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Enterprise to build pipeline from Pennsylvania to Texas {Ethane}
Fuel Fix ^ | January 3, 2012 | Ronnie Crocker

Posted on 01/03/2012 2:08:01 PM PST by thackney

A proposed pipeline project that could transport up to 190,000 barrels of ethane from Appalachian shale fields to the Texas Gulf Coast has secured enough customers to move forward, Enterprise Products Partners announced today.

The Houston company, which revealed two months ago that it had lined up its first long-term contract to use the pipeline, now says it has enough in place to make the project financially feasible. The 1,230-mile line is expected to be running in early 2014, taking advantage of the increased production of natural gas liquids and their lower price relative to oil-based liquids.

“The willingness of shippers to commit to a term of at least 15 years reflects the long-term potential of shale development in the Appalachian region and provides us with the assurance necessary to build the midstream infrastructure that will facilitate further development of this important domestic resource,” Enterprise president and CEO Michael A. Creel said in a statement.

A company spokesman declined to identify any of the newly signed customers or detail how much ethane they committed to purchase. In November, Enterprise announced it had signed Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake Energy Corp. to a contract for 75,000 barrels daily.

In recent years, the Marcellus and Utica shale fields of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia have become a major hub for production of natural gas liquids. One of these, Ethane, a liquid form of natural gas, is feedstock for ethelyne, which in turn is a base material for many plastic products.

To complete the Appalachia-to-Texas project, Enterprise plans to build nearly 600 miles of pipeline from Washington County, Pa., to Cape Girardeau, Mo., then connect to an existing pipeline to Beaumont. The latter is one of two parallel pipelines that move refined products from Beaumont northward, but Enterprise spokesman Rick Rainey said the other, larger line is sufficient to meet demand.

Enterprise would then build a 55-mile connector pipeline to Mont Belvieu, where it has a storage complex, and other lines to petrochemical plants along the Gulf Coast.

Rainey said the project is expected to generate about 4,000 construction jobs and provide broader economic benefits to the petrochemical and pipeline industries and the communities that depend on them.


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: Pennsylvania; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: energy; enterprise; enterprisepipeline; ethane; pennsylvaniapipeline; pipeline; shalegas

1 posted on 01/03/2012 2:08:06 PM PST by thackney
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Demand for price-advantaged ethane feedstock over crude oil-based derivatives within the Gulf Coast petrochemical market is approximately 955,000 barrels per day (“BPD”) and continues to increase.

...

The willingness of shippers to commit to a term of at least 15 years reflects the long-term potential of shale development in the Appalachian region and provides us with the assurance necessary to build the midstream infrastructure that will facilitate further development of this important domestic resource,”...

Originating in Washington County, Pennsylvania, the first leg of the system would involve construction of approximately 595 miles of new pipeline extending to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, closely paralleling an existing Enterprise pipeline. At Cape Girardeau, Enterprise will reverse a 16-inch diameter pipeline and place it into ethane service. By utilizing an existing pipeline and following an existing right-of-way for the section to be constructed, ATEX Express offers a cost-effective and timely solution that also minimizes the project’s environmental impact.

At the southern terminus of the ATEX Express pipeline, Enterprise will be constructing a 55-mile, 16-inch diameter pipeline to provide shippers with access to the partnership’s natural gas liquids storage complex at Mont Belvieu, Texas, giving them direct or indirect access to every ethylene plant in the United States.

http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=80547&p=irol-newsArticle&id=1644093&highlight=


2 posted on 01/03/2012 2:10:32 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney
Not so quick!

Herr Obama has yet to agree.

3 posted on 01/03/2012 2:12:05 PM PST by PALIN SMITH (In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.)
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To: PALIN SMITH

Not crossing an international border keeps the State Department out of the review process.

That was the department that held up the Keystone XL pipeline.


4 posted on 01/03/2012 2:17:22 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

There is a drought in Texas that isn’t going to go away. Why not put in a water line through there while they are at it?


5 posted on 01/03/2012 2:17:43 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Steve Van Doorn

Just how much do you want to pay for water?

If you want to pay that much, there isn’t a shortage of water. If you want to wait for it to fall free from the sky, there is a shortage, for now.


6 posted on 01/03/2012 2:20:06 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Steve Van Doorn

Because we use all of the extra water to frack that gas out of the ground. But not really such a bad idea. Direct from Lake Erie to you.


7 posted on 01/03/2012 2:24:15 PM PST by Drill Thrawl (The patient is too far gone to save.)
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To: thackney

Enterprise is an amazing privately owned company.


8 posted on 01/03/2012 2:24:38 PM PST by eastforker (I'll pick Rick but I still root for Newt.)
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To: Drill Thrawl

“It’s important to put water usage by the oil and gas industry in perspective,” Brownlow said. “For every 1 acre-foot of water used in fracking, 280 acre-feet are used for other purposes in South Texas,” he said.

http://fuelfix.com/blog/2011/11/03/eagle-ford-task-force-gets-the-skinny-on-water/


9 posted on 01/03/2012 2:28:29 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: eastforker

Enterprise is publicly traded.

http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=EPD


10 posted on 01/03/2012 2:30:43 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

A little ice age is coming in about 10 years and will last the rest of our lives. Which means cooler oceans or a very long term el Nina. Texas will dry up but the water from the Mississippi will be even greater then it is today.


11 posted on 01/03/2012 2:32:32 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: thackney

Oh! When did that happen? It was privately owned for many years.


12 posted on 01/03/2012 2:33:57 PM PST by eastforker (I'll pick Rick but I still root for Newt.)
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To: Steve Van Doorn
If you really believe that, you should invest in desalination technology.

I'll pass.

13 posted on 01/03/2012 2:34:22 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: eastforker

Traded on NYSE under symbol EPD...pays a nice dividend, also...

http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=EPD


14 posted on 01/03/2012 2:36:58 PM PST by Former MSM Viewer
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To: eastforker

July 1998?

Maybe?

http://finance.yahoo.com/q/hp?s=EPD&d=0&e=3&f=2012&g=d&a=6&b=28&c=1998&z=66&y=3366


15 posted on 01/03/2012 2:37:11 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

OK. I haven’t been paying attention.


16 posted on 01/03/2012 2:39:52 PM PST by eastforker (I'll pick Rick but I still root for Newt.)
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To: thackney

Don’t tell the EPA about this.


17 posted on 01/03/2012 2:40:06 PM PST by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (Occupy DC General Assembly: We are Marxist tools. WE ARE MARXIST TOOLS!)
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To: thackney
I have no doubt that it is coming. The only question I have is how cold will it get? Either way there will be water but in northern areas such as the water from the Mississippi.

desalination is way to costly compared to aqueducts and pipe lines

18 posted on 01/03/2012 2:41:04 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Steve Van Doorn

NE Ohio had a 5.4 earthquake two days ago and I heard they blamed it on fracking.......stay tuned for prohibitions


19 posted on 01/03/2012 2:49:34 PM PST by estrogen (2012 can't come soon enough)
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To: Steve Van Doorn
There is a drought in Texas that isn’t going to go away. Why not put in a water line through there while they are at it?

It'll be expensive as hell, and Texas has plenty of water within the state, it's just not where it needs to be. In fact, T. Boone Pickens stopped his plans, or somebody else did, to ship water out of Texas.

We'd have a lot more (and cheaper) water if folks in Texas would use Texas-native grasses. We got too many damned transplanted Californios and New Englanders and Floridians who want non-native grasses for their cookie cutter subdivisions that suck up a lot of water so that their lawns can look like a golf course in Florida instead of like a Texan's lawn. I get sick of hearing people bitching about their water bills when they are watering non-native lawns.
20 posted on 01/03/2012 2:52:14 PM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: thackney

Obama will, in all probability, stop the program.


21 posted on 01/03/2012 2:54:54 PM PST by mulligan
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To: Steve Van Doorn
There is a drought in Texas that isn’t going to go away. Why not put in a water line through there while they are at it?

Are you saying that Texas will endure a permanent drought? Besides, Texas has plenty of water:

Build desalinization plants, or wait for rain.

22 posted on 01/03/2012 3:00:45 PM PST by Cobra64 (Common sense isn't common anymore.)
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To: af_vet_rr

I don’t disagree with you.


23 posted on 01/03/2012 3:12:17 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Cobra64
"Are you saying that Texas will endure a permanent drought?"

Not likely permanent it will only last the rest of our lives. Which will start in about 10 years

If it does become permanent we have much bigger problems then a drought.

24 posted on 01/03/2012 3:16:19 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Steve Van Doorn

10 years? We were told in the 70’s that we would be extinct like the Dino’s with an Ice Age. ( In 20 years) HUMMMM, I wouldn’t put to much stock in the enviro predictions.

But, sometimes Mother Nature needs to clean house.
The weak and to stupid from inbreeding don’t survive. The ones that survive are strong and healthy. Thus the next generation will flourish. The fires that hit pine trees will produce young vibrant Pine Trees. The rain will return. The Sun will rise and Texas will be even better than it is today.


25 posted on 01/03/2012 3:18:52 PM PST by marty60
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To: thackney

That is an excellent idea considering most of the cost associated with pipelines is the excavation and back filling. Placing a water line next to the gas line might require some added trench depth but the mobilization costs would be the same. Dirt is dirt and the pipe is the cheap part. Lets see, 2 60’water lines and the gas line between them sounds “doABLE”.


26 posted on 01/03/2012 4:03:12 PM PST by Plumberman27
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To: Plumberman27

Back in the 80’s I worked on a natural gas pipeline (42”) which ran from Canada to California. The new pipeline was buried alongside and existing 36” pipeline.

Canada set the terms... no natural gas could be sold to any business that was in direct competition with existing Canadian companies. Don’t know how they monitored that.

Interesting work on that pipeline that passed through our UA’s (44) local juristiction.


27 posted on 01/03/2012 4:22:58 PM PST by Diver Dave (Because He Lives, I Can Face Tomorrow)
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To: Drill Thrawl

If your remark is not tongue in cheek, the best place to source the water is the furthest down the St. Lawrence River which is still freshwater.


28 posted on 01/03/2012 4:28:58 PM PST by burroak
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To: Steve Van Doorn
We've been getting a decent amount of rain in the Houston area lately. As of a few months ago during the drought, the Houston area had a two year supply of water in reservoirs.
29 posted on 01/03/2012 4:39:15 PM PST by SeaHawkFan
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To: burroak; thackney
I was being the usual sarcastic Drill. It's what I do.

Seriously, it would probably be cheaper to desalinate water from the gulf and pump it north.

30 posted on 01/03/2012 4:47:38 PM PST by Drill Thrawl (The patient is too far gone to save.)
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To: marty60

"We were told in the 70’s that we would be extinct like the Dino’s with an Ice Age. "

We have been in the quaternary ice age for over a 2.5 million years and we be in the ice age for millions of years to come. What we call a little ice age is just a very small dip in our interglacial period which we called the Maunder Minimum. This article is just the latest of many articles on this subject.

I am sorry, don't follow media hype.

31 posted on 01/03/2012 5:03:02 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: SeaHawkFan

That is good. But the drought will be in about 10 years


32 posted on 01/03/2012 5:04:43 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Diver Dave

Aqueduct pipe lines are up to 12’ not 60’. yes it would be a lot bigger then 3 or 4’ gas lines.


33 posted on 01/03/2012 5:14:45 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Diver Dave

Aqueduct pipe lines are up to 12’ not 60’. yes it would be a lot bigger then 3 or 4’ gas lines.


34 posted on 01/03/2012 5:15:08 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Drill Thrawl
"Seriously, it would probably be cheaper to desalinate water from the gulf and pump it north."

if it wasn't for the nuclear power idiocy I would agree.

35 posted on 01/03/2012 5:18:30 PM PST by Steve Van Doorn (*in my best Eric Cartman voice* 'I love you, guys')
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To: Plumberman27
That is an excellent idea considering most of the cost associated with pipelines is the excavation and back filling.

I've been doing pipeline work on and off for a couple decades. I would estimate the excavation and backfilling come far cheaper than the pipe itself, the pump stations and the land acquisition. Moving the dirt is little cost compared to them.

36 posted on 01/03/2012 6:36:26 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney
Thanks for that link...also:

Enterprise and Genesis Energy to Build Crude Oil Gathering Pipeline in the Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

37 posted on 01/04/2012 12:39:51 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: thackney
I thought the EPA was the latest hurdle ....forcing a rerouting of the line because of the Ogallala_Aquifer
38 posted on 01/04/2012 12:45:09 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: thackney
From the link just above:

In 2008, TransCanada Corporation proposed the construction of the 1,661-mile (2,673 km) Keystone XL pipeline to carry oil from the Athabasca oil sands of Alberta to refineries near Houston, Texas.[13][14] The proposed route of the pipeline crossed the eastern part of the Nebraska Sandhills; opponents of the project argued that this route posed an unacceptable risk to the Ogallala Aquifer owing to the possibility of contamination from oil spills.[15][16] In August 2011, an environmental-impact report by the U.S. State Department found the Sandhills route would be the most economically feasible, and would be unlikely to have significant environmental impacts.[15][17]

See also: Risk to Ogallala Aquifer

39 posted on 01/04/2012 1:11:09 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: af_vet_rr
I get sick of hearing people bitching about their water bills when they are watering non-native lawns.

Yeah, me too. But take heart. There is a movement afoot...

Native Prairie Seed Harvested from Houston Area Parks for San Jacinto Battleground

If it was good enough for the Texian Army, it's good enough for me. :)

40 posted on 01/04/2012 1:23:43 PM PST by naxetevitan
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To: af_vet_rr
Texas Wildscapes
Creating a "backyard habitat" by replacing part of your lawn with native plants not only benefits wildlife, but it's less expensive and easier to maintain. Less lawn means less mowing. Native plants are hardy and drought-resistant, so they need little or no water or care.
Now that's MY kind of yard. Low maintenance!
41 posted on 01/04/2012 1:30:40 PM PST by naxetevitan
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To: All
Getting off topic a bit but want to capture this :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_Water_and_Power_Alliance

******************************EXCERPT*****************************************

Go to Wikipedia for links......

**************************************************

The North American Water and Power Alliance (NAWPA or NAWAPA, also referred to as NAWAPTA from proposed governing body the North American Water and Power Treaty Authority) was conceived in the 1950s by the US Army Corps of Engineers as a 'Great Project' to develop more water sources for the United States. The planners envisioned diverting water from some rivers in Alaska south through Canada via the Rocky Mountain Trench and other routes to the US and would involve 369 separate construction projects. The water would enter the US in northern Montana. There it would be diverted to the headwaters of rivers like the Colorado River and others. The water would generate hydro-electricity during its trip via dams. The water supply would double the total amount of fresh water available to lower 48 states with its major focus being on the western states. This would solve the water shortage problems of the west for the foreseeable future. The amount of water available would in fact be so great that some water would be left over for use by Mexico via the Colorado River (which now runs dry as it enters Mexico).

The Corps of Engineers has studied this project and in the late 1950s and early 1960s this project was very close to realization. Washington State Senator "Scoop" Jackson was a significant sponsor and believer in this project.

The project was opposed by public sentiment in Canada on the rare occasions it surfaced in print, though Canadian financier Simon Reisman, who negotiated the Free Trade Agreement, the precursor to the North American Free Trade Agreement, was one of its backers and main promoters. Nonetheless, the Canadian position on free trade exempted water exports, in part specifically to pre-empt any attempted completion of Reisman's long-time pet project.

Recently, there has been a resurgence in the effort to implement NAWAPA, headed up by Lyndon LaRouche and his LaRouchePAC.

[edit]


42 posted on 01/04/2012 1:33:39 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
No, it is the state department that is holding it up. It is why the other pipeline by enterprise that does not cross the internation border will not being held up.

But once the state department had the right to review it, they were allowed to apply "best interest of the nation" and their definition of "best interest".

When you look at our existing pipeline network and the location of Aquifers, you can quickly see that concern is nonsense anyways.


43 posted on 01/04/2012 1:38:55 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Steve Van Doorn; thackney; Tolerance Sucks Rocks; Drill Thrawl; SeaHawkFan; burroak; marty60; ...
See my links above....starting at #38...think I got that right.
44 posted on 01/04/2012 1:41:18 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: thackney

thanks....


45 posted on 01/04/2012 1:43:51 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

That was the outcome of the report. They delayed it anyways after the pressure from liberals.

A current article:

Obama appeared to have skirted what some dubbed the “Keystone conundrum” in November when the State Department announced it was postponing a decision on the pipeline until after this year’s election. Officials said they needed extra time to study routes that avoid an environmentally sensitive area of Nebraska that supplies water to eight states.

Obama, Congress begin 2012 in oil pipeline dispute
http://fuelfix.com/blog/2012/01/02/obama-congress-begin-2012-in-oil-pipeline-dispute/
January 2, 2012


46 posted on 01/04/2012 1:47:18 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney
OT....Just posted this:

Canadian Water Exports:Will NAWAPA Return? ( Friday, 25 January 2008) WPA project....why not?

47 posted on 01/04/2012 3:05:54 PM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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