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British fleet suffers defeat at Fort Mifflin, Pennsylvania
History.com, US Naval & US Army Archives, Penn State U. Library, FortMifflin.us, ^

Posted on 10/23/2011 9:12:51 PM PDT by bd476

This Day in History 234 Years Ago


October 23, 1777


British fleet suffers defeat at Fort Mifflin, Pennsylvania



On this day in 1777, a British Royal Navy fleet of ships, trying to open up supply lines along the Delaware River and the occupying British army in Philadelphia, is bombarded by American cannon fire and artillery from Fort Mifflin, Pennsylvania.

Six British ships were severely damaged, including the 64-gun battleship HMS Augusta and the 20-gun sloop Merlin, which both suffered direct hits before they were run aground and subsequently destroyed. More than 60 British troops aboard the Augusta were killed, while the crewmembers aboard the Merlin abandoned ship, narrowly avoiding a similar fate.

Although the American forces defending Fort Mifflin were undoubtedly victorious on October 23, 1777, the battle continued throughout the month of October and into November. With much of the fort destroyed and under continuous artillery and cannon fire, the American forces abandoned Fort Mifflin on November 16, 1777.

The capture of Fort Mifflin gave the British Royal Navy near complete control of the Delaware River up to Red Bank, New Jersey. Fearing that the fall of Fort Mercer, located across the Delaware from Fort Mifflin, was imminent, Continental Army Colonel Christopher Greene ordered a full retreat off all Patriot troops from the fort and the burning of all buildings and ships to prevent their capture by the British.

General Charles Cornwallis took over the evacuated fort, guaranteeing a safe winter for the British forces occupying Philadelphia, while their disheartened Continental counterparts froze at Valley Forge.

British fleet suffers defeat at Fort Mifflin, Pennsylvania


~ ~ ~ ~ ~




During the Revolutionary War the garrison at Fort Mifflin was ordered by General George Washington to hold off the British Navy so the Continental Army could make its way to their winter encampment at Valley Forge. Washington wrote that the defense of the Delaware River was "of the utmost importance to America."

Fort Mifflin


~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Mifflin: The Fort That Saved America



By Andrew M. Coker, Fall 2009


Positioned on the muddy west bank of the Delaware River, a historic structure still stands after more than 250 years. Located on Mud Island, just outside Philadelphia, Fort Mifflin has played a role in almost every war the United States has fought since the Revolution. Fort Mifflin was of great importance to George Washington and the Continental Army when the fort delayed British troops from proceeding down the frigid Delaware River in the cold month of November 1777.

This allowed Washington and his army to relocate and reassemble at Valley Forge, a key moment in the development of this fledging army. Later in the war the fort suffered the biggest bombardment the North American continent has ever witnessed, yet it remains intact and accessible to this day.

Despite a long and rich history as Philadelphia’s, and the nation’s, protector, Fort Mifflin remains one of the largely unknown and unacknowledged military sites in the United States.

Although Fort Mifflin was not constructed until 1771, plans for a fort on the Delaware to provide security began to unfold in 1626.

The Swedish, Dutch and British all fortified the Delaware River from 1626 to 1774 and found a key defense point where the Delaware converged with the Schuylkill River near Mud Island. In 1626, the Dutch built Fort Nassau on the east bank of the Delaware River, which allowed them to exploit fur trade in the region. The Dutch controlled the Delaware with multiple forts until the 1660s. When the British took over the Delaware, the Dutch were forced to leave.

Fort Mifflin was built by the British in 1771 to strengthen the colony’s control over the Delaware River. Construction stopped after the south side wall was finished in 1773.

In 1776, when the American colonies separated from England, the Americans continued construction of the fort in order to prevent the British from sailing ships to Philadelphia, the nation’s capital at the time.

Washington relied on the Pennsylvania Navy to guard Fort Mifflin and nearby Fort Mercer from the British. He had such faith in this operation that he reportedly told Navy Commodore John Hazelwood, “I have not the least doubt but we shall by our operations by land and water oblige the enemy to abandon Philadelphia . . .”

Mifflin: The Fort That Saved America


~ ~ ~ ~ ~




The Ships Who Slowed Down the
British on the Delaware River



Action of 23 October 1777, in the Delaware River



Pennsylvania Navy Fire Sloop Aetna was in service by the spring of 1776. On 26 March 1776, William Gamble was appointed as her Captain. On 2 May 1776 Gamble was supposed to be in command of a guard boat, fitting out to cruise in the Cape May [New Jersey] channel. This may have been a temporary assignment for Gamble, or the Aetna may have been the “guard boat.”

When the British sent a naval force into the Delaware River, the Aetna was sent down to participate in the battle of 7/8 May.

Her crew was fleshed out with four volunteers under Third Lieutenant Greenway of the Pennsylvania Navy Ship Montgomery.

On 28 May the Pennsylvania Council of Safety fixed the crew and pay rates for the fire sloop: she was to have a captain (at $26.67 per months, plus three sets of rations), a lieutenant (at $18 per month plus two sets of rations), and two sailors (at $7 per month with a $4 enlistment bounty).

Following the river battle the Council of Safety appointed Samuel Davison as Commodore of the Pennsylvania Navy. This decision was not accepted by various captains and a confrontation occurred before 20 July 1776.

Gamble was among those who refused Davison's orders, and Gamble “swore the would fetch fire sloop & the Galleys & Blow the Ship to the Divel.”

The ship in question was Davison's flagship, the Montgomery. On 24 June 1776, Gamble, among others, signed a statement denying there had been any hostile actions on anyone's part.

Aetna was reported as having a crew of four on 1 July 1776, and again on 1 August 1776.

On 19 October 1776, Gamble offered his resignation to the Council of Safety, angered that several promotions had ocurred without his being included. The Council accepted his resignation and appointed John Brice to replace him.

On 1 January 1777 Aetna's crew was reported as two officers and seven sailors, one of whom was on leave. Brice was promoted to the Pennsylvania Navy Fire Brig Volcano on 11 March 1777.

The Council of Safety selected William Clark to succeed Brice, and he was appointed and commissioned by the Executive Council on 5 April 1777.

The promotion was announced to Commodore Hazelwood on 9 April.

Aetna was one of many Continental and Pennsylvania Navy vessels sent down the Delaware River to oppose the British invasion in the late summer of 1777.

On 19 September 1777 she was at Marcus Hook, Delaware with the combined fleet.14 When Philadelphia fell to the British the fire sloop was among those cut off below the city.

Comet was present in the American fleet on the morning of 23 October 1777, during the engagement with the British fleet. Commodore Hazelwood, about 0800 launched three or four fire vessels toward the stricken Augusta.

Roebuck described the attackers as two brigs and a “skiff.” The two brigs were two of the three brigs available (Comet, Hellcat, and Volcano) and the “skiff” was probably the sloop Aetna.

Scarcely had the vessels raised sail to come down the river than all gunfire from the British fleet was directed on them. “ . . . their shot flew so thick around them and indeed cut their rigging so much that the crews got frightened and set them on Fire . . .” to soon.

The men quickly evacuated the burning vessels. The British boats closed in on the burning fire vessels, and managed to tow them ashore. All were destroyed without loss to the British.

Clark was cashiered on 13 January 1778.

American War of Independence at Sea: Pennsylvania Fire Sloop Aetna

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


FORT MIFFLIN - Pennsylvania (1771)



Fortifications on Mud Island, site of Fort Mifflin, predate the Revolutionary War. The island is in the Delaware River, seven miles below Philadelphia. The British started building the first works, known locally as Mud Fort, in 1771. A British bombardment destroyed the first fort, occupied by Patriot forces, in 1777.

In 1795 a new fort erected on the site was named in honor of Pennsylvania's first governor, Maj. Gen. Thomas Mifflin of the Continental Army. In 1798 work began on a new masonry structure to replace the older works, and the new fort was completed two years later.

The post was abandoned and reoccupied several times during the nineteenth century. Fort Mifflin was garrisoned during the Civil War, and Eastman was in command when the war ended. As the Army reduced its force structure at the end of the war, the post's garrison grew considerably smaller.

The 1875 Surgeon General's report on hygiene noted that although the post had quarters for "one company of artillery," the facility was "in charge of an ordnance-sergeant."

Fort Mifflin became a National Historic Landmark in 1915. During World War I the post was used to store munitions, and its final contribution to national defense was to host an antiaircraft battery during World War II.

History Army.mil





Note: in the following excerpt from the 1902 Biography, Commodore John Hazelwood's name is spelled Hazlewood by the biographer Josiah Granville Leach, Esq. I have left the author's spelling intact.






THE PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY.



YOL. XXYI. 1902. No. 1.

COMMODORE JOHN HAZLEWOOD, COMMANDER OF THE PENNSYLVANIA NAVY IN THE REVOLUTION.


BY JOSIAH GRANVILLE LEACH, ESQ.



John Hazlewood, one of the most noted naval officers of Pennsylvania in the Revolutionary War, was born in Eng- land about 1726, and became a mariner, and in early life settled in Philadelphia. In 1753 he was in command of the ship " Susanna and Molly;" in 1762, of the ship " Grey- hound ;" in 1763, of the brig " Monckton ;" in 1771, of the ship "Sally;" and in 1774, of the ship "Rebecca." The latter was one of the largest ships sailing at that time from Philadelphia, and in all of these Captain Hazlewood traded with foreign ports, chiefly those of England.




"When, at the outbreak of the Revolution, it became necessary to organize naval forces for the defence of the Colonies, recourse was had for naval commanders to the captains in the merchant marine, there being none others at hand whose training in any way fitted them for such service.

Philadelphia was ex- ceptionally fortunate at this period in having among her citizens many sea-captains of large experience, and she fur- nished for service in that great struggle a number of men who made records that would have done honor to the most thoroughly trained officers in the best naval forces of the
VOL. xxvi. 1 ( 1 )

2 Commodore John Hazlevood.

world. Of such may be mentioned Stephen Decatur, Thomas Truxton, Charles Biddle, Nicholas Biddle, John Barry, and John Hazlewood.

Commodore Hazlewood's earliest known service in the Revolution was in 1775. In July of that year the Pennsyl- vania Committee of Safety adopted measures for the defence of the Delaware River.

The naval part of the defence was the construction of war-ships, floating batteries, and fire- rafts, and the sinking of obstructions in the river, known as chevaux-de-frise.

By December 28 ten fire-rafts had been constructed, and Captain Hazlewood was appointed com- mander over the fleet of rafts. In May following he was selected by the Council of Safety " to survey the river from Billingsport to Fort Island," and also " to Survey the Chan- nel on the East side of the Barr opposite to Fort Island," and in June he was ordered to " construct and immediately employ persons for building an additional Guard Boat for the use of this Province," and on the 21st of that month the Council of Safety

Resolved, That John Hazelwood, Esq'r, be appointed Captain and superintendant of the Fire Vessels & Fire Rafts, and to the Guard Boats, and that he be allowed for his Services 36 Dollars p month & 4 Rations, to commence the day of his first appointment, being the 28th of December last.


In July, 1776, he was one of the " committee" of three sent to Poughkeepsie, New York, to devise plans for the obstruc- tion of the navigation of the North River by fire-vessels similar to those in use on the Delaware, and the " Secret Committee" mentions that Captain Hazlewood had " fitted out a fire vessel in a martial manner," while the Convention of the Representatives of the State of New York voted him the thanks of that body and the sum of three hundred dol- lars for services rendered in this direction, and on October 10, 1776, the Continental Congress recognized the impor- tance of this service by voting him and the two other mem- bers of his committee pay for preparing six sail of fire

Commodore John Hazlewood. 3

ships at New York." At a later date, precisely when is not known, he was promoted to commodore in the Pennsyl- vania navy, and he is so styled in the proceedings of the Supreme Executive Council, August 26, 1777, when the Naval Board recommended to the Council that they make Commodore Hazlewood " an extra allowance for his great trouble and extra attention" in " attending and directing fire ships and rafts," to which the Council responded by or- dering that he be paid one hundred pounds for his " extra service," etc.

Eleven days later the Council bore strong tes- timony to the eminent fitness of Commodore Hazlewood for the highest rank in its navy by placing him in actual com- mand of the naval force of the State. Howe's army was at this time advancing into Pennsylvania and his fleet was expected up the Delaware, and the Council

Ordered, That on the present emergency, when the Enemies' Army endeavouring to penetrate to this City, may be aided by a Fleet in the Delaware, the actual Command of the Naval force be committed to John Hazlewood, Esq'r, as Commodore in this Department, on account of the Age & infirmities of Tho's Seymour, Esq'r, his superior Officer, as it is manifest to Council that Commodore Seymour, in the present State of his Health, cannot be capable of that vigour & activity which are essen- tial to the service at this time of danger, in which the most strenuous efforts of the stoutest will be necessary.


On the day this appointment was made the Council in- formed the State Navy Board of their action in the follow- ing words :

As Council cannot justify to themselves or to the State, that the actual command of the naval force should continue in the hands of Commodore Seymour, whose health is very uncertain and whose age is far advanced, they have resolved to commit the real command of the same to Commodore Hazlewood, as you will find by a copy of the resolve inclosed.




Note: Commondore Hazelwood's strong response to British Lord Howe's offer of pardon if Hazelwood would surrender the Pennsylvania fleet, earned Hazelwood worthy commendation from Congress.





Five days later the battle of Brandywine was fought, and on the 26th of that month (September) the British entered Philadelphia.

A portion of the British fleet entered the Delaware, and shortly afterwards Lord Howe sent a flag to

4 Commodore John Hazleioood.

Commodore Hazlewood, demanding a surrender of the Pennsylvania fleet, promising his Majesty's pardon should he comply with the demand.

The commodore replied that he would not give up the fleet, but would defend it to the last, which reply came to the attention of Congress, and that body, on October 17, adopted the following resolution :

Resolved, That Congress highly approve of the brave and spirited con- duct of Commodore Hazlewood, and the other officers and men concerned in the defence of the river Delaware, and of their undaunted perseverance and resolution to maintain that pass to the City of Philadelphia to the utmost extremity.


On October 22 a British land force, under Count Dunop, made an attack on Fort Mercer, at Red Bank, and at the first sound of the count's cannon, the British fleet, consist- ing of the "Augusta," a new sixty-four-gun vessel, the " Roebuck," forty-four guns, the " Merlin" frigate, the " Liv- erpool," and several other vessels, attempted to make its way up the river to assist the attack. The fleet under Commo- dore Hazlewood immediately engaged these vessels and drove them back.

Going down the river, the " Augusta" and " Merlin" ran aground, hearing of which, the commodore hoisted signal to engage, and the action soon became gen- eral. The " Augusta" took fire and blew up and the " Merlin" was burned by her crew. Congress took early notice of this event, and honored the commodore with a sword for his gallant conduct, as appears from its vote of November 4, 1777" :

Resolved, That Congress have an high sense of the merit of Commo- dore Hazlewood, commander of the naval force in the Delaware river, in the service of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and of the officers and men under his command, in their late gallant defence of their coun- try against the British fleet, whereby two of their men of war were de- stroyed, and four others compelled to retire ; and that an elegant sword be provided by the marine committee, and presented to Commodore Hazlewood.


A land attack by the British for the reduction of Fort Miiflin soon followed, during which the fleet was actively

Commodore John Hazlewood. 5

engaged, losing in one day thirty-eight men killed and wounded. The fort was captured on November 16 and on the 18th a council of war convened by General Washing- ton was held on one of the commodore's ships, at which Major-General Arthur St. Glair, Major-General Baron de Kalb, and Brigadier-General Henry Knox recommended that the commodore " with the first favorable wind to at- tempt passing up the River past the City of Philadelphia to such place as he judge proper."

This was accomplished on the night of the 21st, when twelve armed boats, thirteen galleys, province sloop, ammunition sloop, convention brig and accommodation sloop, one provision sloop, two flats with stores, and one schooner passed the city without hav- ing a shot fired at them, and took refuge in the Delaware above Burlington.

The history of this fleet from this time forward is briefly told in the " Pennsylvania Archives," Second Series, Vol. I. pp. 235, 236, and an interesting ac- count of its previous service and engagements, after the British came up the Delaware, is told in a letter from Com- modore Hazlewood to President Thomas Wharton, Jr., under date of December 1, 1777, printed in the "Pennsyl- vania Archives," Second Series, Yol. VI. pp. 47-50.

In August, 1778, the Assembly of Pennsylvania determined that a large State navy was unnecessary, and recommended that the greater part of the same be disbanded.

Such dis- bandment followed, and Commodore Hazlewood he being the last to hold that rank and many others officers were discharged.

In the summer of 1779 Commodore Hazlewood was one of the committee of citizens chosen at a public meeting in Philadelphia to raise, by house-to-house subscription, money for the support of the army.

In 1780 he was appointed Commissary of Purchases for the Continental army, in the city of Philadelphia, an office of great trust, involving the handling of large sums of money. On one occasion (Sep- tember 7, 1780) the Supreme Executive Council ordered that an order be drawn in his favor for one hundred thou-

6 Commodore John Hazlewood.

sand pounds for purchasing supplies. In December of the same year he was appointed Receiver of Provisions for the Pennsylvania militia.

Of Commodore Hazlewood's life subsequent to the war but little is known, except that April 11, 1785, he was chosen one of the port wardens of Philadelphia. In 1772 he was one of the founders of the St. George Society, and from 1779 until 1783 was a vestryman of Christ Church. He died at Philadelphia on the 1st or 2d of March, 1800, aged seventy-four, and was buried on the 3d of that month in the graveyard of St. Peter's Church...

http://www.archive.org/stream/pennsylvaniamaga26histuoft/pennsylvaniamaga26histuoft_djvu.txt

~ ~ ~ ~ ~


United States Navy Archives

Commodore John Hazelwood



John Hazelwood, born in England in 1726, was appointed to superintend the building of fire rafts for the protection of Philadelphia against the British during the Revolutionary War.

A commissioned officer in the Pennsylvania Navy, Commodore Hazelwood commanded all units of the Pennsylvania and Continental navies participating in the defense of the Delaware River approaches to Philadelphia in 1777.

His gunboats and galleys engaged British men-of-war 23 October near river obstructions; and, after the British frigate Merlin and ship of the line Augusta grounded, their crews were forced to burn them. Later Commodore Hazelwood took command of Continental vessels in Delaware Bay.

In recognition of his services in the War for Independence, the Continental Congress voted him a handsome sword, now in the collection of the Naval Historical Foundation. Commodore Hazelwood died at Philadelphia 1 March 1800.




Saint Peter's Episcopal Churchyard
Society Hill
Philadelphia
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA

http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/531.htm


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Pennsylvania
KEYWORDS: freepathon; pennsylvania


While looking for something to post on the Freepathon thread, I found that today, October 23, is a noteworthy date in the War of Independence, 234 years ago.

The more I read, the more fascinated I became in reading about the many men who bravely defended our brand new developing country in the Battle to defend Fort Mifflin.

One such courageous man was Commodore John Hazelwood who would become the Commander of the Pennsylvania Fleet. Philadelphia was our young nation's first Capitol so much was at stake when Commodore Hazelwood bravely battled the British Men of War on the Delaware River.

George Washington said it was critical for America that the British be slowed down in order for the troops to arrive safely at Valley Forge.

Despite being fired upon relentlessly Commodore Hazelwood's Pennsylvania Fleet was able to slow down and help defeat the British in the Battle on October 23, 1777.

Today America is at a cross-roads. Conservatives who would gladly defend the principles and courageous acts which forged our young Nation 234 years ago are facing great challenges.

Free Republic is the Premiere Conservative site on the web offering Conservative activism and open dialogue to Conservatives who are stepping forward in response to those great challenges.

We have so many freedoms because of the incredible bravery of the relative few only a few hundred years ago.

Now more than ever our Nation needs the active participation of many brave Conservatives who support the principles so many fought and died for in creating our great Nation.

If you haven't made a donation yet to the 4th Quarter 2011 Freepathon, please consider doing so now.

If you have already donated, please stop by the Freepathon thread and give it a bump. Only a few dear folks are currently asking Freepers to donate and bump the threads.

If you don't like being asked to contribute, if you resent being asked to write a supportive post, please consider doing one small thing to help those few people who are working hard to keep Free Republic's lights on.

Please click here to make a secure donation to help keep Free Republic's lights on




1 posted on 10/23/2011 9:12:57 PM PDT by bd476
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To: onyx; Fiddlstix; Lady Jag; RedMDer; TheOldLady; trisham; afnamvet; The Cajun; vox_freedom; ...
While looking for something to post on the Freepathon thread, I found that today, October 23, is a noteworthy date in the War of Independence, 234 years ago.

The more I read, the more fascinated I became in reading about the many men who bravely defended our brand new developing country in the Battle to defend Fort Mifflin.

One such courageous man was Commodore John Hazelwood who would become the Commander of the Pennsylvania Fleet. Philadelphia was our young nation's first Capitol so much was at stake when Commodore Hazelwood bravely battled the British Men of War on the Delaware River.

George Washington said it was critical for America that the British be slowed down in order for the troops to arrive safely at Valley Forge.

Despite being fired upon relentlessly Commodore Hazelwood's Pennsylvania Fleet was able to slow down and help defeat the British in the Battle on October 23, 1777.

Today America is at a cross-roads. Conservatives who would gladly defend the principles and courageous acts which forged our young Nation 234 years ago are facing great challenges.

Free Republic is the Premiere Conservative site on the web offering Conservative activism and open dialogue to Conservatives who are stepping forward in response to those great challenges.

We have so many freedoms because of the incredible bravery of the relative few only a few hundred years ago.

Now more than ever our Nation needs the active participation of many brave Conservatives who support the principles so many fought and died for in creating our great Nation.

If you haven't made a donation yet to the 4th Quarter 2011 Freepathon, please consider doing so now.

If you have already donated, please stop by the Freepathon thread and give it a bump. Only a few dear folks are currently asking Freepers to donate and bump the threads.

If you don't like being asked to contribute, if you resent being asked to write a supportive post, please consider doing one small thing to help those few people who are working hard to keep Free Republic's lights on.

Please click here to make a secure donation to help keep Free Republic's lights on




2 posted on 10/23/2011 9:20:55 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476
thanks, for the thread / post.

3 posted on 10/23/2011 9:26:57 PM PDT by skinkinthegrass (I can take tomorrow, spend it all today. Who can take your income, tax it all away. Obama Man can. :)
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To: skinkinthegrass
Glad you liked it. :)

4 posted on 10/23/2011 9:30:13 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476

Thank you so much for the excellent essay-post!


5 posted on 10/23/2011 9:43:37 PM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: Pharmboy

Rev-ping


6 posted on 10/23/2011 10:20:12 PM PDT by ntnychik
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To: Alamo-Girl

You’re welcome, Alamo-Girl! Thank you for the kind comment. :)


7 posted on 10/23/2011 10:31:40 PM PDT by bd476
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To: bd476
Great read!
8 posted on 10/23/2011 10:38:46 PM PDT by Ken H (They are running out of other people's money. )
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To: bd476
When I first glanced at the headline, I thought, 'What the...?'

lol

9 posted on 10/23/2011 10:43:22 PM PDT by Ken H (They are running out of other people's money. )
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To: bd476

Excellent thread, thank you. It shows how real battles aren’t made-for-TV movies, but are always part of larger overall situations that themselves are constantly developing. Therefore never say die, no matter how things look. And always remember that when the enemy talks - they’re lying (by definition).


10 posted on 10/23/2011 11:12:13 PM PDT by Talisker (History will show the Illuminati won the ultimate Darwin Award.)
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To: bd476

This is like Manchester United suffering their worse home defeat in 56 years after they were beaten by Manchester City 6-1.


11 posted on 10/24/2011 12:05:26 AM PDT by Berlin_Freeper
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To: bd476

Did not know about Fort Mifflin and the Navy on the Delaware at all !

Thanks for the history lesson.


12 posted on 10/24/2011 1:28:59 AM PDT by onona (FR is continuing education)
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To: bd476

Good job, BD. Nice one.


13 posted on 10/24/2011 5:11:29 AM PDT by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list)
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To: bd476

Thanks for posting this. My folks lived in Downingtown, about 40 miles NW of Ft. Mifflin, for 40 years. Many is the time I’ve flown in and out of PHL, seen Ft. Mifflin from the air and have made a mental note to visit someday...but I’ve never gotten around to it. The battles on the Delaware in late ‘77 were indeed pivotal.


14 posted on 10/24/2011 5:27:48 AM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: bd476

bump


15 posted on 10/24/2011 5:33:14 AM PDT by Thunder 6
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To: bd476

Nice work. That is a facinating bit of history. Thanks for posting.


16 posted on 10/24/2011 6:33:26 AM PDT by RedMDer (Forward With Confidence!)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
Thanks for posting this. My folks lived in Downingtown, about 40 miles NW of Ft. Mifflin, for 40 years. Many is the time I’ve flown in and out of PHL, seen Ft. Mifflin from the air and have made a mental note to visit someday...but I’ve never gotten around to it. The battles on the Delaware in late ‘77 were indeed pivotal.

I visited Ft Mifflin a year ago. It's a pretty neat place, and once there the commanding view of the Delaware it has is pretty apparent.

This time of year is neat because the Park Service plays up all the alleged paranormal activity they've had there, with Halloween nighttime ghost tours and the like.
17 posted on 10/24/2011 6:41:51 AM PDT by tanknetter
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To: bd476

Two thumbs up!


18 posted on 10/24/2011 6:51:13 AM PDT by bmwcyle (Obama is a Communist, a Muslim, and an illegal alien)
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19 posted on 10/24/2011 7:00:34 AM PDT by RedMDer (Forward With Confidence!)
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To: ntnychik; bd476; indcons; Chani; thefactor; blam; aculeus; ELS; Doctor Raoul; mainepatsfan; ...
Although I usually do not send out a ping to the list for anniversaries or re-enactments, bd476 did such a nice job on this post, I could not resist. And thanks ntnychick for the ping...

The RevWar/Colonial History/General Washington ping list...

20 posted on 10/24/2011 8:50:30 AM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must...)
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To: Pharmboy

Thanks Pharmboy. Great article!!


21 posted on 10/24/2011 10:22:26 AM PDT by ZULU (ANYBODY BUT ROMNEY)
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To: Pharmboy

Thanks!


22 posted on 10/24/2011 11:42:33 AM PDT by aculeus
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To: Pharmboy; bd476

Thanks Pharmboy for the ping (and nice pic too, btw), and thanks bd476 for this topic, as PB says, well done.

I can just imagine the British, “that Mifflin’ fort on the Delaware”.


23 posted on 10/24/2011 7:16:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: bd476; Tribune7; Kid Shelleen
A late (as usual!) Ping for an interesting journey for Pennsylvania history.

Oh - and a BUMP to make you all Monthly Donors.

24 posted on 10/25/2011 4:10:02 PM PDT by brityank (The more I learn about the Constitution, the more I realise this Government is UNconstitutional !!)
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To: Owl_Eagle; brityank; Physicist; WhyisaTexasgirlinPA; GOPJ; abner; baseballmom; Mo1; Ciexyz; ...

ping


25 posted on 10/25/2011 7:03:45 PM PDT by Tribune7 (If you demand perfection you will wind up with leftist Democrats)
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