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Economy: The rising cost of eating
Messenger Post ^ | Posted Nov 03, 2011 @ 09:48 AM | By Scott Pukos, staff writer

Posted on 11/03/2011 8:26:01 PM PDT by DeaconBenjamin

A surge in food prices this year is impacting local grocery stores and restaurants, which in turn affects the people buying food from these places.

But in many cases, owners of eateries and shopping venues say they have little choice but to raise prices to keep up with costs.

“Oh yeah, prices have gone up like crazy,” said Mike Hetelekides, owner of The Villager Restaurant and Diner in Canandaigua. “We can’t keep up.”

The U.S. Agriculture Department said last week that it expects retail food prices to increase 3.5 percent to 4.5 percent this year, after climbing just 0.8 percent in 2010.

Jo Natale, the director of media relations at Wegmans, said a couple factors have led to the increase.

“Higher commodity costs, higher energy costs and a greater demand for food globally has contributed to driving food costs up,” said Natale. “Cost increases are pretty consistent across the board.”

She said that specific commodity costs that have increased include wheat, corn, soy and anything that feeds on those three foods. Transportation costs are also up, she added, which factors into the pricing.

For restaurants, there are other things to consider, aside from just the price of the food specifically.

Hetelekides said his establishment changed its menus — and prices — just over a year ago, and as a result, hasn’t raised the prices again to keep up with the more recent inflating food costs. That’s mostly because it would cost too much to change the menus, he said.

But with the steady rise in flour, bread, meat and especially coffee prices, he fears they’ll have to change those menus sooner, rather than later.

“There’s nothing else you can do,” he said. “It’s easier for distributors to raise prices, but restaurants have to deal with customers.”

Some customers may still go to their favorite spots even with a slight increase in cost.

“We changed prices (over a year ago) because of the economy, but it didn’t take that much of a toll on our business,” said Helen Hendershot, a waitress at The Villager in Canandaigua. “We still have our regulars.”

Hetelekides said a majority of customers will understand why restaurants need to adjust pricing.

“Most people understand,” he said. “They’ll see the changes for themselves at the supermarket.”

However, some supermarkets — like Wegmans — have taken measures to combat those changes.

“We committed in February to keeping prices of 40 items frozen, and to keep those prizes frozen through 2011,” Natale said referring to “everyday items” like bananas, ground beef, baby-cut carrots and some coffee products. Spread out through different categories, flavors and varieties, this impacted about 200 products, she said.

Natale said she didn’t know where the prices on those products would stand after 2011.

“Beyond that, we do our best to consider prices for customers,” she said. “We check competitors’ prices regularly as well.”


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Front Page News; Government; US: New York
KEYWORDS: bhoeconomy; economy; food; foodcosts; getreadyhereitcomes; greateastdepression; inflation; obamadepression; obamanomics; prepperping; stockupandsave; survivalping
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Your hard earned dollars are competing with the “poors” free government dollars to buy food.


51 posted on 11/04/2011 10:59:46 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: aegiscg47

When our town got a Wal-Mart years ago people were afraid the “hardware store on Main Street” would close; I believe they’ll actually close our Shop-Rite and Pathmark as well. Their prices are the best in town for groceries, though you’re up to your armpits in welfare recipients.


52 posted on 11/04/2011 11:03:28 AM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: DeaconBenjamin
The U.S. Agriculture Department said last week that it expects retail food prices to increase 3.5 percent to 4.5 percent this year, after climbing just 0.8 percent in 2010.

These people are lying. Food prices have already risen by double-digits. The books are being cooked. The next President will find that after his first day in office, unemployment will have risen to 14% and inflation will have risen to 12%. The truth will eventually catch up with you.

53 posted on 11/04/2011 11:07:02 AM PDT by Hoodat (Because they do not change, Therefore they do not fear God. -Psalm 55:19-)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

And as we all know, the government’s “solution” isn’t going to be the logical thing (like scaling back the government and doing things to try and strengthen the dollar), but more of the same thing that caused it. Wonder how long it’ll be before we see rationing, registration of food supplies and lovely commercials glorifying the whole shebang.

Isn’t government great?/s


54 posted on 11/04/2011 12:00:12 PM PDT by RWB Patriot ("My ability is a value that must be purchased and I don't recognize anyone's need as a claim on me.")
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To: Baynative

True, which the media never really delves into, the more self reliant (see Conservative, with a capital “C”) realized this and planted gardens in Spring 2011.

And some switched to bike commuting, like I have.


55 posted on 11/04/2011 12:37:57 PM PDT by padre35 (You shall not ignore the laws of God, the Market, the Jungle, and Reciprocity Rm10.10)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

“Economy: The rising cost of eating”

Just added a couple of steers to the farm. Now two steers, 12 chickens and two turkeys although the turkeys will be gone by Christmas ;-)

Going to add on a couple of milk cows in the spring (tax return investment) and still considering rabbits for white meat.

1/3 acre garden gets planted in May and harvested and canned in September.

Food will not be an issue here next year. Power bills? that could end up dinging us a bit.


56 posted on 11/04/2011 12:40:40 PM PDT by Grunthor (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0heL2Czeraw)
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To: RWB Patriot

Remember all the “shortages” that popped up in the Carter era? I think we’re starting to see these in the Baraqqi era too.


57 posted on 11/04/2011 12:45:54 PM PDT by nascarnation (DEFEAT BARAQ 2012 DEPORT BARAQ 2013)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Big agriculture is exporting more food to Asia and other areas—especially beef.


58 posted on 11/04/2011 12:58:47 PM PDT by familyop ("Wanna cigarette? You're never too young to start." --Deacon, "Waterworld")
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To: Hoodat
These people are lying. Food prices have already risen by double-digits.

How many of the people who come up with these numbers do you think actually goes grocery sopping themselves? Anyone who actually buys groceries knows that these government numbers are bogus.

59 posted on 11/04/2011 1:18:52 PM PDT by Prokopton
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To: padre35

We’re planting and canning. Greenhouse is next. I don’t think many people realize how bad things are going to get!


60 posted on 11/04/2011 1:25:26 PM PDT by Baynative (The penalty for not participating in politics is you will be governed by your inferiors.)
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To: TheBattman

Our dollar hasn’t really decreased in value, it stills buys the same amount of labor.


61 posted on 11/04/2011 2:09:20 PM PDT by freedomfiter2 (Brutal acts of commission and yawning acts of omission both strengthen the hand of the devil.)
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To: kearnyirish2

LOL! Between the media and the government, I really don’t know which is the bigger liar.

My computer spreadsheets itemize everything I buy at the grocery stores. I have the date, the store, the item, the size, the price, and a per ounce or per pound price for all the groceries I buy. I can sort the data by any number of variables, so my figures are correct for what I have been paying for my family’s groceries.

Since I started doing this a number of years ago, it has been very interesting to see the price fluctuations and the trends. The most significant trend I discovered is that around the 1st and the 15th of each month prices are at their highest at many stores and the cheapest during the weeks that are not around a normal pay period. I have saved a bundle, just by switching most of my shopping to the cheaper weeks each month.

I also try to buy as much as possible on sale when I shop at regular grocery stores, and use coupons and double them if at all possible. I also buy a lot of things at discount groceries or in bulk. If you are cooking for a family, buying things like cereal, rice, dry beans, pasta, etc. in bulk can save you a lot of money. Many stores now allow you to buy small quantities in their bulk department too, so even a single person can save a lot of money buying things on the bulk aisles.


62 posted on 11/04/2011 2:21:24 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: Flamenco Lady

Yes, there have been some items that have gone through the roof. Until some time last year, I could get plain yellow onions for 79 cents a pound. I paid $1.99/lb earlier this week. I can’t use them fast enough for a bulk bag to be cost effective.

I can’t get a can of beans or tuna for less than 50 cents.

Luckily I don’t by the pre-made stuff often. Most of the stores around me have raised those a little more to offset lower prices on some of the basics.


63 posted on 11/04/2011 2:41:27 PM PDT by PrincessB (Drill Baby Drill.)
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To: Flamenco Lady
The most significant trend I discovered is that around the 1st and the 15th of each month prices are at their highest at many stores and the cheapest during the weeks that are not around a normal pay period. I have saved a bundle, just by switching most of my shopping to the cheaper weeks each month.

Excellent observation. I noticed something like this - that every other week was when the good deals materialized - but had not tied it to pay periods.

64 posted on 11/04/2011 2:57:36 PM PDT by Zhang Fei (Let us pray that peace be now restored to the world and that God will preserve it always.)
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To: Zhang Fei

When do the food stamp cards get “filled up” ?


65 posted on 11/04/2011 2:58:46 PM PDT by nascarnation (DEFEAT BARAQ 2012 DEPORT BARAQ 2013)
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To: Flamenco Lady

Being from a large family, and having a few children myself, I definitely believe in the buying in bulk thing; for some reason the logic escapes the missus.

The reason we have 40 million+ on food stamps is because all governments know the French Revolution and Bolshevik Revolution were primarily driven by actual hunger. Our food stamp program is designed to head that off (too well, in fact; we have the fattest poor people in the world). The most noticeable side effect of the unreported inflation is that almost everything involving discretionary dollars is grinding to a halt, contributing to the downward spiral with more layoffs. Here in NJ our casinos, bars, and high-end restaurants and stores are taking a beating, as people who have had their salaries cut or frozen and their credit “revoked” simply focus on necessities (and cheap ones at that). Our municipal employees (the ones that have survived the mass layoffs) are the only people I know still going on cruises, buying new cars, etc., and there aren’t enough of them to keep a consumer-driven economy afloat. Also, the illegal aliens still able to find work are doing OK; price doesn’t seem important to them as they shop with their untaxed cash.


66 posted on 11/04/2011 3:20:13 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: freedomfiter2

“Our dollar hasn’t really decreased in value, it stills buys the same amount of labor.”

It seems to have decreased in value against everything except homes. In terms of necessities, it has absolutely lost value; to see how much, visit Canada and see what your dollars are worth to people who have no reason to lie to you.


67 posted on 11/04/2011 3:22:32 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: Prokopton

“How many of the people who come up with these numbers do you think actually goes grocery sopping themselves? Anyone who actually buys groceries knows that these government numbers are bogus.”

They are simply paid liars in the service of The Sultan. While some think the media is trying to regain some credibility by actually questioning The Sultan, until they realize how many people can see the inflation staring them in the face they have no chance of being taken seriously. Voters knew this was an issue since the election, and have voted accordingly, “shellacking” Obama’s minions despite every effort by his media to run interference for them.

Anyone who puts gas in their car, buys groceries, anything but a home, can see the inflation.


68 posted on 11/04/2011 3:31:02 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: central_va

Inflation is caused by massive printing of dollars, with no real backing. The printing is caused by the need for cash to fund all of the stimulus; there is no solid backing for the currency (since even the authority to tax doesn’t hold up well when there is less to tax anyway), and the long-term IOUs behind that paper make it a risky investment indeed.

Germany’s answer to the WWI reparations debt was to simply print billions of Marks; it paid the debt, but de-valued the currency to the point where you had to be paid twice a day (to let you spend the first half day’s pay at lunchtime before it lost value), and prices would change in restaurants while you ate.

The Dems solution to our economic problem is nearly identical, and markets have responded accordingly.


69 posted on 11/04/2011 3:36:32 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: simplesimon

Thanks. I’ll try them. I read on another thread this spring that some people harvest the flowers as they bloom and put them in plastic freezer bags in the freezer till they have collected enough.


70 posted on 11/04/2011 4:01:44 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Baynative

I suspect most are to young to recall the Carter and Ford administrations and how horrible things were, we are sort of there now, but the current Fed will just allow inflation to run wild rather then go Volker with 10% interest rates.

FWIW, in France such money saving plots are known as “pottegers”.


71 posted on 11/04/2011 4:16:44 PM PDT by padre35 (You shall not ignore the laws of God, the Market, the Jungle, and Reciprocity Rm10.10)
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To: greeneyes

Youtube has a “depression era” cooking channel where a 94 yr old grandmother prepares the recipes they made during the depression era, one of them was Dandelion Greens:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51VhG8MKxJY&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

Noticed how thoroughly she cleaned them and she tells good tales along the way.


72 posted on 11/04/2011 4:25:53 PM PDT by padre35 (You shall not ignore the laws of God, the Market, the Jungle, and Reciprocity Rm10.10)
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To: padre35

Thanks for the link. I’ll check it out.


73 posted on 11/04/2011 4:43:46 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: PrincessB

I rarely buy onions in bulk, since I usually can find them cheaper by either buying loose onions or in 5 lb. bags. Once in a great while I might pick up a larger bag if it is a great price, but most of the time the smaller size bags or loose onions are cheaper.

If you do buy a larger size bag, sort through them right away, and use the ones that appear to be closest to spoiling first. Onions will also last longer if they are kept in a cool and dark place.

If it doesn’t look like you are going to be able to use them all up before they spoil, chop them up and freeze them in zip lock bags. I like to put about 1 cup of chopped onion in individual sandwich bags, and then throw all the small bags in a larger gallon size freezer bag. Then you can pull them out of the freezer as needed for your recipes.

The prices here for tuna and beans are about the same as in your area. We do have one store that has a coupon about once a month for either Star Kist or Bunble Bee tuna at 3 cans for $1 with a limit of 9 cans. I pick up the maximum I can whenever they are on sale at that price.

I buy dry beans most of the time and cook up a big batch on the weekends and we have half the batch for a dinner that week and I put the other batch in the freezer in a quart size freezer container to have another week. I rotate batches, so one week I might fix black eyed peas, another week navy beans, another black beans, etc., so we don’t get tired of eating the same thing all the time. Depending on the type of bean, the cost of dry beans is usually 20-50% cheaper to buy than prepared canned beans and they taste so much better!

Just about every weekend we are home I have something cooking on the stove. One weekend it might be a home made soup (also made in a double batch), another weekend a stew (again in a double batch), and another weekend beans. I freeze one batch and we eat the other. Then I have quick things to fix on nights I know I will be too tired to cook something from scratch.


74 posted on 11/04/2011 5:30:08 PM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: greeneyes

Yes, please do try them next spring. You’ll love them.
My friend who gave me the recipe and makes them at our camps, is called Mother Earth. She’s into all that stuff.

I have the recipe exact, if you’d like me to post it so that you will have it. Just lemme know.

Have a great weekend.


75 posted on 11/04/2011 8:22:11 PM PDT by simplesimon (Never kick a cow turd on a hot day ~ Hank Williams Jr on the Glenn Beck radio show 10-12-2011)
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To: greeneyes

question about coffee.....if NOT opened, how long does it stay good?.....don’t drink coffee myself but my son does....


76 posted on 11/04/2011 8:50:07 PM PDT by cherry
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
Diane.....buy the liquor if you can....I'm not much of a drinker but I definately see its need if not now, later....

the rice/bean combination supposedly gives you all the complete protein that one needs...I'm going to learn a how to make a good rice and red bean dish.....

77 posted on 11/04/2011 8:56:32 PM PDT by cherry
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To: Flamenco Lady

watch your bacon too....some pkgs are only 12 ounce....


78 posted on 11/04/2011 9:00:47 PM PDT by cherry
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To: simplesimon

yes. please post the recipe. Thanks. You have a good weekend to.


79 posted on 11/04/2011 9:06:31 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: cherry

The coffee should have an expiry date on it. However it will keep longer than that and taste ok. I am not sure what the outside limits are though.


80 posted on 11/04/2011 9:08:09 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: simplesimon

yes....if you could post it.....back in upstate NY, the Italians used to always talk about dandelion “greens” but I’ve never heard about using the heads....


81 posted on 11/04/2011 9:09:43 PM PDT by cherry
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To: DeaconBenjamin

“The U.S. Agriculture Department said last week that it expects retail food prices to increase 3.5 percent to 4.5 percent this year, after climbing just 0.8 percent in 2010.”

??????????????????????????????????????

Where do they shop? I want to buy there, too!

My food prices went up a hell of a lot more than 0.8% in 2010, and more than 4% this year. I’d be doing handsprings if food prices went down to what they were 2 years ago - but it would take more than a 5% reduction!


82 posted on 11/04/2011 9:16:26 PM PDT by Mr Rogers ("they found themselves made strangers in their own country")
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To: greeneyes

Dandy Burgers

1 cup packed dandelion flowers, green base cut off
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup flour
1/8 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1/4 tsp. basil
1/4 tsp. oregano
1/4 cup chopped onion
enough milk to hold all together

Mix all dry ingredients. Add enough milk to hold all together and with wet hands form patties. Fry till golden on both sides. Use dipping sauce for extra flavor:

Dipping sauce:

1/2 cup sour cream
1 Tblsp. Marzetti’s sweet and sour salad dressing.
These freeze well so make plenty while dandelions are available.


83 posted on 11/04/2011 9:59:01 PM PDT by simplesimon (Never kick a cow turd on a hot day ~ Hank Williams Jr on the Glenn Beck radio show 10-12-2011)
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To: cherry

see 83 ~ Enjoy ~


84 posted on 11/04/2011 10:00:49 PM PDT by simplesimon (Never kick a cow turd on a hot day ~ Hank Williams Jr on the Glenn Beck radio show 10-12-2011)
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To: Persevero

“Keep calm and carry on.”

Thanks!

LOL, I have actually been telling myself that.

And I only know that phrase from looking at silly catalogs selling BritCom junk.

But, you know, it works.


85 posted on 11/05/2011 2:43:14 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: DeaconBenjamin

I remember my maternal grandmother always said, “if I didn’t have to eat, I’d be rich.” Everytime I go food shopping, I hear her in the back of my mind and as time goes on, she’s right. I remember hearing a story about an old guy in India who does not eat, yet he lives, been doing it since the 1930’s or so. I’d like to know his secret.


86 posted on 11/05/2011 5:09:17 AM PDT by Nowhere Man ("People should not fear their government, their government should fear the people." - V for Vendetta)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

This is the problem with Democrats running things.


87 posted on 11/05/2011 5:10:42 AM PDT by Vision ("Did I not say to you that if you would believe, you would see the glory of God?" John 11:40)
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To: DeaconBenjamin

Very first rule in saving money, prepare it yourself.
Buy in bulk.
Avoid eating out by any means.
If you are rich with a six figure income you can skip this as it doesn’t apply to silver spoon fed wussies.


88 posted on 11/05/2011 5:12:18 AM PDT by Eye of Unk
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To: SaraJohnson

I recently traveled through much of the affected area. The corn is all there and doing very well. The hysteria was ill founded and the disaster did not pan out.


89 posted on 11/05/2011 5:16:52 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 ..... Crucifixion is coming)
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To: cherry

Hi, Sweetie! Here’s my recipe for Spanish Rice:

1 & 1/2 cups rice
1 small can tomato sauce
1 onion, chopped
2 gloves garlic, chopped (or equivalent from a jar)
1 Tbsp. Olive Oil
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1 tsp. cumin
Additional Mexican spices such as Chipotle, or any taco seasoning mix that you like...season to taste. I don’t salt this, but you can add up to 1 tsp. of salt if you’d like.

Using a big saucepan with a cover, saute onion in olive oil until soft. If using fresh garlic, add it now. If from a jar, add it later. Add the rice and saute until it browns a little bit. Add the rest of the ingredients. Stir until well mixed. Cover and cook for 20 minutes or so on medium heat, stirring occasionally. (It should bubble a little, after covered.)

Add a drained & rinsed can (or freshly made) of pinto, black or kidney beans. (2 cups.)

Serve with cheese, salsa and sour cream. Really yummy. You can also add leftover veggies to this, or add a lb. of ground ‘burger if the troops are complaining. Makes a great side dish, main dish or filling for tacos and/or burritos, etc.

Now I’m hungry for the stuff! :)


90 posted on 11/05/2011 9:34:18 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'Hobbies.' I'm developing a robust Post-Apocalyptic skill set...)
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To: simplesimon

Thanks for the recipe.


91 posted on 11/06/2011 6:16:24 PM PST by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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