33:43 PM PDT by Paul R. (We are in a break in an Ice Age. A brief break at that...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: chasio649

Ditto that!


43 posted on 10/18/2011 10:35:55 PM PDT by Paul R. (We are in a break in an Ice Age. A brief break at that...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson