Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Job applicants asked to turn over their Facebook passwords
New York Daily News ^ | Shannon McFarland

Posted on 03/20/2012 7:18:33 AM PDT by bjorn14

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-200201-206 next last
To: bjorn14

A company that wants your Facebook password is a company you NEVER want to work for.


51 posted on 03/20/2012 7:55:15 AM PDT by magritte (Gladys Knight: Mormon Siren?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: concerned about politics
My son and his wife are intelligent professionals, yet they continue to put every detail of their existence on their FB pages....including making postings when they're out to dinner, and details of out of town travels.

I'm really surprised they haven't been booglarized yet.

52 posted on 03/20/2012 7:56:12 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (Carterize Obama in November)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: GOPsterinMA
Only one person capable of coming up with this HR Policy:


53 posted on 03/20/2012 7:56:57 AM PDT by reegs
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: Future Snake Eater

>> Would you hand over your Facebook username and password to a prospective employee?

NO!! Assuming it was the level of hire (junior) that I would ask for his or her password, I’d kick the snotty SOB out of my office so quick his head would be swimming.

(You really don’t get how this works, do you? No wonder there are so many unemployed yutes — I think folks have forgotten HOW to be employed.)

Here’s a hint. Director and VP-level candidates aren’t asked for their Facebook passwords. (At least not at the first interview.)

Dime-a-dozen GenX and Millenial entry-level employees who have an over-inflated sense of their self-worth from too many years of “esteem building” in public schools? Yeah, I’d like to see your facebook, if you don’t mind.


54 posted on 03/20/2012 7:57:35 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

You make it sound as if a business has all the power. The fact is no business survives when they act badly. They need employees. I’ve seen countless companies fold because they were idiots that had bad attitudes and treated people badly. I’ve seen others that got sued out of business. Yours would be one of them. Demanding for such information is a violation of all kinds of laws and would subject yourself and the company to lawsuits that would put you under.


55 posted on 03/20/2012 7:58:56 AM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: Repeat Offender

A facebook page is not a great thing to have.


56 posted on 03/20/2012 7:59:41 AM PDT by Venturer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Marko413

Exactly.

We came to that almost inevitable conclusion, independently, at almost the same time.

It would also be a good, sensible thing to offer the employer. Politely offer to “friend” their own facebook.

They’ll probably refuse, but it’s a sensible position to take. Which in itself could be a good quality to a prospective employer.

Handing over a password, any password, to anyone, ever - shows a number of things to a potential employer.

None of them, good.


57 posted on 03/20/2012 7:59:41 AM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network ("The door is open" PALIN 2012)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: FrankR
If that's not enough, screw them and their job.

I agree.. there is NOTHING on my FB page that would disqualify me in any way from a job. But, it's private information. I don't "friend" any I work with now... and, would never consider giving a prospective employer access.

If the day ever comes when that's required... goodbye to FB for me.

58 posted on 03/20/2012 8:00:36 AM PDT by SomeCallMeTim ( The best minds are not in government. If any were, business would hire them)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: napscoordinator

It could become like a credit rating, no credit is bad credit.


59 posted on 03/20/2012 8:02:06 AM PDT by Rennes Templar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: reegs

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


60 posted on 03/20/2012 8:02:21 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (The Establishment is the establishment.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 53 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

So do you ask for all email addresses and passwords also. When do you do a in house inspection along with a complete background check in which check all acquaintances from the last twenty years. Additionally how can you afford all of this, it must cost a fortune.


61 posted on 03/20/2012 8:02:29 AM PDT by Ratman83
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

“I’d kick the snotty SOB out of my office so quick his head would be swimming.”

And I would sue you so fast your head would spin. You would spend the next $250,000 and 2 years in litigation only to lose and pay up both from personal and corporate funds. See, piercing the corporate veil is easy when the corporation doesn’t sponsor your bad behavior. You lose the corporate protections once you personally act badly. Both would pay heavily. You wouldn’t be the first to suffer such consequences; just another in a long line of know-it-alls that lose in court.


62 posted on 03/20/2012 8:03:02 AM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick
You really don’t get how this works, do you?

I guess I don't. It's one thing to request viewing access to someone's page, but username and password? That's ridiculous.

Here’s a hint. Director and VP-level candidates aren’t asked for their Facebook passwords.

How about managers? Team leaders? When will current employees be required to hand over this information? Personal email username/passwords? Internet browser histories?

63 posted on 03/20/2012 8:03:03 AM PDT by Future Snake Eater (Don't stop. Keep moving!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

Well, where I come from your word and your reputation are important. If you like to push your employees around like a bully then word will get out, news will spread (I am sure it already has) that you are an authoritarian type and like to squash the bugs. Great thing is, the better people will not come to work for you, won’t interview with you, and you will see less and less quality in your perspective employees. Eventually the market will shift again, and you will go begging, and your reputation, your honor, your past treatment of employees will come back to haunt you.

You are correct, it is Market Driven. What kind of market are you building?


64 posted on 03/20/2012 8:03:23 AM PDT by King_Corey (www.kingcorey.com -- Twitter @KingCorey_Com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: GOPsterinMA

>> *I’ll assume that there are 1 or 2 HR-types out there that are competent, but the remaining 99.999999999999998% are worthless.

That’s been my experience, too. However, usually they’re worthless not because they do too draconian a job of vetting potential hires, but because they *don’t* vet potential hires thoroughly enough. They’re too busy making sure that the company is scrubbed clean of un-PC goings-on, and hiring “consultants” to “train” everyone in worthless business fad garbage.


65 posted on 03/20/2012 8:03:43 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: Ratman83

“Additionally how can you afford all of this, it must cost a fortune.”

He doesn’t. He’s just mouthing off.


66 posted on 03/20/2012 8:04:39 AM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 61 | View Replies]

To: Auntie Mame
My daughter’s prospective employer recently asked her for a copy of last year’s W2.

That has been going on in the sales field for years. A new employer wants to make sure you can sell and to make sure you are not all talk. A W-2 tells all.

67 posted on 03/20/2012 8:05:02 AM PDT by trailhkr1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: 1rudeboy

Vodka does not smell, nice try.


68 posted on 03/20/2012 8:05:48 AM PDT by UB355 (Slower traffic keep right)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Future Snake Eater; Nervous Tick
How about managers? Team leaders? When will current employees be required to hand over this information? Personal email username/passwords? Internet browser histories?

Diaries? Personal letters?

69 posted on 03/20/2012 8:06:12 AM PDT by kevkrom (Note to self: proofread, then post. It's better that way.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 63 | View Replies]

To: GOPsterinMA

Agree that there are a lot of dirtbags working in HR. But ‘by ENLARGE?’ Are you freaking KIDDING me? [Hint: the phrase is ‘by and large.’


70 posted on 03/20/2012 8:07:35 AM PDT by gemoftheocean (...geez, this all seems so straight forward and logical to me...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: GOPsterinMA
No matter what position I've held or industry I've worked in, the HR department is the worst part of any organization, bar none.

I have a postulate that says that the further away any part of a business is from an actual customer, the more socialistic and bureaucratic it becomes. HR, IT, and Accounting are typical examples, with HR typically being the worst.

71 posted on 03/20/2012 8:08:24 AM PDT by kevkrom (Note to self: proofread, then post. It's better that way.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick
Therefore when I hire I want to know A-B-S-O-L-U-T-E-L-Y EVERYTHING about that candidate I can POSSIBLY know

The problem with this is that you need to add "LEGALLY ALLOWED" to know, about a prospective candidate. Facebook will give you information, it will also give you information that as a hiring manager, you are not legally allowed to know (in justifying a hire/not hire).

It's a very fine line, and although I agree with you completely, if you have that knowledge, you'd best make sure that your decision to not hire, doesn't reference it a bit. That's a lawsuit waiting to happen.

And here is reason 5012 that I don't have a facebook account. :-)

72 posted on 03/20/2012 8:09:35 AM PDT by RikaStrom (Pray for Obama - Psalm 109:8 "Let his days be few; and let another take his place of leadership.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

“”Here’s a hint. Director and VP-level candidates aren’t asked for their Facebook passwords. (At least not at the first interview.)

Executives are asked for their social media accounts and other information to help ensure no issues arise. Executives by law are a different class of employee and held to a different legal standard. You are obviously just a frustrated junior employee only mouthing off. I have serious doubts that you have ever been in a hiring manager’s position outside of a two person company.


73 posted on 03/20/2012 8:09:39 AM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: magritte
A company that wants your Facebook password is a company you NEVER want to work for.

This will be the norm in several years. Most Fortune 500 companies now do credit and background checks for just regular run of the mill jobs let alone drug testing etc.

People balked at first just like this Facebook deal but now they don't think anything about it.

We are giving away our personal freedoms and privacy way to easily.

74 posted on 03/20/2012 8:10:36 AM PDT by trailhkr1
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 51 | View Replies]

To: CodeToad

>> And I would sue you so fast your head would spin.

You’re living in a delusional world of your own making. If in an interview with VP of R&D you demanded the company’s password and he threw you out for that, you’d sue and win a quarter of a million bucks? ROFLMAO.

Tell you what, you wouldn’t be working for me for long, I can tell. You have an over-inflated sense of worth, an entitlement mentality, and an inability to reason effectively; those traits usually belong to mediocre programmers, not the best ones.

Plus, I note it’s 10AM central time. You’re not posting to FR on your employers’ time, are you? Or maybe you’re unemployed... I’m sorry if so, but I can’t say I don’t see why.


75 posted on 03/20/2012 8:15:09 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 62 | View Replies]

To: Dilbert San Diego
Ya, I wondered about that. What about those of us who don’t do Facebook? Is there an assumption that everyone is on Facebook? I have wondered about this. Is it legal to discriminate against someone in a job based on what is on Facebook?

perhaps one day only non-persons will be without such credentials. Perhaps that day is closing in.

76 posted on 03/20/2012 8:16:03 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (knowledge puffeth; information deludeth.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: CodeToad

My, my, my, we are presumptuous, aren’t we?

You’ll believe whatever you wish.

Bye now. Good luck.


77 posted on 03/20/2012 8:18:03 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 73 | View Replies]

To: trailhkr1

I wish EVERY employer would do this. Why? Because my family life and stability is one of my strengths, and my Facebook page only proves that. Now I’ve known plenty of people throughout my working career who has the home life of a drunken deadbeat Dad tenfold, but with first impressions would probably have the BS skills to do better at an initial interview than I would.

Because if you knew some of these people like I know them, you wouldn’t let them in the door.

Most employers don’t like you talking about family or what your core principles are in a job interview. They just want to know if you can do the job.

Core principles…Why isn’t this important, it’s important to me, why not anyone else?


78 posted on 03/20/2012 8:19:35 AM PDT by skinndogNN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 74 | View Replies]

To: Jewbacca

“We had putzes posting FB pictures from inside nuclear sites.”

I THINK I see the problem here.

What’n’ell are they doing with cameras inside nuclear sites, anyway!!??

We can access facebook, but cannot have a phone, camera, or other electronic devices.


79 posted on 03/20/2012 8:19:41 AM PDT by FrogMom (There is no such thing as an honest democrat!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

Moral: corporations are safe havens for people who cannot make it in the real world.


80 posted on 03/20/2012 8:24:25 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (knowledge puffeth; information deludeth.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: bjorn14
How about a no facebook policy period on company time instead? I hate facebook, but this is worse.

My response is simple. What I do on company time is your business. What I do off of company time is not your business as long as I don't embarrass the company. AOn a separate note, I don't give out my logins or passwords of anything to anybody. All you need to know is that I will not be on facebook during company time. If that's a problem for you, let me know now, and we can conclude this interview as both of our times are valuable.

81 posted on 03/20/2012 8:26:38 AM PDT by Darren McCarty (Time for brokered convention)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RikaStrom

>> Facebook will give you information... you are not legally allowed to know

Not exactly true. There is some information you are not legally allowed to *ask* a candidate.

But there is no such thing as information you are not legally allowed to *know*. If a candidate blurts out their age, sexual preference, and religion in the course of an interview *without you asking*, you now know it.

And as far as “acting upon it”, however known, of course you can. You may not want to jot down in your notes that you’re not hiring them because they’re Presbyterian, but you can sure as heck do it.

Asking for the Facebook password is probably a gray area — sure there may be info in there that you’re not legally able to “seek”, but an employer could always say they aren’t seeking *that* information, they’re seeking something else.


82 posted on 03/20/2012 8:28:09 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 72 | View Replies]

To: ErnBatavia

I have had to advise relatives of stupid postings on their FB that could put them in danger.....me...I would love to play games with people....like say I AM going somewhere, even though I am NOT....etc... (I have a SIL who follows me around on FB, and then reports to her Mommy (my MIL)...luckily my stuff’s mostly political...but, it is interesting to see how people will USE what you post.


83 posted on 03/20/2012 8:28:09 AM PDT by goodnesswins (2012..."We mutually pledge our Lives, our Fortunes, and our Sacred Honor")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 52 | View Replies]

To: bjorn14

Er... No. You can’t have that. Nor am I giving you access to any of my other personal information not directly related to my employment. You do not need to know.


84 posted on 03/20/2012 8:28:22 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (Steampunk- Yesterday's Tomorrow, Today)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: gemoftheocean

Spellcheck didn’t catch it. I have to admit, I’ve been using that for years.

TY for the head’s up.


85 posted on 03/20/2012 8:31:07 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (The Establishment is the establishment.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 70 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

“If in an interview with VP of R&D you demanded the company’s password and he threw you out for that, you’d sue and win a quarter of a million bucks? ROFLMAO.”

Your reading comprehension is that of a typical ADHD. I never said that.


86 posted on 03/20/2012 8:35:13 AM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 75 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick; Repeat Offender
>> Lucky for me, I don’t have a Facebook page.

Neither do I. And I never will.

This here is reason number 1,372.

Same here.
My issue with Facebook, is that its filled with narcisstic tripe and blather.

(Waaaaah) My day sucks (read: please give me a pity party)

(Waaaaah) My job sucks (read: I'm a lazy slug who got talked harshly to by my boss, and I haven't grown up enough to deal with it like an adult)

Or

(Waaaaah) My job sucks (read: I'm a lazy slug Obama voter, that hates working for a living and am pissed that my Obamabucks haven't arrived yet)

YAAAAAAY!!!!! My daughter, Moon Unit just one the preliminary basket weaving competition in her Girl Scout troop. Next week she faces 3 more girls. If she wins that, she might qualify for district, then regionals, then area, then state semifinals, then state, then national regional, then national semi finals.
I wonder if basket weaving is an Olympic event? I'm sure my Moon Unit is good enough. (Read: I'm not now, or ever was good enough to accomplish anything, so I'm living vicariously through my children, that their successes will reflect on me. Please congratulate Me eerr...Moon Unit, on the great job I eerr...SHE did)

Most of this stuff would be fine within a conversation with a friend or a few friends. Instead, its posted for everybody (or at least 627 friends we have...most who are just people we "know" through sombody else) At this point, its not about communicating with FRIENDS, its about shouting to the world "look at me" and wanting the world to shout back "we see you", all under the guise of "friends".

Speaking of "friends", all these friend requests that people get, from people they barely know (or don't know), I think most of these are just to RACK UP the friend count.
"Hey look at ALL the FRIENDS I have."
"I must be popular."
"People must love me."
"Are you impressed with all the friends I have?"..."Don't you want to be my friend to?"
(read: Then your friends can become my friends, and my friends your friends...and then we'll be SuperCool...Yaaaay, Us"

87 posted on 03/20/2012 8:36:37 AM PDT by mountn man (Happiness is not a destination, its a way of life.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: montag813
"Why not just manage a sanitized version of your Facebook account, without the drunken bash pics and Obama-as-witch-doctor posts? This will likely also spell the end for Facebook as a place of open and honest exposure to family and friends."

I do have a facebook page that I created when raiding in World of Warcraft, but it's squeaky clean. Not 1 thing that I'm not proud of so if someone wants to look....shrugs. I have seen facebook pages of people that I wouldn't hire however. See, you can do these things, facebook, twitter, etc if you live your life the right way. I'm not perfect by any means, but I would never post something that would bring me shame before the whole world.

88 posted on 03/20/2012 8:38:22 AM PDT by lwoodham (I am Andrew Breitbart. Don't doubt me on this.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

“...and hiring “consultants” to “train” everyone in worthless business fad garbage.”

LOL!!! Oh God, YES!!! What a collosal waste of time and money!!!

HR is the weakest link, by far. Just terrible.


89 posted on 03/20/2012 8:38:52 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (The Establishment is the establishment.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 65 | View Replies]

To: bjorn14

Invasive. Your boss has no right to read your diary, look at all your private photos, or put a camera in your home. I’d rather starve to death than take such a job.


90 posted on 03/20/2012 8:39:42 AM PDT by Yaelle (Santorum 2012)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kevkrom

That’s an excellent point! Well done!


91 posted on 03/20/2012 8:40:51 AM PDT by GOPsterinMA (The Establishment is the establishment.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 71 | View Replies]

Comment #92 Removed by Moderator

To: Nervous Tick; reegs
Therefore when I hire I want to know A-B-S-O-L-U-T-E-L-Y EVERYTHING about that candidate I can POSSIBLY know.

I know that my company routinely checks applicants' facebook pages. They figure that if someone puts it out there, then it's fair game.

It started, approximately, when an employee "friended" her boss. The employee was not all that smart, and a real party girl. One day, after a weeknight bender, she listed her facebook status as "Sleeping". Curious, her boss went down and checked...... and now she's an EX-employee.

Sez me, however, asking for passwords is going too far. I'd likely tell the prospective employer to get stuffed. Fortunately, I hate Facebook, and all other social networking -type things, so I've nothing to worry about personally.

93 posted on 03/20/2012 8:41:30 AM PDT by wbill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick
Note that the OP isn’t about someone being “discriminated against” for their posts once they were hired (that may well be unlawful). It’s about vetting them DURING the hiring process. It’s hugely important these days to vet any and every way you can, because once you hire them you are sort of stuck with them.

How well we know


94 posted on 03/20/2012 8:44:15 AM PDT by mountn man (Happiness is not a destination, its a way of life.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick
Dime-a-dozen GenX and Millenial entry-level employees who have an over-inflated sense of their self-worth from too many years of “esteem building” in public schools? Yeah, I’d like to see your facebook, if you don’t mind.

Why not have them log in to FB at the interview and step aside so you can browse their profile for a few minutes, and then let them log off? Why should they do the equivalent of giving you a copy of their house key so you can rummage through their house at will?

95 posted on 03/20/2012 8:44:26 AM PDT by Constitutionalist Conservative (I'm a constitutionalist, not a libertarian. Huge difference.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick

Go fish.

I don’t know what makes you so stupid, but it really works.


96 posted on 03/20/2012 8:45:04 AM PDT by CodeToad (I'm so right-wing if I lifted my left leg I'd go into a spin.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 75 | View Replies]

To: skinndogNN

>> Core principles…Why isn’t this important, it’s important to me, why not anyone else?

Core principles are quite important to an enlightened employer. They’re the one thing that cannot be taught. Core principles are often the difference between an employee who stays a year and one who stays a couple decades.

However, they’re also easy to fake at interview time... and so most employers take attempts by employees to emphasize them with a grain of salt. Thirty years or so it was common practice to mention your church, your civic organizations, your spouse and kids on your resume. That’s fallen out of favor.

This is why the Facebook look is so interesting — presumably it gets at the individual’s REAL persona without the “resume theatre” fakery that both sides expect. However, as other posters have already pointed out, the social media persona is subject to being gamed in the same way as a resume can be. Therefore, it’s a temporary employer advantage at best.

I’ll note that a really skilled hiring manager (or better, hiring team) can pretty well tease out a candidate’s true personality without needing passwords or record searches. I got to be fairly good at this — maybe B-/C+ level — but I saw others who were much better than I. In my career I have hired primarily college-trained programmers, engineers, and managers, up through exec staff level. I am sure that hiring in other industries and at other levels is different and I am happy not to be doing it.

Proper hiring is a grueling and time-consuming process for a business, and the stakes are very high — TOO high NOT to put in the required effort.

FRegards


97 posted on 03/20/2012 8:46:19 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 78 | View Replies]

To: Constitutionalist Conservative

>> Why not have them log in to FB at the interview and step aside so you can browse their profile for a few minutes, and then let them log off?

That would probably work too.


98 posted on 03/20/2012 8:47:38 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 95 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick; CodeToad
The lesson here is hiring is market driven.

As an employee or employer, you have to consider factors which are relevant to your career or your business. Following the market makes you a follower, not a leader. I try to be discriminating, because taking the wrong job or hiring the wrong person can be very expensive. From the employers' perspective, wasting time on applicants is a real issue. But if you are willing to bring a person in for an interview, then you should be willing to entertain questions which may be uncomfortable but relevant. for example if a non-disclosure agreement is part of an interview I usually ask to know what I shouldn't disclose. If the employer touts financial success then asking for a glimpse of audited financials is relevant. If an applicant claims experience in a particular area asking detailed questions about it is relevant.

I make a point of not letting my employer constrain my skills so that I do not remain employable or marketable. I make a point of maintaining and acquiring skills which keep me in the upper quartile of desirable applicants.

Employers who want to be market leaders should not hire workers as fungible resources. This creates an intrinsic bias against synergy. The value created by people working together enthusiastically and cooperating is many times greater than what each may accomplish as a replaceable part. Similarly the damage caused by disgruntled workers working at odds with other may be many times greater than a what a single unhappy worker may cause, and it's even worse when the disgruntled people team up against the employer (see unions, heheh).

It is a fallacy to think this does not apply to your special case. History is littered with such failures, they just don't get as much press.

99 posted on 03/20/2012 8:47:46 AM PDT by no-s (when democracy turns to tyranny, the armed citizen still gets to vote)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: wbill

If you hate it so much, why are you posting on FR?


100 posted on 03/20/2012 8:47:52 AM PDT by skinndogNN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 93 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-200201-206 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson