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Nine months in trade school. Job guaranteed.
cnn.com ^ | 3/14/2012 | Parija Kavilanz

Posted on 03/18/2012 8:37:41 AM PDT by RoosterRedux

As millions of young Americans struggle to land jobs, students in manufacturing trade schools are sitting in a sweet spot. They're being hired even before they graduate.

Two weeks ago, students from the manufacturing program in Chicago's Wilbur Wright-Humboldt Park vocational college attended a local job fair.

"Five of our students were hired in just one day," said lead instructor Bryant Redd. The new hires are from a class of 41 students who are still four months away from completing a nine-month advanced certification program in computerized numerical control (CNC) machining. In the program, students go beyond basic machining with classes in computer design, machine shop technology and machine shop math.

Manufacturers in the Chicago area are busier than ever lately, and they're "begging" for more workers trained in advanced manufacturing skills like CNC machining, said Redd.

It's not just in Chicago. Factory work has picked up considerably nationwide, making skilled workers a valuable commodity, said Marc Smierciak, associate dean of instruction at the vocational college.

(Excerpt) Read more at money.cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: tradeschool
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To: Hot Tabasco

Sorry, Project Hope = Focus Hope


51 posted on 03/18/2012 10:34:41 AM PDT by Hot Tabasco (The only solution to this primary is a shoot out! Last person standing picks the candidate)
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To: DManA
How long does it take to train someone to operate one of those?
Depends on the size of the baseball bat the instructor uses ;^) - - seriously, I think the course is two years.

Look up CNC training on your search engine. There are varying levels of proficiency, of course.

52 posted on 03/18/2012 10:43:11 AM PDT by gortklattu (God knows who is best, everybody else is making guesses - Tony Snow)
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To: DManA
How long does it take to train someone to operate one of those?

There's much more to running a CNC then this stupid article implies. You have to be able to read and understand engineering blueprints too....All of the above is usually contained in an approved Tool and Die apprenticeship. To qualify for a UAW Journeymans card, you have to have served in a qualified journeyman's program which is a minimum of 4 years work experience and schooling. I say 4 years but it's actually hours based - 8000 hours (or provide letters of employment substantiating 8 years working in the trade). With overtime, many guys can get their card in around 3 years as long as they've also taken all the applicable classes.

53 posted on 03/18/2012 10:45:07 AM PDT by Hot Tabasco (The only solution to this primary is a shoot out! Last person standing picks the candidate)
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To: RoosterRedux

Well, after finding the following list, I take back everything I have said. Obviously we have no need for people that can fix things. What will propel us into a leadership role in the 21st century is people that have skills in these crucial subjects:

1. “The Phallus”

Occidental College. A seminar in critical theory and social justice, this class examines Sigmund Freud, phallologocentrism and the lesbian phallus.

2. “Queer Musicology”

UCLA. This course welcomes students from all disciplines to study what it calls an “unruly discourse” on the subject, understood through the works of Cole Porter, Pussy Tourette and John Cage.

3. “Taking Marx Seriously”

Amherst College. This advanced seminar for 15 students examines whether Karl Marx still matters despite the countless interpretations and applications of his ideas, or whether the world has entered a post-Marxist era.

4. “Adultery Novel”

University of Pennsylvania. Falling in the newly named “gender, culture and society” major, this course examines novels and films of adultery such as “Madame Bovary” and “The Graduate” through Marxist, Freudian and feminist lenses.

5. “Blackness”

Occidental College. Critical race theory and the idea of “post-blackness” are among the topics covered in this seminar course examining racial identity. A course on whiteness is a prerequisite.

6. “Border Crossings, Borderlands: Transnational Feminist Perspectives on Immigration”

University of Washington. This women studies department offering takes a new look at recent immigration debates in the U.S., integrating questions of race and gender while also looking at the role of the war on terror.

7. “Whiteness: The Other Side of Racism”

Mount Holyoke College. The educational studies department offers this first-year, writing-intensive seminar asking whether whiteness is “an identity, an ideology, a racialized social system,” and how it relates to racism.

8. “Native American Feminisms”

University of Michigan. The women’s studies and American culture departments offer this course on contemporary Native American feminism, including its development and its relation to struggles for land.

9. “’Mail Order Brides?’ Understanding the Philippines in Southeast Asian Context”

Johns Hopkins University. This history course — cross-listed with anthropology, political science and studies of women, gender and sexuality — is limited to 35 students and asks for an anthropology course as a prerequisite.

10. “Cyberfeminism”

Cornell University. Cornell’s art history department offers this seminar looking at art produced under the influence of feminism, post-feminism and the Internet.

11. “American Dreams/American Realities”

Duke University. Part of Duke’s Hart Leadership Program that prepares students for public service, this history course looks at American myths, from “city on the hill” to “foreign devil,” in shaping American history.

12. “Nonviolent Responses to Terrorism”

Swarthmore College. Swarthmore’s “peace and conflict studies” program offers this course that “will deconstruct ‘terrorism’ “ and “study the dynamics of cultural marginalization” while seeking alternatives to violence.


54 posted on 03/18/2012 10:45:43 AM PDT by I cannot think of a name ( i)
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To: wally_bert
good for you!

electronics anymore is more of a troubleshooting position that will require basic electronics theory/classes with electronic testing equipment, with FRU's "field replaceable units" as the normal repair part of the position and problems are usually fairly easy to trace, unless you are talking about trouble shooting/repairing boards that is

robotics, unless you are coding them, will require classes again in electronics using testing equipment and pneumatics theory/class again mostly with FRU's as the normal repair function

CNC on the other hand, unless using CAD and writing programs, will be more involved and cover all aspects of machining technology as you will need to learn at minimum, metals/speed&feeds and cutting/turning/milling/drilling/grinding/EDM/ECM machining theory to be able to set up, run and tear down jobs

best of luck

55 posted on 03/18/2012 11:11:29 AM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: autumnraine
I was doing some reading of the American Welding Society. It seems skilled labor in Michigan, especially west Michigan, is in short supply.

When the down turn hit, Michigan was hit fast and hard. After 2-3 years, people started leaving for other areas. Today, as some jobs have picked up, the people who would have been there to fill them are no longer there.

I have relatives on the west side of Michigan, who whine and complain about how bad things are. They are all unskilled labor. I tell them to go out and learn a skill. They don't understand that when you're unskilled, you have to compete with all the other unskilled laborers for the limited jobs. But a skilled laborer does not have to compete against unskilled labor for a skilled labor job. But also, that even when skilled labor jobs are in short supply, skilled labor can ALWAYS do what the unskilled labor does, thereby creating more competition for the unskilled. Plus, skilled labor in general, has better learning ability and aptitude and work ethic or practices than unskilled.

If somebody is unskilled, there is generally a reason for that. Such as lack of motivation or lack of aptitude. If a person doesn't have the motivation to improve their own life, why would an employer ever think they'll have the motivation to work well. Likewise aptitude. If a person shows a lack of aptitude to become skilled, who will an employer want to hire, someone with or without a skillful aptitude?

I have always told my cousins, that while they were complaining about no work in there area, I could go there and have a job within a few weeks. And probably at better pay.

7 years ago, things were slow in my trade. I went to Manpower, in my area, looking for a welding job, because before I got into the trades I was a welder in factories, and I needed the work.

Put my resume in to Manpower, and had 2 calls for interviews before I got home (a half hour later).

Went to ONE interview. I was hired strictly from my resume and my interview with the shop foreman. He didn't even ask to see one of my welds.

I started on a Monday. The "main guy" who was traing me went on vacation on Wednesday. The foreman was worried that I'd have problems while the other guy was away. Thursday morning the foreman was amazed that I was matching the production of his "main guy" who had been there 13 years. Thursday and Friday the foreman was talking about the home office in Sweden, and sending me to Sweden and learning to be a field troubleshooter. Friday, at the end of the day, he wanted to know if I liked it there, and if I wanted to stay. He wanted to buy my 3 month Manpower contract out, which would have made me a direct employee of the company, with an immediate $2 an hour raise, with reviews after 3, 6 and 12 months, and potentials of up to another $10 an hour after the year.

I got a call that Saturday for a pipefitting job, and left the shop.

The point being, there are jobs out there, for welders, machinists, CNC operators, electricians. Skilled labor. It might not be close by. But for the motivated, the work is out there.

Speaking of work not close by. My current job is about 120 miles round trip, working 10 hours a day.

Back to one of my "unskilled" relatives. I've got a cousin who is 4 months older than me (I'm 49), and she has never had a real job, just babysitting kids. Her middle child graduated HS last year and is going to the local community college to become a social worker. My cousin is on welfare, and was telling me she could have gotten more $$ if her daughter, who is going to school "full time" would also be working x amount of hours also.

My cousin complained that her daughter was going to school "full time" and therefore couldn't work. I explained to my cousin, that I went to school "full time" and also worked 30-40 hours a week and 50-60 during breaks. And that all my buddies that I went to school with, were also "full time" and worked jobs.

The point being, that there is OFTEN (not always) a certain mentality that goes along with being unskilled labor. At least my cousins daughter has SOME motivation to become skilled at something.

We'll see what the future holds though. I just met her first real boyfriend at Thanksgiving. He's cut from the same mold as my cousins, and currently without a job. (As there are NO JOBS there). They had been dating about a month, when I met her boyfriend, at Thanksgiving. About Christmas I found out she was pregnant.

I'm figuring if going to school "full time" and working are too hard, then being pregnant and going to school are going to be even harder. Forget school when the baby arrives.

Oh...and Daddy still doesn't have a job.

In the wise and prophetic words of the great sage John Wayne:
Lifes Hard...
Its even harder when you're stupid.

56 posted on 03/18/2012 11:20:18 AM PDT by mountn man (Happiness is not a destination, its a way of life.)
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To: Hot Tabasco

How much of that is necessary and how much is it keeping competition thin? (Not being argumentative, I’m sure you know much more about this than I do).


57 posted on 03/18/2012 11:24:29 AM PDT by DManA
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To: Hot Tabasco

How much of that is necessary and how much is it keeping competition thin? (Not being argumentative, I’m sure you know much more about this than I do).


58 posted on 03/18/2012 11:24:37 AM PDT by DManA
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To: Hot Tabasco
I've got relatives in western Michigan, who are all unskilled.

I've got a cousin who has a son, who went to the local community college to learn welding. When I'd be up there, my relatives would all tell me how ----- was going to school to learn welding, just like me.

Oh, we tried to talk "shop", but something never seemed quite right.

Today, he has no job. It seems he has back problems, that prevent him from working, though a doctor hasn't confirmed that.

From my other cousins, it seems that ----- only went to school for welding, for some unemployment or welfare training, to keep the checks coming.

59 posted on 03/18/2012 11:30:05 AM PDT by mountn man (Happiness is not a destination, its a way of life.)
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To: RoosterRedux

Takes 3 weeks to train for professional truck driving and some trucking outfits will pay to learn. Worked for me. Good money can be made.


60 posted on 03/18/2012 11:34:17 AM PDT by bikerman (you can take the man out of the jungle but can't take the jungle out of the man)
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To: central_va
"Janitors and housecleaners make $20.00 hour."

As with many things in life, it depends on location. In the south, excluding Florida cities, you are going to make minimum wage being a janitor and maybe $10/hr. cleaning house if you do it privately. If you are a maid at a motel/hotel, you will make maybe slightly more than minimum wage.

I talked to a lot of people in resort areas in SW Montana last month, and there is nothing paying $20 anywhere. Met a young lady with an engineering degree waiting tables, and several young men making $12 at a ski resort, that came to the area with their wives who are teaching.

61 posted on 03/18/2012 11:35:55 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: Plumberman27
I've been a pipefitter for almost 24 years.

If I remember correctly, I was still an apprentice when I realized architects and engineers needed to be working in the field at least 5 years before they should ever be allowed to design or draw something.

62 posted on 03/18/2012 11:37:25 AM PDT by mountn man (Happiness is not a destination, its a way of life.)
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To: MissMagnolia

“having a ‘working with your hands’ skill has been something our society has been losing, to our detriment.”

And do you know why that happened?

Because “working with your hands” IE: a trade,or a SKILL became looked down upon.

For love or money I could never figure out why that was.

Any half wit can graduate college if all they can do is read and write.

But to have an actual marketable SKILL takes hard work, talent, practice AND brains.


63 posted on 03/18/2012 11:53:55 AM PDT by Nik Naym (It's not my fault... I have compulsive smartass disorder.)
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To: Hot Tabasco

“To qualify for a UAW Journeymans card,”

Who the hell said anything about working for a damned union?


64 posted on 03/18/2012 12:05:42 PM PDT by Nik Naym (It's not my fault... I have compulsive smartass disorder.)
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To: Nik Naym

I agree with your comment(s). “Back in the day”, the country was largely agricultural. It was a big deal for someone to get ‘off the farm’ and go to college. Not that many folks could do it so those that could were looked up to and respected because they had this higher level of education. As time progressed, college became the norm as opposed to the exception ..... and it began to become the standard for getting a good job while the ‘trades’ slipped to the wayside.

Being ‘smart’ has nothing to do with book learning, in my opinion and from my experience as a supervisor for many years. What I find grossly lacking is ‘common sense’ plus an ability to think for ones self, to figure things out, to be self-sufficient, all of those things that my parents had to be to survive life on the farm when growing up .... both did go on in later years (not straight out of high school), with much sacrifice and hard work, to get through college and attain master’s degrees, dad in engineering, mom in teaching. The difference is that both worked their way through school and they retained the values and skills they grew up with on the farm .... something that just doesn’t happen in this day and age.


65 posted on 03/18/2012 12:19:31 PM PDT by MissMagnolia (Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't. (M.Thatcher))
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To: I cannot think of a name
Now days, with so many single households and the like, young men get almost NO experience with their hands, or how to repair anything.

Congrats for getting your hands dirty at a young age and learning some skills. Yes, it's sad that lots of boys grow without learning skills. My younger daughter helped me build a couple tool sheds, and helped in remodeling a couple rooms. She got quite good at putting up and mudding drywall. While attending her university, she got a job fixing up the university dormitories (over a dozen buildings) for good pay.

She knows more than her husband about remodeling, and after marrying she remodeled his house (including totally gutting and rebuilding the bathroom) with her own hands before they sold it. It sold within a few days of showing. So not only boys can gain something by learning blue collar skills.

66 posted on 03/18/2012 12:28:07 PM PDT by roadcat
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To: wally_bert
Good luck where ever you land!:)
67 posted on 03/18/2012 12:37:27 PM PDT by ladyvet ( I would rather have Incitatus then the asses that are in congress today.)
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To: RoosterRedux
People shouldn't ignore the skilled trades. Given the choice between a young man getting a useless liberal arts degree or learning a trade as a carpenter or electrician, I'd say go for the trade.

I'm not AGAINST liberal arts degrees - I have one myself. But I also had the forsight to minor in comp sci, which was enough to get me in the door 20 years ago.

68 posted on 03/18/2012 1:37:33 PM PDT by Hacksaw (It's too bad Rick had to kill Shane (Walking Dead))
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To: DManA
How much of that is necessary and how much is it keeping competition thin?

I only mentioned the tool and die trade and apprenticeships as an example of one direction a person can go that uses CNC applications and that comes from my experience from working in HR for a Tier 1 auto manufacturer. Actually, it was a confusing and bad example.

Let me try to simplify the gist of the article. It's like me teaching you how to drive then promising you a job as a mechanic in an auto dealership. What I don't tell you is that you will be the guy doing the oil changes.

Learning how to operate a CNC will not get you a high paying job, in fact, it probably won't get you a job at all. That's because a CNC is merely a tool used in parts machining. Other tools you need in your belt to promote your employability are the ability to read blueprints as I stated before and possibly training in CAD CAM.........It's merely the first step in the right direction.

From my personal experience in having to hire skilled trades people for my plant, the number one trade we were most likely looking for were electricians.

If I had a kid who was halfway intelligent but too lazy to go to college and obtain a directionless Bachelors degree in nothing, and he enjoyed using his head and working with his hands, I would point him in the direction of becoming an electrician.

During the process, he of course would be required to take trade courses, likely at a community college, but he could also (hopefully) find a job with private electrical contractors who in good times are always looking for help. He would likely be doing the grunt work but also learning the trade.

There is no lack of demand for electricians in this country, either in the manufacturing sector or the private sector and they are the tradesmen making the top dollar.

69 posted on 03/18/2012 1:46:34 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (The only solution to this primary is a shoot out! Last person standing picks the candidate)
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To: mountn man
From my other cousins, it seems that ----- only went to school for welding, for some unemployment or welfare training, to keep the checks coming.

When I lost my 35 year job back in Nov. of 2006, I drew unemployment for a year while searching for a job which I never could find. (I'm in the suburbs of Detroit, my company was sold and the plant was closed down)

If I had wanted to apply for an extension, the MESC was willing to "retrain" me but since I had scored well on their aptitude test they offered to send me back to college to complete my bachelor degree. That would have required I attend classes on a full time basis.

When that offer was made, I was then 57 years old. That meant that the state was going to pay for maybe two more years of college, at which time I would have acquired my degree at the age of 59.

If an employer wasn't willing to hire me with 35 years of HR experience with a Tier-1 supplier, there is no way in heck anyone would hire me at the age of 59 or 60 knowing full well I would likely retire shortly thereafter.

I turned down the Michigan Employment Security Commission (MESC) offer and contacted the representative of my closed company and told them to start my pension.

That was MY personal experience. I have several other friends who were in the skilled trades and up in age who lost their jobs several years ago and they are going thru the useless process of job retraining.

There comes a point in time where one's age and the investment in their homes makes it impossible for them to sell and relocate (if they can find a job).

70 posted on 03/18/2012 2:17:51 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (The only solution to this primary is a shoot out! Last person standing picks the candidate)
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To: Hacksaw

And I think trades are hot again because, in a time of great unemployment and high student debt, they pay handsomely and are in great demand.

Being able to afford to eat is always “cool.”


71 posted on 03/18/2012 2:18:34 PM PDT by RoosterRedux
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To: Nik Naym
Who the hell said anything about working for a damned union?

I merely used that as an example I am personally familiar with, I had no intentions of offending anyone, ESPECIALLY YOU. Next time I'll check with you first before I make any comments......Is that ok with you?

Take your head out of your ass before you suffocate..

72 posted on 03/18/2012 2:30:50 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (No matter what you post here, someone's going to get pissed off......)
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To: CatherineofAragon

One of our sons who gives me fits due to his academic apathy, is preparing himself for a great future in auto mechanics or even welding. His high school has a ton of tech classes that earn dual credit in the community college. It was the right path for him and will pay off immediately.


73 posted on 03/18/2012 2:38:43 PM PDT by petitfour
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To: metmom
I know many homeschoolers try to decide what to do about high school.

Our kids did their history from readings at home, and some of their English and Literature, but took English Composition, and the hard sciences that required labs at our local Community College. It was a double blessing, because they got both high school AND college credit for their courses.

74 posted on 03/18/2012 2:48:17 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: petitfour
One of our sons who gives me fits due to his academic apathy

We have one of those too. His only interests are wrecking cars and girls.

75 posted on 03/18/2012 2:54:51 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: autumnraine

Look into North Dakota. Lots of work for welders, and just about everything else. It is a boom town, so conditions will be different than in a settled industry, but very profitable.


76 posted on 03/18/2012 4:19:45 PM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: central_va

Thankfully, this particular son is more interested in repairing cars! He has always been interested in fixing things. He also likes to make things like tools and other useful items. As for girls, son does not go out of his way to pursue girls, but they sure do pursue him. It is a concern.


77 posted on 03/18/2012 4:28:42 PM PDT by petitfour
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To: petitfour

Good for him! I wish him much success.


78 posted on 03/18/2012 4:40:52 PM PDT by CatherineofAragon (I can haz Romney's defeat?)
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To: RoosterRedux
Some related links:

The jobs tide threatens an American industrial tsunami (John Ratzenberger)
Free Republic link

Also, at 19:20 in the video below, Mike Rowe briefly talks about declining trade school enrollment and how that is/will affect us:

Dirty Jobs' Mike Rowe on Lamb Castration, PETA, and American Labor
Link to You Tube Video

79 posted on 03/18/2012 5:09:19 PM PDT by beaversmom
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To: mrsmith
She looks very qualified !   :-)
80 posted on 03/18/2012 5:09:34 PM PDT by tomkat (FU.baraq)
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To: RoosterRedux
My brother worked for years as a mechanic. He got so good and fast at it he was making a lot of money. Unfortunately, that was his downfall and the shop he worked for wanted to cut costs by hiring someone with less experience and, therefore, didn't have to pay as much. He's in his 50's now and worked for Bobcat since then, but got layed off from that due to the economy--they had to close the shop. Probably because of his age and experience, he's had a tough time finding another job. Being an auto mechanic is hard work. It's hard on your body, but it was good to him financially. He was able to pay off two houses over the years and buy his last one outright. He technically doesn't have to work now, but he would love to be working again. When someone is used to being a hard worker their whole life, it makes it hard when you are forced to completely stop.

I love the blue collar/working man professions. I love our garbage men. I love it that I can call a plumber up on a Sunday night and he can fix a leaking pipe in our crawl space. I love it that my brother has the know how to put new upper and lower ball joints and control arms on our vehicle. The blue collar man (woman) makes the world go around. They add to my life unlike any college educated lefty parasite on the tax-payer i.e. the political class. God bless our country that we still have these types around; although, they seem to be somewhat of an endangered species. Hopefully, that will change.

81 posted on 03/18/2012 5:31:52 PM PDT by beaversmom
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To: beaversmom
Hahah!

Blue collar people as you call them are not endangered. If they disappeared, the world would collapse upon itself.

We are all blue collared to the extent we work for the love of work itself.

Without work, we die!

God bless you and your brother. Keep on keeping on!

82 posted on 03/18/2012 6:05:35 PM PDT by RoosterRedux
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To: gortklattu
There is a lot of that kind of work going begging around Cleveland as well. Steel and auto and associated industries are hiring. But there are few qualified workers, even though many of them have been on unemployment longer than nine months.(Hint hint)
83 posted on 03/18/2012 6:32:49 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: central_va
Janitors and housecleaners make $20.00 hour

Good! Let them do that then. What's the big deal?

84 posted on 03/18/2012 6:38:57 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: CatherineofAragon
I have a PHD and many years experience and my auto mechanic charges more per hour than I do. And he has lots of business. There is nothing wrong with "blue collar" work. Skilled trades with good business sense are the road to wealth in this darkening age.
85 posted on 03/18/2012 6:43:20 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: mountn man

Thank you!


86 posted on 03/18/2012 7:42:54 PM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: Alberta's Child

You are the second person to tell me that exact employer and area. I see it as a sign...

Thanks!


87 posted on 03/18/2012 7:44:43 PM PDT by autumnraine (America how long will you be so deaf and dumb to the tumbril wheels carrying you to the guillotine?)
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To: I cannot think of a name
Your post also made me realize something else. When I was a kid and opened up electronics they looked like this pic. You could fix almost anything by hand and you learned electronics hands-on. There were also many more moving parts like tapes and turntables. Today's super-slim, sealed, stationary, printed electronics don't give kids a chance to learn about hardware.

Inside the ipad:

88 posted on 03/18/2012 11:20:23 PM PDT by varyouga
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To: mountn man
I agree 5 years minimum in the field before they do anything. You may want to go to Utube and do a search for So you want to be an architect.
89 posted on 03/19/2012 1:19:43 AM PDT by Plumberman27
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To: petitfour
My senior year of HS I had no idea of what I was going to doafterwards.

My buddy's dad took me under his wing and called me up one day. He was taking his son out to the local community college to check out their auto program. I was a young guy who liked cars, it sounded good to me.

SO I started with auto mechanics, but the teachers suggested we take welding courses to be more rounded.

I took a gas welding course and did OK. My teacher suggested I take arc welding, that is was more useful. About halfway through, a lightbulb got switched on, and my skills skyrocketed.

I ended up finishing all but one auto class, and took every welding class available.

Today, I could walk into just about any shop or factory anywhere and handle whatever welding they have.

Instead I work in the trades as a pipefitter, sometimes welding, sometimes not. I have or have held certs in 8 pipe welding skills. From mild steel to stainless to chrome. I have worked on high rises, in steel mills and nuke plants. Currently I'm at the largest construction project in the country, at the BP refinery in Whiting, In.

Providing something major and unforseen doesn't happen, crippling this country, I'll make over $100k.

Oh, by the way. I have been welding for over 30 years now and have been a pipefitter for close to 24.
I still LOVE what I do.

As far as auto goes. I don't really use it at all per se. What I do use about my education in it, is it allows me to think mechanically. To understand how things work. I can figure most things out, because I was taught to be a mechanic, and most things in my world are a form of mechanics, just not auto mechanics.

Good luck to your son.

90 posted on 03/19/2012 2:43:23 AM PDT by mountn man (Happiness is not a destination, its a way of life.)
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To: petitfour

One of my daughters is going to the community college to learn to be a nurse. Two years at the CC and she has her Associates in nursing and can sit for the RN license exam. Then she can go an get her BS in nursing while working as a nurse part time. After that, you can earn your MS in some specialty while you work, get your certification, and make real money.


91 posted on 03/19/2012 5:06:42 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act. - George Orwell)
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To: hinckley buzzard
"I have a PHD and many years experience and my auto mechanic charges more per hour than I do. And he has lots of business. There is nothing wrong with "blue collar" work. Skilled trades with good business sense are the road to wealth in this darkening age."

Completely agree. Hopefully more kids, who've been coddled and indulged, will wake up to this truth and at least consider this path to success.

92 posted on 03/19/2012 8:16:10 AM PDT by CatherineofAragon (I can haz Romney's defeat?)
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To: mountn man

Thank you for posting this! I will share it with my son! He wanted to take the full Welding class this year in high school, but he didn’t have time in his schedule. One of his Auto teachers has been making him learn welding as a part of that class. What my husband loves about what our son has done so far in high school is son’s ability to take a broken metal part of a piece of furniture or whatever and to remake the broken part. Hubby’s office chair broke, and I was all for going out and purchasing a new one. Instead, hubby made our son take it apart and find the broken part. He asked son if son could make a new part. Son said he could. I am sitting in that chair now, and it’s almost as good as new. It also helps that our son is respected by the Auto, Metals, and Welding teachers. They allow him to do whatever he asks to do. He is very fortunate to be in a school that has so many programs on campus that train these skills. His biggest beef with Metals and Welding classes is that they go sooooo slow for him.


93 posted on 03/19/2012 12:30:01 PM PDT by petitfour
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To: RoosterRedux

Thanks for posting! I have given this article to my co-worker for her stepson - who would never make it through college and I am giving this to an 18 year old girl I am mentoring. Her fiancee is working as a cook at Red Robin and if he takes this article seriously it could really impact their lives. They’re both trying to climb out of a bad background.

This is very practical information.


94 posted on 03/20/2012 11:50:41 AM PDT by Aria ( 2008 wasn't an election - it was a coup d'etat.)
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To: Aria
Good to hear, Aria! Best of luck to the girl you are mentoring and friend's stepson!

It's also a great way for college bound kids to pay for their college. My brother worked his way through college (he had previously blown the money my father had set aside). He graduated with good grades (totally out of character) and NO debt...and because he was 25 before he graduated, he was more mature.

95 posted on 03/20/2012 11:57:28 AM PDT by RoosterRedux (Obama: "Will someone rid me of that Nettlesome Newt?")
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