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To: donmeaker; lentulusgracchus
I see Christianity as a modern heir to the ancient nature religions, seeking to use similar means to answer the same old questions: Why are we here? What is good? What are we do do? The Pope’s of the Roman Catholic Church has an elected head who’s title in Latin is Pontifex Maximus, the same title given to the head priest in ancient Rome. The ancient religions were always transmuting, and modern religions continue to do so. Latin Jupiter was a transmutation of Greek Zeus-Pater, or English [sky]G-d the Father. Humanity seems to demand religion, and some prefer to justify their belief by ancient texts that are unquestionable to believers. The texts can be the Torah, the Bhagavad-gita, the writings of Virgil, or the New Testament, the Koran, or the Book of Mormon. Each claims to be the best, and last, and rejects the others as either heresy if newer, or ‘incomplete’ if old. Christianity had synods which defined what Christianity was, but demands of people change, problems and situations change, so that generates a need for another synod, later reformations, or in the case of Methodists, annual meetings. Rather like the Romans had colleges of priests, to decide what practices were permitted, or proscribed. One year Isis was permitted, the next year banned, in response to corruption of the priesthood. Alas, the Roman college of priests didn’t prophesy the corruption, but rather reacted to it after it became well known. In like manner, Joseph Smith Jr. was unable to prophesy that he would be accidentally shot by his brother Hiram while attempting to escape from jail while the jail was being attacked by a mob. In like manner, the Catholic Church responded (slowly) to priests molesting children, but have (it seems to me) proven themselves unable to prophesy and act based on that prophesy. Yogi Berra said something to the effect that predicting is hard, especially about the future. Called out? How so? I see myself, and Christians in a long history of asking: Why are we here? What is good? What should we do? Who here is different? I may have read a bit more than most, but am no more clever than most. I am humble, and continue to search for the same answers. Decartes is known for writing “I think, therefore I am.” but before that he wrote “I doubt, therefore I think.” Mother Theresa had her own doubts. I certainly am not superior to her.

Dose all the above mean that you stand by your statement that Christianity is a pagan religion? Just answer the question.

I see myself, and Christians in a long history of asking: Why are we here? What is good? What should we do?

Christians know those answers:

Why are we here? To serve the Lord.

What is good? The Word of God.

What should we do? Follow the Word of God.

72 posted on 12/28/2011 6:32:20 AM PST by cowboyway (Molon labe : Deo Vindice : "Rebellion is always an option!!"--Jim Robinson)
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To: cowboyway

Yes, I continue to hold that Christianity is a pagan religion, by at least one definitions of pagan.

You agree, or seem to, that Christianity answers, for you, the important questions that I said were posed.

You agreed that at least one of the questions were answered by your received text, “The Word of the Lord”.

You see, we have so much in common.


73 posted on 12/28/2011 8:12:48 AM PST by donmeaker (e is trancendentall)
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