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Grand Canyon National Park to Eliminate Sale of Water in Disposable Containers
KCSG Television ^ | 2-7-12 | James Doyle

Posted on 02/07/2012 5:54:01 AM PST by SJackson

(Grand Canyon, AZ) - Grand Canyon National Park will eliminate the in-park sale of water packaged in individual disposable containers within 30 days under a plan approved Monday by National Park Service (NPS) Intermountain Regional (IMR) Director John Wessels. Free water stations are available throughout the park to allow visitors to fill reusable water bottles.

The park’s plan calls for the elimination of the sale of water packaged in individual disposable containers of less than one gallon, including plastic bottles and various types of boxes. The waste associated with disposable bottles comprises an estimated 20 percent of the park’s overall waste stream and 30 percent of the park’s recyclables.

Grand Canyon National Park’s plan was submitted and approved in accordance with the policy issued by NPS Director Jonathan B. Jarvis on December 14, 2011. Under the policy, parks are directed to implement a disposable plastic water bottle recycling and reduction policy, with an option to eliminate in-park sales – with the approval of the park’s regional director – following a thorough analysis of a variety of factors ranging from the cost to install water filling stations, to the cost and availability of BPA-free reusable containers, to potential effects on public safety.

Regional Director Wessels said, “Our parks should set the standard for resource protection and sustainability. Grand Canyon National Park has provided an excellent analysis of the impacts the elimination of bottled water would have, and has developed a well-thought-out plan for ensuring that the safety, needs and comfort of visitors continue to be met in the park," he said. "I feel confident that the impacts to park concessioners and partners have been given fair consideration and that this plan can be implemented with minimal impacts to the visiting public," Wessels added.

Grand Canyon National Park has experienced increasing amounts of litter associated with disposable plastic bottles along trails both on the rim and within the inner canyon, marring canyon viewpoints and visitor experiences.

“We want to minimize both the monetary and environmental costs associated with water packaged in disposable containers,” said Grand Canyon Superintendent Dave Uberuaga. “We are grateful to the Director for recognizing the need for service-wide guidance on this issue and for providing a thoughtful range of options.”

“A lot of careful thought went into this plan and its implementation,” said Director Jarvis. “I applaud Grand Canyon National Park for its efforts to reduce waste and the environmental impacts created by individually packaged water. This is another example of The National Park Service’s commitment to being an exemplar of the ways we can all reduce our imprint on the land as we embrace sustainable practices that will protect the parks for generations to come.”

Read more: KCSG Television - Grand Canyon National Park to Eliminate Sale of Water in Disposable Containers


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1 posted on 02/07/2012 5:54:03 AM PST by SJackson
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To: Iowa Granny; Ladysmith; Diana in Wisconsin; JLO; sergeantdave; damncat; phantomworker; joesnuffy; ..
If you’d like to be on or off this Outdoors/Rural/wildlife/hunting/hiking/backpacking/National Parks/animals list please FR mail me. And ping me is you see articles of interest.
2 posted on 02/07/2012 5:55:01 AM PST by SJackson (The Pilgrims Doing the jobs Native Americans wouldn't do !)
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To: SJackson

Maybe they should just cut attendance by 20%? /sarc.


3 posted on 02/07/2012 5:59:08 AM PST by Paladin2
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To: SJackson

This is a good move in my opinion.

If people weren’t generally ‘trashy’ and took out what they brought in, this wouldn’t be necessary.


4 posted on 02/07/2012 5:59:11 AM PST by wolfcreek (Perry to Obama: Adios, MOFO!)
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To: SJackson

Having walked a lot of miles in National Forests I can tell you the “Leave no trace behind” concept is hard for some to grasp.

Some will carry a plastic water bottle a few miles into the woods - drink it - and then just drop it beside the trail.

And don’t get me started on steel cans and glass bottles in fire pits.

I’m no libby tree hugger but damn folks carry out your trash.


5 posted on 02/07/2012 6:00:28 AM PST by PeteB570 ( Islam is the sea in which the Terrorist Shark swims. The deeper the sea the larger the shark.)
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To: SJackson
That's just brilliant. I guess they don't care that visitors will be dropping from dehydration on the trails in the summertime because they couldn't buy a stinkin' bottle of water for their hike.

Maybe they will sell Nalgene bottles. And people will use them once for their visit and then toss them.

PC run utterly amok.

6 posted on 02/07/2012 6:00:36 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: wolfcreek
If people weren’t generally ‘trashy’ and took out what they brought in, this wouldn’t be necessary.

I agree.

I was there in 2010 and while it was pretty clean, I still saw the occasional water battle or other trash laying around. I don't understand who does this. I suspect this really won't have much affect on the trash left behind as people will just pack it in and leave it anyway.

7 posted on 02/07/2012 6:02:40 AM PST by Malsua
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To: SJackson
I guess the stores just out side the park well be doing a booming business in bottle water.
8 posted on 02/07/2012 6:04:13 AM PST by riverrunner
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To: SJackson
Temperatures in the gorge hit an AVERAGE high of 92 in May, 101 in June, 106 in July, 103 in August, and 97 in September. These are about 30 degrees warmer than on the North Rim, 20 degrees warmer than the South Rim. Even as an experienced desert hiker, I was shocked by the rapid transition in three hours of hiking (a 45-50 degree swing from morning temperatures on the rim to afternoon down in the canyon).

This will save on trash volume but kill tourists, as inadequately prepared hikers who can't buy last minute water bottles hit the trail with insufficient water and an assumption that they will be fine since it's a cool day. I imagine the Obama Administration considers that a net win.

9 posted on 02/07/2012 6:05:17 AM PST by Pollster1 (Natural born citizen of the USA, with the birth certificate to prove it)
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To: dirtboy

That’s just brilliant. I guess they don’t care that visitors will be dropping from dehydration on the trails in the summertime because they couldn’t buy a stinkin’ bottle of water for their hike.


“Free water stations are available throughout the park to allow visitors to fill reusable water bottles.”

Stupidity is a person’s right I guess should they choose to head out without water.


10 posted on 02/07/2012 6:06:39 AM PST by deport (..............God Bless Texas............)
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To: PeteB570

It’s kind of interesting when you long-distance hike. You’ll find an inner circle that’s about as far in as lazy folks will go, and the trash extends from there to the road. You hardly need a map to know that you’re coming close to a trailhead. Fortunately, these folks generally don’t get too far into the back country, as their laziness to carry trash out generally extends to their laziness to walk too far.

That kind of mentality has pretty much destroyed the Appalachian Trail. As most of it is within the reaches of roads and towns, it’s become one long trash line from Georgia to Maine.


11 posted on 02/07/2012 6:06:53 AM PST by Magnatron
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To: SJackson

I ended my volunteerism with the NPS when the idiots made me register my Civil War single shot black powder pistol just so I could perform living history at a park.


12 posted on 02/07/2012 6:08:57 AM PST by vetvetdoug
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To: Malsua
It's all those ‘earth first’ Liberals. I work at a university and you can't believe how sloppy and lazy these kids are. The parking area is ALWAYS a wreck. In the halls, kids throw all kinds of trash everywhere...yea, the kids with the long hair, hardware on their faces and peace sticker on their book bag. Real enviro conscious, right?
13 posted on 02/07/2012 6:13:52 AM PST by SMARTY ("The man who has no inner-life is a slave to his surroundings. "Henri Frederic Amiel)
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To: PeteB570
I’m no libby tree hugger but d@mn folks carry out your trash.

This pushes one of my buttons.

Many of us are of an environmental-preservation mindset - but we are not "Environmentalists" as defined by society at large. Reduce pollution? carry out your trash? preserve wilderness? minimal impact? green power? heck yeah! To the detriment of humanity? in accordance with Leftist principles? no way!

We need a term which captures the essence of "right-wing environmentalism" without invoking watermelons.

14 posted on 02/07/2012 6:18:08 AM PST by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: wolfcreek

I agree. I use a Camelback waterpack and haul in my own. Folks should probably bring a Katadyn or MSR filter if they need more and just process it from streams and lakes on the trail if necessary.


15 posted on 02/07/2012 6:18:43 AM PST by MachIV
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To: ctdonath2

I prefer the term “Conservation”.


16 posted on 02/07/2012 6:19:44 AM PST by MachIV
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To: dirtboy

You can bring refillable bottles. There are water stations to fill the bottles. We were just at the Grand Canyon last summer and this is what we did.


17 posted on 02/07/2012 6:21:52 AM PST by KansasGirl
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To: Magnatron

My boys and I did a 14 mile overnight hike in the smoky mountains. The first 3 was fairly well traveled and clean. I don’t recall seeing any trash.

At about mile 3 a few pieces started to appear. I picked up some on the way back out but was pretty beat so the single tennis show laying in the middle of the trail is probably still there.


18 posted on 02/07/2012 6:26:04 AM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: SJackson

So they’re not gonna sell water, but are they going to sell Coca Cola and Gatorade????????????????


19 posted on 02/07/2012 6:26:07 AM PST by petitfour
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To: deport
I went to NOLS. I am trained in low-impact wilderness travel.

But the trails in Grand Canyon are not low-impact areas. You're gonna see litter.

And this does nothing to alleviate those who bring in the bottled water in their cars, which I imagine are a lot of the visitors.

I just see this as PC run amok while ignoring the issue of folks getting dehydrated while hiking. Put a deposit and stamp on the water bottles sold in the park and folks will bring them to you if they are left by the trail. If a bottle by the trail wasn't sold by the park, this regulation wouldn't have had any effect anyway.

20 posted on 02/07/2012 6:26:16 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: ctdonath2

“We need a term which captures the essence of “right-wing environmentalism” without invoking watermelons.”

They used to be called “Men”


21 posted on 02/07/2012 6:27:28 AM PST by RFEngineer
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To: dirtboy

Life’s tough. It’s tougher if you’re stupid.
Making the effort to visit the Grand Canyon in summer without making the effort to take water is stupid.

At least by selling Nalgene bottles there will be less trash left out there, and what the stupids do leave out there will be reusable by others. 1 expensive bottle found and reused is better than 12 chincy bottles not worth recycling (much less reused by finder).

Sometimes PC and Conservative do sorta line up. Neither think it’s sensible to facilitate idiots littering.


22 posted on 02/07/2012 6:29:10 AM PST by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: PeteB570

That’s why our subways in NYC are crawling with rats.
People who eat & drink on trains & buses should CARRY OUT THEIR TRASH.


23 posted on 02/07/2012 6:29:27 AM PST by FES0844
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To: wolfcreek

Yep, have plenty of free running water and maybe sell or rent with a higher deposit more permanent containers.


24 posted on 02/07/2012 6:29:36 AM PST by 9YearLurker
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To: MachIV

This is the grand canyon, isn’t that basically a desert in many areas with limited amounts of surface water?


25 posted on 02/07/2012 6:32:49 AM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: ctdonath2
This will do nothing to alleviate disposable bottles brought in by visitors. Nalgene bottles are expensive. Put a stamped deposit on disposable bottles sold in the park and people will bring them out for the deposit if they see them by the trail.

I see this as part of the left's war on bottled water, and largely not relevant to the stated issues as to why they are issuing a ban.

26 posted on 02/07/2012 6:33:52 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: KansasGirl
You can bring refillable bottles. There are water stations to fill the bottles. We were just at the Grand Canyon last summer and this is what we did.

I see this as part of the left's war on bottled water. And I don't use bottled water. I just think there are better, more practical options than an outright ban.

27 posted on 02/07/2012 6:36:12 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

Did the EPA outlaw the manufacturing of “Canteens”?


28 posted on 02/07/2012 6:36:12 AM PST by massgopguy (I owe everything to George Bailey)
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To: SJackson

SJ please add me


29 posted on 02/07/2012 6:36:58 AM PST by reed13k (Knight Rampant Bibliophile, Protector of Knowledge, Purveyor of Inquiry, Defender of Aged Wisdom, an)
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To: petitfour

Good question. No indication they will, but none they won’t either. Replace vending machines with BYOB[ottle] soda fountains?


30 posted on 02/07/2012 6:37:39 AM PST by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: PeteB570
I’m no libby tree hugger but damn folks carry out your trash.

In my experience, libby tree-huggers are the problem.

31 posted on 02/07/2012 6:38:34 AM PST by HIDEK6
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To: SJackson
Water fountains - the Horror!

Next, the Luddites-N-Green will mandate we drink only from local springs.

And then only according to the rites of the Indigenous Peoples.

32 posted on 02/07/2012 6:39:21 AM PST by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles."...the public interest)
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To: massgopguy
Did the EPA outlaw the manufacturing of “Canteens”?

OK, you're Joe Suburbanite. You want to buy four one-liter bottles for you, your wife and your kids. Normally would cost you six to eight bucks or so.

Instead, you are looking at 32 bucks for four Nalgene bottles at eight bucks each. You say screw that, you ain't paying that much for water, let's hit the trail without it. And one of the kids ends up dehydrated, collapses, and the rangers have to haul him out.

There are better solutions. Put a fifty-cent stamped deposit on bottles sold in the park, and people will pack out such bottles for the deposit refund if they find them by the trail.

I smell left-wing activism against bottled water here. There are better solutions to address the stated problems.

33 posted on 02/07/2012 6:40:37 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

There’s a difference between a ban and just not facilitating the activity. Not selling cheap bottles easily tossed as litter by those not smart enough to at least bring their own may not solve the problem, but it reduces facilitation of it.


34 posted on 02/07/2012 6:41:10 AM PST by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: HIDEK6

I remember the Earth Day celebration on the Washington Mall...it took two days to pick up all of the trash they left behind.


35 posted on 02/07/2012 6:42:55 AM PST by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: SJackson

Last summer I took the family hiking up the Boulder flat irons, Rocky Mt. Nat. Pk., Mesa Verde, Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, and many spots along the way. We carried canteens (gallon jugs in the car), but I could count the number of expended water bottles that we saw on one hand. Those appeared to be accidental drops over developed overviews.

Can’t say I saw a trash problem. As for cutting down on the amount of trash to carry out of parks, I’m thinking water containers should be at the bottom of the list. People need to hydrate.

I do think this will result in a fair amount of dehydration, as people who visit the parks are VISITORS, and don’t know how much water they need in dry, high elevations.

They should at least offer affordable canteen rigs if that is what they want to push.


36 posted on 02/07/2012 6:43:16 AM PST by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: FES0844

“That’s why our subways in NYC are crawling with rats.
People who eat & drink on trains & buses should CARRY OUT THEIR TRASH.”

Trash on two feet does not like to carry out their own trash.

Same for trash in a uniform.


37 posted on 02/07/2012 6:44:43 AM PST by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles."...the public interest)
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To: Malsua; wolfcreek
If people weren’t generally ‘trashy’ and took out what they brought in, this wouldn’t be necessary. I agree. I was there in 2010 and while it was pretty clean, I still saw the occasional water battle or other trash laying around. I don't understand who does this. I suspect this really won't have much affect on the trash left behind as people will just pack it in and leave it anyway.

It is the same people that I witness on a regular basis that stand at a postcard view of the ocean then flick their cigarette into the oncoming wave. Or they drive some type of hybrid with an "Earth First' sticker and flick their cigarette right out the window.

38 posted on 02/07/2012 6:46:22 AM PST by New Perspective (Proud father of a 8 yr old son with Down Syndrome and fighting to keep him off Obama's death panels.)
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To: HIDEK6
In my experience, libby tree-huggers are the problem.

Yeah, read this and tell me this ain't based on liberal eco-nut viewpoints instead of an effort to find a practical way to deal with any actual underlying problem from trailside litter:

“A lot of careful thought went into this plan and its implementation,” said Director Jarvis. “I applaud Grand Canyon National Park for its efforts to reduce waste and the environmental impacts created by individually packaged water. This is another example of The National Park Service’s commitment to being an exemplar of the ways we can all reduce our imprint on the land as we embrace sustainable practices that will protect the parks for generations to come.”

39 posted on 02/07/2012 6:46:53 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: SJackson

Good.

I hate throwaway plastic water bottles. They are the biggest marketing “scam” (for lack of a better word) of my lifetime. Huge companies selling bottled NJ tap water at a 3000% markup to idiots. I’ll never understand it.

I love when people complain about $3.80 gas - extracted from the earth from thousands of miles away using high technology, transported, refined, transported and taxed - while sipping a $1.89 pint of tap water. do the math what that tap water - which is close to free in most of our country - costs per gallon.

If idiots don’t bring water/containers and decide to set off on a hike (how many tourists actually hike at the Grand Canyon anyway? 4% tops?) then screw ‘em.


40 posted on 02/07/2012 6:48:27 AM PST by whattajoke (Let's keep Conservatism real.)
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To: SJackson

If the park were privately operated, we wouldn’t have to worry if this decision made sense.


41 posted on 02/07/2012 6:49:19 AM PST by Atlas Sneezed (Author of BullionBible.com - Makes You a Precious Metal Expert, Guaranteed.)
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To: SJackson

It seemed like the article was more concerned about landfill than litter. Nonetheless; how about this?

Sell bottled water to those who are unprepareed with a $5.00 deposit on the bottle. I guraantee that bottle will come back. If not today, then tomorrow.


42 posted on 02/07/2012 6:51:25 AM PST by super7man
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To: dirtboy
Interesting solution which nobody seems to have thought of - because nobody puts $0.50 refunds on intended-for-trash bottles. Not unreasonable, just not something people think of.

I'm not seeing conspiracy here, just frustration at the amount of trash left around and the desire to do _something_ obvious & easy to at least reduce the problem a bit. "Stop selling disposable plastic bottles" is the first easy obvious step.

So be a capitalist and offer the NPS your solution: you'll operate the $0.50 refund plan, and give them a fair cut of the profits.

43 posted on 02/07/2012 6:51:35 AM PST by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: SampleMan
They should at least offer affordable canteen rigs if that is what they want to push.

LL Bean sells quart Nalgene bottles for ten bucks. I imagine more cheaply-made refillable bottles will cost that much once the tourist-trap concessionare markup is applied.

So a family unaware of the ban on disposable bottles will be looking at ten dollars per liter instead of two to three bucks or so per liter for disposables. Which means a family won't be thinking about taking enough water for a hike, but what they can afford at ten dollars per pop.

Stupid. This does nothing to address bottles brought in from outside the park, and can't. It will end up causing some people to get dehydrated because of the cost per liter of a refillable bottle bought on the spot. Typical liberal shortsightedness, putting their liberal 'sustainability' concepts ahead of the well-being of individual humans.

44 posted on 02/07/2012 6:51:40 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: SJackson

You find those water bottles on the ground, in the bushes, everywhere up there.

Might not be a bad idea, since they can’t seem to get people to realize that the canyon is a place to be respected.


45 posted on 02/07/2012 6:53:00 AM PST by Beowulf9
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To: ctdonath2

They aren’t taking the entire option away from the sight seers, just rearranging the options. Note that you can still purchase a water bottle for $1.99 and refill it as much as needed at the free refill stations.


•Grand Canyon souvenir water bottles cost as little as $1.99 and can be filled over and over again with FREE Grand Canyon spring water. When you refill a reusable water bottle, you save money!


.


46 posted on 02/07/2012 6:53:00 AM PST by deport (..............God Bless Texas............)
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To: ctdonath2
I'm not seeing conspiracy here

I see typical liberal idiocy about sustainability here - from the article:

“A lot of careful thought went into this plan and its implementation,” said Director Jarvis. “I applaud Grand Canyon National Park for its efforts to reduce waste and the environmental impacts created by individually packaged water. This is another example of The National Park Service’s commitment to being an exemplar of the ways we can all reduce our imprint on the land as we embrace sustainable practices that will protect the parks for generations to come.”

47 posted on 02/07/2012 6:53:09 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: MachIV

‘I prefer the term “Conservation.”’

“Conservation” has the word ‘serve’ in it.
“Environmental” has the word ‘mental’ in it.

I’d rather serve than be a mental case!


48 posted on 02/07/2012 6:57:30 AM PST by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: dirtboy

I meant that the libby tree-huggers litter more than most others.


49 posted on 02/07/2012 6:59:36 AM PST by HIDEK6
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To: dirtboy
"That's just brilliant. I guess they don't care that visitors will be dropping from dehydration on the trails in the summertime because they couldn't buy a stinkin' bottle of water for their hike."

If I'm going to the Grand Canyon(or anywhere else) for a hike, I'm not going to count on them selling water at the location. I would bring my own.

50 posted on 02/07/2012 7:02:16 AM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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