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Wyoming prepares to end federal wolf protections
Associated Press ^ | February 14, 2012 | BEN NEARY

Posted on 02/14/2012 11:11:07 PM PST by george76

Wyoming lawmakers appear ready to change the state’s wolf management law to accommodate an agreement that Gov. Matt Mead and U.S. Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar reached last year on ending federal protections for the animals in the state.

Under the agreement, wolves could be shot on sight in much of the state. The Republican governor has made wolf management a priority, saying the animals threaten agricultural interests and other wildlife.

Officials say there are about 300 wolves in the state, and Mead has said the population grows by 10 percent every year.

Under the deal, Wyoming would commit to maintaining 15 breeding pairs and at least 150 animals in the state, including within Yellowstone National Park and the Wind River Indian Reservation. The state would be responsible for keeping at least 10 breeding pairs and 100 wolves outside the park and the reservation.

The agreement calls for wolves to be treated as protected game animals in a flexible zone around Yellowstone but classified as unprotected predators that could be shot on sight in the rest of the state.

(Excerpt) Read more at trib.com ...


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; US: Idaho; US: Montana; US: North Dakota; US: Oregon; US: South Dakota; US: Washington; US: Wyoming
KEYWORDS: doggieping; wolf; wolves

1 posted on 02/14/2012 11:11:16 PM PST by george76
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To: jazusamo; girlangler; Flycatcher; SierraWasp; proud_yank; GladesGuru; LucyT; Troublemaker; ...

Idaho and Montana already are immune from a legal challenge by Congress.

Wyoming needs the legal immunity from Congress, too. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife played games last time


2 posted on 02/14/2012 11:17:59 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

Bringing the wolf back into the contiguous United States is one of the most idiotic ideas ever conceived by anyone from the human race. Future generations will undo this insanity.


3 posted on 02/14/2012 11:23:50 PM PST by microgood
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To: microgood

Scientists now classify the domestic dog and the wolf in the same genus. Is “wolfness” something that could be bred back into dogs, if it was at one time bred out of wolves to get dogs?


4 posted on 02/15/2012 12:03:15 AM PST by HiTech RedNeck (Sometimes progressives find their scripture in the penumbra of sacred bathroom stall writings (Tzar))
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Scientists now classify the domestic dog and the wolf in the same genus. Is “wolfness” something that could be bred back into dogs, if it was at one time bred out of wolves to get dogs?

I do not know. Wolves are pack animals that feed off each other in violent ways and I know that is somewhat reproducible with packs of domestic dogs. Maybe if you mixed domestic dogs with wolf packs you could achieve something like that but the domestic dogs would probably not survive long in that environment.
5 posted on 02/15/2012 12:20:11 AM PST by microgood
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To: george76

Under the deal, Wyoming would commit to maintaining 15 breeding pairs and at least 150 animals in the state, including within Yellowstone National Park and the Wind River Indian Reservation. The state would be responsible for keeping at least 10 breeding pairs and 100 wolves outside the park and the reservation.

The agreement calls for wolves to be treated as protected game animals in a flexible zone around Yellowstone but classified as unprotected predators that could be shot on sight in the rest of the state.

Yellowstone should not get a government pass. Wolves and wolf packs are decimating not only the Yellowstone elk population, but a good bit of buffalo, cow calf, sheep lamb population outside the park. I agree with other posters that the reintroduction of wolves, was insanity on parade.

Long nose environmentalists desire for expanding wilderness areas in this country, is more of the same. It is all part and parcel of the Gospel of Green, and while basking under the protective blanket of the Constitution of the United States, they will ever be attempting to undermine the vision of the founders and the efforts of our forefathers to make this place habitable for man.

Human activities and the raising of Livestock are both incompatible with an active wolf population IMHO. The same goes for mountain lions uncontrolled that is.

Good to see WY at least attempting to control the federal leviathan. The more states so engaged, the less we the people will be bothered by overreaching government.


6 posted on 02/15/2012 12:44:20 AM PST by wita
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To: george76

From...

http://www.colorado.edu/conflict/full_text_search/AllCRCDocs/94-65.htm

As early as 1877, wolf hunters used strychnine-poisoned ungulate carcasses to kill wolves in Yellowstone National Park (Weaver, 1978: 7). Federal efforts to eradicate the wolf escalated to such a degree that an estimated 80,000 wolves were killed in Montana alone between 1884 and 1918 (Dawidoff, 1992: 40). By trapping, poisoning and shooting, Animal Damage Control, the federal anti-wolf hit squad, was able to wipe out virtually every wolf native to the United States in a few short decades.

Reminds me of the plight of buffaloes along with the Indians.


7 posted on 02/15/2012 1:04:30 AM PST by Razzz42
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To: george76
Saw a large wolf (black) coming out of the woods early this evening.

The last one I saw was almost two years ago, three of them. They had just killed a deer on the beach and were tearing it apart.

I don't care for them at all, and if the situation permits, I shoot.

8 posted on 02/15/2012 1:05:05 AM PST by gettinolder (Smashed lips save ships.)
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To: wita
I like wolves.

They make great pelts.

9 posted on 02/15/2012 1:29:34 AM PST by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman

I still have a military issue parka, with a real wolf ruff. I bought it at the surplus store, I didn’t swipe it. If you have noticed, pc military today, uses crap that doesn’t do what animal/wolf hair does for one, in cold weather. Managing wolves would again provide natural and useful ruffs for all the parkas one could make.

Wolf fur coat, beautiful!


10 posted on 02/15/2012 1:45:51 AM PST by wita
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To: gettinolder

“I think one of the greatest intentional and continuing mistakes of the Federal Government has been paying an indigenous people not to assimilate”.

Not to hijack a thread, but for an Alaskan with Indian blood, that is a very true and most profound statement if I may quote and complement you. I live not far from one of the poorest reservations, in the US.

Sad I ever left Fairbanks AK, but duty and my country, called.

PS, Speaking of wolves, seen any native Alaskans with synthetic ruffs on their parkas?


11 posted on 02/15/2012 1:54:45 AM PST by wita
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To: george76

The right thing to do is shoot every one you possibly can.

The wolves, not the feds.


12 posted on 02/15/2012 2:34:46 AM PST by Iron Munro ("Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight he'll just kill you." John Steinbeck)
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To: Iron Munro

To: george76
Bringing the wolf back into the contiguous United States is one of the most idiotic ideas ever conceived by anyone from the human race. Future generations will undo this insanity.

You are sooooooo right on this one! I live right next to a Federal wildlife Refuge where wolves were introduced not too long ago. At one time, the refuge (Necedah National Wildlife Refuge) was known for its excellent wild game and in particular, deer hunting. (Shakespeare bow manufactures even named one of the hunting bows after the refuge.) Well, hunting is NOT SO great any longer. There are VERY FEW deer here. Wolves have literally eaten themselves out of house and home. Coyotes too are on the decline as wolves eat them as well. To my knowledge and conversations with the locals, any wolf seen off the refuge is/has been pretty much fair game. There has been a lot of “s,s & s” but the wolf population continues. Now that the state has introduced a season on wolves, perhaps a dent will be made but I have my doubts.


13 posted on 02/15/2012 4:05:53 AM PST by DaveA37
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To: george76
Idaho and Montana already are immune from a legal challenge by Congress.

Wyoming needs the legal immunity from Congress, too. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife played games last time

They already have, it is called the Constitution. Where in the Constitution does the federal government have any authority to dictate to the states about animal control?

14 posted on 02/15/2012 4:28:30 AM PST by Petrosius
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To: george76

Each gray wolf kills about 40 animals (deer, moose, elk, antelope, etc.) a year. It only eats a couple dozen of the ones it kills. The others are killed just for the sport of it. Not only that, but the threat keeps animals away from their natural feeding and breeding grounds and puts pressure on females which negatively affects fertility and gestation.

This killing machine has no natural enemies. Seems this is about to change as ID and MT have also moved to check the population. WA is also considering measures.


15 posted on 02/15/2012 6:12:00 AM PST by randita
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To: microgood; Progov; george76; wita; gettinolder; Petrosius; randita
Bringing the wolf back into the contiguous United States is one of the most idiotic ideas ever conceived by anyone from the human race. Future generations will undo this insanity.

The situation with wolves is another of endless dictates from influential elites and the "experts" in the government (especially the feds) who think they know what is better for everyone else.

Common sense and the constitution be damned! They are going to instruct us how to live every minute of our lives.

The oppression is truly becoming unendurable!

Each day there is something new from these people - sending kids home from school because they don't like the lunch mom packed, forcing taxpayers to pay for birth control and abortions against their beliefs, constantly chipping away at the second amendment, financing militant Islamic groups with tax money extorted under threat of fines and incarceration, ever increasing "wealth redistribution" from people who earn their way to the moocher classes, 20,000 drones to watch our every movement from the sky!

There is no end to it and it's not just Obama and his followers, although he is the worse yet. It is, and has been, both republicans and democrats who think they know better than individual Americans where we should live, how to raise our children, how we should each live, eat, sleep, love, use the toilet, travel, and spend what little money they haven't already stolen from us and our grand-kids to enrich their pals and supporters.

Even on a sunny day there is a dark cloud of oppression hanging over our heads.

The powder keg is going to explode one of these days, probably sooner than later.


16 posted on 02/15/2012 8:27:05 AM PST by Iron Munro ("Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight he'll just kill you." John Steinbeck)
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To: george76
Here's the kicker at the end of the article:

Wyoming has good reason to be concerned about the prospect of legal challenges to its delisting plan if it doesn’t get the legal immunity from Congress. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife a few years ago approved a similar delisting agreement with the state only to repudiate it shortly afterward when a federal judge expressed concern in a lawsuit brought by environmental groups that it wouldn’t provide adequate protection for wolves.

It's a three-fronted war to delist the wolf. The state of Wyoming has to fight the tyrannical Feds, activist judges, and the tree-hugging Left.

Godspeed to them!

Thanks for the ping, George. I'm confident Wyoming will eventually succeed in this.

17 posted on 02/15/2012 8:34:41 AM PST by Flycatcher (God speaks to us, through the supernal lightness of birds, in a special type of poetry.)
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To: Iron Munro
Good post.

My thoughts too.

18 posted on 02/15/2012 8:37:20 AM PST by Flycatcher (God speaks to us, through the supernal lightness of birds, in a special type of poetry.)
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To: Flycatcher; george76
It's a three-fronted war to delist the wolf. The state of Wyoming has to fight the tyrannical Feds, activist judges, and the tree-hugging Left.

Very well said, your statement is succint and so true.

Under the agreement, wolves could be shot on sight in much of the state.

This is what screwed Wyomings deal up last time and am glad to see they're sticking to their guns.

All states with a wolf population should have the same clause in their wolf management laws. There's absolutely no reason for people to hava to learn to live with a wolf population.

I suspect many wolves are smart enough to realize where they get shot at and killed and where they don't, well maybe. At least the ones that strayed out of the no shoot areas wouldn't be a problem for long.

19 posted on 02/15/2012 9:07:58 AM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: Flycatcher; george76
It's a three-fronted war to delist the wolf. The state of Wyoming has to fight the tyrannical Feds, activist judges, and the tree-hugging Left.

Very well said, your statement is succinct and so true.

Under the agreement, wolves could be shot on sight in much of the state.

This is what screwed Wyoming's deal up last time and am glad to see they're sticking to their guns.

All states with a wolf population should have the same clause in their wolf management laws. There's absolutely no reason for people to have to learn to live with a wolf population.

I suspect many wolves are smart enough to realize where they get shot at and killed and where they don't, well maybe. At least the ones that strayed out of the no shoot areas wouldn't be a problem for long.

20 posted on 02/15/2012 9:09:06 AM PST by jazusamo (Character assassination is just another form of voter fraud: Thomas Sowell)
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To: AnAmericanMother; Titan Magroyne; Badeye; Shannon; SandRat; arbooz; potlatch; ...
WOOOF!

The Doggie Ping list is for FReepers who would like to be notified of threads relating to all things canid. If you would like to join the Doggie Ping Pack (or be unleashed from it), FReemail me.

21 posted on 02/15/2012 9:15:34 AM PST by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: wita
Ain't that the truth?

I've often thought that if the wolf lovers really want to ensure perpetuation of the species, the best way would be to allow wolves to be raised commercially on ranches.

You could get a twofer by charging hunters to come in for the harvest and giving them the option of getting paid for the pelts they bring in or letting them keep the pelts as long as they paid the ranch operation for the tanning.

There is actually some data on elephants about how two African countires have taken polar opposite approaches. I'm not sure which the two are, but lets call them K and B.

K takes a strict approach which allows no hunting and no trade in elephant parts, be they skin, tusks or meat. Any such poaching harvests are destroyed when seized. Still, poaching is rampant and the elephant herds are declining.

B takes a controlled harvest approach. Licenses and tags are required. Any trade in elephant parts are monitored to ensure they were properly harvested. The herds are growing and the resulting revenue from growing tag sales are increasing effective policing of the program.

No reason we couldn't take the same approach as B with wolves.

22 posted on 02/15/2012 10:51:45 AM PST by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman

Well, yes, but you have people like Pricilla Feral of the Friends of Animals who would not like your idea one bit. And there’s a good change the govt would be on her side...


23 posted on 02/15/2012 1:40:33 PM PST by brytlea (An ounce of chocolate is worth a pound of cure)
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To: Vigilanteman

Research, reality, results. Gotta love it, unless you are overrun by those to whom nothing matters but ones feel good feelings on the subject. Which IMHO is just more of that religion of the LNB, and the doctrine of usurpation. That would be the long nose busybodies that desire a shared monarchy between themselves and members of the animal kingdom against those who believe God gave to man, knowledge of the real KING, and, dominion over his environment.


24 posted on 02/16/2012 2:10:21 AM PST by wita
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To: Iron Munro
Even on a sunny day there is a dark cloud of oppression hanging over our heads. The powder keg is going to explode one of these days, probably sooner than later. Amen, Brother. Amen. TC
25 posted on 02/16/2012 3:41:46 PM PST by Pentagon Leatherneck
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To: wita
Thank you for your service to our country.

Regarding ruffs on parka's, haven't seen much of any real or synthetic ruff here in SE Alaska. My time in West Alaska, I purchased a "Mulukayak" (phonetic spelling, Yupik), which is a fur hat. Mine is made of Spotted Seal and Beaver. The warmest hat I have ever owned, they are common, and the only thing to keep your head warm zipping along on a snow machine when it's 40 below.

That hat is now 28 years old and I still remember giving a young native woman $150.00 for it. She had tried to sell it in Bethel and was returning to her village Kwethluk I think, a little discouraged.

26 posted on 02/17/2012 9:18:31 AM PST by gettinolder (Smashed lips save ships.)
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