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Obama’s new re-fi plan a gamechanger? (New program for borrowers who are current on their mortgages)
Hotair ^ | 01/25/2012 | Ed Morrissey

Posted on 01/25/2012 8:33:58 AM PST by SeekAndFind

Jim Pethokoukis thinks it might be, but I’m not so sure. As described by Barack Obama, the program is a significant expansion of a couple of programs that so far had been limited to Fannie/Freddie-backed mortgages. CNBC explains that the new initiative will now promote refinancing for mortgages no matter if backed by one of the two troubled GSEs or not, but with “precious few details” on hand, much of the program remains unclear:

After several largely ineffective programs to help troubled borrowers and after fruitless attempts at budging the hard-line conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, President Obama is proposing a brand new refinance program for borrowers who are current on their mortgages, regardless of who owns their loan; the catch is that this one has to go through Congress.

“I’m sending this Congress a plan that gives every responsible homeowner the chance to save about $3,000 a year on their mortgage, by refinancing at historically low interest rates. No more red tape. No more runaround from the banks,” the President announced in his State of the Union address.

Unlike previous efforts in the refinance space, including a recently revamped and expanded government program for borrowers who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are currently worth, this plan would not be limited to those with loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, according to senior administration officials. The two mortgage giants own or guarantee about half of the nation’s mortgages. It would be open to all borrowers current on their loans.

The Obama administration is offering precious few details, promising more in the coming weeks, but several sources say the plan is to ask Congress to allow the government mortgage insurer, the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), to back refinances of underwater mortgages. No estimates were given as to how many borrowers such a plan could potentially help, only that this would be a voluntary, borrower-initiated plan, and not a blanket refinance of all borrowers.

There are a lot of holes in this plan, not the least of which is why homeowners who are current on payments more than three years after the collapse need government assistance. They may be underwater on their mortgages, but if they are making their payments, then they are at no risk as long as they don’t need to sell. Their monthly payments gradually will eliminate the negative equity in their asset. Refinancing will speed that up slightly by lowering interest rates, but if these houses were bought during the bubble, the current interest rate is probably low from a historical perspective anyway. And to fix the negative equity, those homeowners would have to forego saving the $3000 a year to plow it back into the principal anyway.

Pethokoukis calls this a “housing policy bombshell,” but then summarizes AEI’s Ed Pinto to explain why it will be a dud:

But surely questions will be raised if the FHA is the vehicle. As AEI’s Ed Pinto explains, the FHA’s capital position using private-industry standards shows the FHA to be deeply insolvent. The FHA is estimated to have a current net worth of –$17 billion and an estimated capital shortfall of $35–53 billion. Private regulators would shut it down rather than continuing to allow it to “grow” its way out of its insolvency. Republicans will have lots of questions and may balk if this smells like a moral hazard-inducing housing bailout. (It is just this sort of thing that launched the Tea Party movement, after all.) Then there’s the bank tax to deal with. This SOTU shocker may well be the talk of the markets today.

Pethokoukis also relies on estimates that indicate up to 10 million homeowners will take the opportunity to refinance through this program, and an average savings of $3000 per year would pump $30 billion more into the economy each year. However, if the problem is negative equity, then that money will go to paying down mortgage debt, not to increased consumer spending, which would render it impactless in the short or even medium term — and that’s assuming that the 10 million number is valid. We saw plenty of numbers like this in the proposals already put in place by the Obama administration to deal with housing issues, and the actual number of people who qualified for and received assistance fell far, far short of estimates. In fact, if the program operated as Pethokoukis assumes in generating spending cash for homeowners who are already under water, then it’s not that different from what helped drive the housing bubble in the first place: the use of home equity as an ATM for irrational consumer spending.

Being underwater on a mortgage is a tough economic position, but no tougher than people who invest in other assets and end up having less value than what they invested. If homeowners find themselves in this position, they can keep paying the mortgage and eventually get above water on equity while continuing to live in their homes, which isn’t ideal but certainly isn’t an emergency that warrants picking the pockets of other taxpayers. It also won’t do anything to prevent or minimize foreclosures, which is one of the actual problems in the housing market. This is nothing more than a bald attempt to buy a few votes at the expense of taxpayers and banks, and it will exacerbate the very problems it purports to address. Game-changer? More like an overtime period.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: home; mortgage; obama; refinance

1 posted on 01/25/2012 8:34:05 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

How can note holders be forced to allow refinancing without either taking their property or giving them more federal free money? Obama is on a new spending spree with our (soon to be) worthless dollars.


2 posted on 01/25/2012 8:38:52 AM PST by businessprofessor
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To: SeekAndFind

Isn’t this the plan Rush Limbaugh was talking about a couple months ago, and then the regime came out and said it wasn’t a real plan?

Hussein sucks.


3 posted on 01/25/2012 8:40:18 AM PST by Recovering_Democrat
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To: SeekAndFind
There are a lot of holes in this plan, not the least of which is why homeowners who are current on payments more than three years after the collapse need government assistance.

so the masses will love Dear Leader and hang his portrait on their gubmint financed wall.

4 posted on 01/25/2012 8:41:25 AM PST by WOBBLY BOB (Congress: Looting the future to bribe the present.)
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To: SeekAndFind

The article is correct, that most who bought at the peak of the housing bubble probably already have low interest rates. If you limit the program to those with high interest rates, where a refinance could really help, they probably have poor credit (thus, a high interest rate). This sounds like a plan that has just one purpose - to garner votes from not so thoughtful voters.


5 posted on 01/25/2012 8:43:07 AM PST by mcjordansc
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To: SeekAndFind
How many taxpayer funded Re-Fi programs has O'Bozo already announced?

How many have just put more money in the hands of cronies and done little to help the deserving homeowner?


6 posted on 01/25/2012 8:44:19 AM PST by Iron Munro ("Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight he'll just kill you." John Steinbeck)
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To: SeekAndFind

:: they are at no risk as long as they don’t need to sell. ::

As Cletus is finding out in the suburban Chicago market!


7 posted on 01/25/2012 8:44:39 AM PST by Cletus.D.Yokel (Catastrophic Anthropogenic Climate Alterations - The acronym explains the science.)
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To: businessprofessor

I wonder how many underwater loans are refis, where the homeowner stripped the equity out to spend the money on consumer items (cars,tvs,vacatrions, etc.). If this situation is allowed, then this is another free money scheme, and is pure evil.


8 posted on 01/25/2012 8:45:13 AM PST by The_Media_never_lie
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To: SeekAndFind

Reducing interest rates and monthly mortgage payments does release more money into other consumer areas of the economy.

And of course, re-fi related closing costs are big income boosters to lawyers and banks.

‘nuff said.


9 posted on 01/25/2012 8:46:11 AM PST by sodpoodle ( Newt - God has tested him for a reason..)
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To: SeekAndFind

Pure takeover BS, same old play, create a department or program, have it go broke and tax everyone else in the name of fairness, here is my definition of fairness...that the government not be given 1 cent of our money until they represent what we want, then money to the federal government will be metered and slow to come...
at our will..anything short is slavery..


10 posted on 01/25/2012 8:51:11 AM PST by aces
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To: SeekAndFind
HARP is already out there for Fannie Freddie loans, and it was expanded in November.
It actually works pretty well. It basically lets someone refi a current Fannie or Freddie loan when property values have dropped.

It basically says yes to someone who asks: “you already have my mortgage, why can't I refinance without all the hassle”

But not all Fannie Freddie loans will be HARP eligible when we check. Not sure why.

11 posted on 01/25/2012 8:51:28 AM PST by HereInTheHeartland (I love how the FR spellchecker doesn't recognize the word "Obama")
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To: SeekAndFind

Some on the Left this morning are claiming this is just a populist piece of candy being offered to get us to swallow the accompanying bag of dog poo (i.e. amnesty for all those banks involved in robosigning of foreclosures)


12 posted on 01/25/2012 8:51:54 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: SeekAndFind

There is NO housing crisis.

There is a JOBS crisis.

The population is growing and the labor force is SHRINKING.

More people, fewer people working, it is called Socialism.

Work force participation rates are approaching those of the Great Depression.

When labor participation starts to rise along with real incomes, then the housing crisis will take care of itself.

You cannot prop up a housing market at its bottom with public money which has to be borrowed from China or whoever is buying our debt.

This economy cannot be turned around as long as Barry is in the White House, but changing Presidents is not going to turn this country around.

Newt correctly said the other night that Dodd-Frank needs to be repealed immediately but that ain’t happening as long as the treacherous Dems and the RINOS control the Senate no matter who the POTUS is.


13 posted on 01/25/2012 8:56:40 AM PST by Biblebelter
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To: mcjordansc

“My EPA and Bammycare trashed the job market you lost your job and your credit rating sank...here’s a carrot- be sure to pull the lever marked ‘0’ in November and vote early and often, sucker”


14 posted on 01/25/2012 8:57:46 AM PST by WOBBLY BOB (Congress: Looting the future to bribe the present.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Didn’t they do something like this once or twice already?

Same stuff, different day.


15 posted on 01/25/2012 9:01:09 AM PST by Califreak ("Burnt By The Sun")
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To: SeekAndFind

Having recently refinanced my FHA mortgage after battling like hell to keep current in this O-conomy, I simply say:

FUBO.


16 posted on 01/25/2012 9:01:48 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Why, yes. I AM in a bad mood.)
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To: businessprofessor

The banks might like being able to unload the loans they hold in their portfolios, ie not Fannie, Freddie and Ginnie, with this refinance plan. All the risk is going to be shifted to the FHA. Of course it us taxpayers who are the ultimate guarantors. In a sense this is an indirect bail out of the banks. I am sure BofA would love to unload all the potential crap in their loan book from Countrywide.


17 posted on 01/25/2012 9:04:16 AM PST by C19fan
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To: SeekAndFind

This is a scam of the highest degree...... what most people do not take into account is principal owed vs interest owed....if you are paying more to principal than interest, when you refi you will be paying more to the interest than the debt.... this is a way to actually put yourself further in debt by removing the equity you have built up.... take my case, I am toward the end of my mortgage, and pay almost 100% towards the principal. In reality, my interest rate is now zero percent. If I refinance the balance at 3%, my first few years will go almost 100% to interest. This will actually take cash out of my pocket and put it into the banks... Before you do anything, look at the principal / interest percentage of your payment.


18 posted on 01/25/2012 9:05:24 AM PST by joe fonebone (Project Gunwalker, this will make watergate look like the warm up band......)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

Wasnt part of this plan, that the lender gets a percentage of any future rise in the value of the house? The details on this are gonna stink,, people NOT behind on their mortgage will drop a point on their rates,, and then discover the bank is now a co-owner of the future equity.


19 posted on 01/25/2012 9:11:04 AM PST by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Seems pretty obvious to me they want to write new mortgages that contain something the old ones didn’t.


20 posted on 01/25/2012 9:13:24 AM PST by papertyger
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To: SeekAndFind

Oh, just seize the notes from those nasty banks, burn them and give everyone a free house!!! Then, since you own GM put a free car or two in every garage! Food and gas too high? Just seize the farms and refineries. That will win you the sheeple vote (take it from old Hugo, it really does sew things up for reelection).

Why have taxpayers pay for programs when the government can just take it all. Stop pussy-footing around already and get to where you want to go Mr. Dictator, er President.


21 posted on 01/25/2012 9:15:33 AM PST by keepitreal ( Good manners never go out of style)
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To: SeekAndFind

He has no legal or historical authority to do any of this.


22 posted on 01/25/2012 9:18:22 AM PST by hedgetrimmer
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To: SeekAndFind
The real purpose of this plan (like its predecessors) is to keep the mortgages on the banks' books at their face values.

The banksters are desperate, desperate not to have to revalue their mortgage portfolios at current market prices, and will go along with anything Zero proposes to keep that from happening.

23 posted on 01/25/2012 9:27:04 AM PST by Notary Sojac (Liberalism: Ideas so good, they have to be mandatory!!)
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To: joe fonebone

Too true. Triple check the fine print as the devil will be in the details.

Also, some numbers I read from a different site were in the 20,000 per loan by 1 million loans. Hardly a windfall. Most houses purchased in the bubble have lost 50 to 200k or more. 20,000 is chump change and does nothing to really help the homeowner.

Which is why I think this is really about tossing some turds to homeowners, calling them diamonds, while really helping out the banks with our money, who in turn kick it back to the Dims. I almost forgot, the media will hail it as the smartest best thing ever and the sheeple will buy it and re elect the won.

It is the smartest best thing ever IF you want to continue to destroy the country and get re elected for doing so.


24 posted on 01/25/2012 9:31:17 AM PST by 1malumprohibitum
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To: Notary Sojac
...The real purpose of this plan (like its predecessors) is to keep the mortgages on the banks' books at their face values...

Or, since many banks don't know if they really and truly own the note (due to the robo-signing and MBS mess) this will start the process over and the paper trail will begin anew. The banks will then know for sure they own the note.

25 posted on 01/25/2012 9:55:42 AM PST by FReepaholic (Stupidity is not a crime, so you're free to go.)
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26 posted on 01/25/2012 9:58:11 AM PST by RedMDer (Forward With Confidence!)
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To: 1malumprohibitum

Amen, brother, amen


27 posted on 01/25/2012 10:06:07 AM PST by joe fonebone (Project Gunwalker, this will make watergate look like the warm up band......)
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To: SeekAndFind
Am I a tiny minority?

I don't even have a "mortgage" anymore. I have a "home equity loan," which I pay back as if it were a "mortgage." I'm not sure what the bank's recourse is if I stop paying them back, but they do not hold a mortgage on my property.

ML/NJ

28 posted on 01/25/2012 10:10:21 AM PST by ml/nj
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To: joe fonebone

Hey, I am not intending this as an attack on you.....you should go brush up on amortization schedules. Your interst is not a fixed dollar amount over the term of you mortgage and then “frontloaded” in your early payments. The interest portion of you pmt is a function of the size of your total principle. As you make your payments, your total principle decreases, therefore the interest for the month is a lower portion of the pmt...


29 posted on 01/25/2012 10:16:54 AM PST by CSM (Keeper of the "Dave Ramsey Fan" ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: DesertRhino

I hadn’t heard that but it wouldn’t surprise me a bit if it were true.


30 posted on 01/25/2012 10:20:34 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Why, yes. I AM in a bad mood.)
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To: CSM; joe fonebone

Joe’s main point is correct, and I say this working in the financial industry.

Anyone who refinances their mortgage (including me) will now see a payment schedule reset to mortgage-first. I refinanced my loan based upon the amount of remaining principle I have to pay (it was an FHA Streamline, which did not require an appraisal).

That is why we recommend that those who pursue such a strategy, especially later in their mortgage, rededicate a portion of their cash flow savings to extra repayment, to lower the principal amount more quickly as a vehicle to early debt retirement.


31 posted on 01/25/2012 10:33:21 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Why, yes. I AM in a bad mood.)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

rented fingers. Mortgage-first = interest-first. Argh.


32 posted on 01/25/2012 10:33:58 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Why, yes. I AM in a bad mood.)
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To: CSM

well, i get this here statement from the bank, to use for tax purposes, telling me how much principal and interest I paid for the year.....and that statement, that the feds use for tax purposes, shows a smaller interest payment every year for the past 22 years... now I pay almost zero interest, yet my payment is the same...and has been for 22 years...at the beginning of my mortgage, they showed me how much interest i would pay over the life of the loan, making that amount “fixed”, and the bank got their cut first right off the top....

If I refinanced, the bank would still get it’s cut first, and my principal would remain virtually the same for years....

I do not care about amortization schedules.. If I am paying zero interest on my loan, my interest rate is zero. If the bank tells you upfront how much interest you are going to pay over the life of the loan, that amount is fixed. If the banks gets more of my payment than is applied to the principal, they are “frontloading” the loan. Simple logic applies here.


33 posted on 01/25/2012 10:36:43 AM PST by joe fonebone (Project Gunwalker, this will make watergate look like the warm up band......)
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To: The_Media_never_lie
I wonder how many underwater loans are refis, where the homeowner stripped the equity out to spend the money on consumer items (cars,tvs,vacatrions, etc.).

Thousands...tens of thousands. Mortgage lenders are soiling their pants, knowing that they'll eventually be taking huge losses on those mortgages. The last three years have been wasted on kicking the can down the road.

The can is changing into a nuke.

34 posted on 01/25/2012 10:52:24 AM PST by Night Hides Not (My dream ticket for 2012 is John Galt & Dagny Taggart!)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

Or simply take a lower loan period.


35 posted on 01/25/2012 11:00:34 AM PST by CSM (Keeper of the "Dave Ramsey Fan" ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: joe fonebone

However if you paid extra on the principle you would see the formula completely change. The interest is calculated monthly and is a multiplier of your principle. As your principle decreases, your interest is reduced. Therefore your interest portion of your pmt decreases faster.

It appears to be frontloaded, but is simply a function of simple amortization. I know because I track mine monthly to keep an eye on the mortgage company as I am aggressively paying my mortgage down! At this pace I should only have 17 more pmts!


36 posted on 01/25/2012 11:09:26 AM PST by CSM (Keeper of the "Dave Ramsey Fan" ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: papertyger

“It is hard to imagine a more stupid or dangerous way of making decisions than by putting those decisions in the hands of people who pay no price for being wrong”- Thomas Sowell


37 posted on 01/25/2012 12:54:18 PM PST by WOBBLY BOB (Congress: Looting the future to bribe the present.)
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To: CSM

it still is frontloaded... however, as one poster put it, the devil is in the details... I remember having to have my contract changed, to allow for extra payments to be applied to the principal ( the bank will automatically apply any extra monies to the interest ) and to remove the early payoff penalty ( this penalty is to ensure the bank gets all of their interest )... check your papers on ANY loan for ANY thing you get from a bank or any other financial institution... the contract is written so that they get their money first... PERIOD.. do you work for a bank or financial institution.. not a put down question, but a quest for knowledge..... let me know


38 posted on 01/25/2012 3:04:22 PM PST by joe fonebone (Project Gunwalker, this will make watergate look like the warm up band......)
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To: joe fonebone

Nope, I do not work at a bank.

Many people do not understand amortization schedules, however they are pretty simple. Perhaps you have a very old or nonstandard loan type and it may be unique, but the standard mortgage is a simple amortization loan that calculates and applies 1/12th of the interest rate to the principle balance each month. Then the remaining portion of your payment is applied to principle.

As you pay each payment then your principle is reduced, hence your interest is less. That is why as you make payments the interest decreases as a portion of the payment. This is why my aggressive paying additional on my principle knocks multiple years off the back end. Each time I do that, it reduces the interest calculation for the next month. In turn it also effects the ratio of principle in my next month’s payment.

If you pay per you payment schedule over the loan term, you simply complete the amortization schedule per the loan agreement. In essence you are sticking with the ratio of pmt/princ each month of the agreement.


39 posted on 01/25/2012 5:19:33 PM PST by CSM (Keeper of the "Dave Ramsey Fan" ping list. FReepmail me if you want your beeber stuned.)
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To: CSM

There are a number of options. That is definitely one.


40 posted on 01/25/2012 5:49:00 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Why, yes. I AM in a bad mood.)
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To: Recovering_Democrat

It was. The author begins the article with “I told you so”, in reference to that episode earlier in January. He links to that toward the end of this article.


41 posted on 01/26/2012 7:38:41 AM PST by jiggyboy (Ten percent of poll respondents are either lying or insane)
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