Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Napoleon... the theme park
BBC News ^ | 26 March 2012 | Hugh Schofield

Posted on 03/26/2012 9:25:18 PM PDT by MinorityRepublican

Plans are afoot to build a theme park based on the life and times of the French leader Napoleon Bonaparte. Can it be a tourist magnet to rival nearby Disneyland Paris?

You have heard of Napoleon the emperor, the general, the reformer, the lover. Of the humble Corsican who took destiny by the throat, whose armies marched through Europe, bringing subjugation yet also emancipation.

And how he was stopped at the gates of Moscow, fought a last hurrah at Waterloo, and died in Atlantic exile.

So maybe you will be interested in the latest attempt to memorialise this greatest of Frenchmen. Because coming some time soon at a location not far from Paris, it's Napoleon… the theme park.

Far from being the whim of a madcap entrepreneur, it is an entirely serious project with the backing of government, tourism officials and the Bonaparte family.

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: france; napoleon; park; theme

1 posted on 03/26/2012 9:25:22 PM PDT by MinorityRepublican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

They should build it in San Dimas. He spent a lot of time there.


2 posted on 03/26/2012 9:28:00 PM PDT by Defiant (If there are infinite parallel universes, why Lord, am I living in the one with Obama as President?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

The Hitler theme park will be next.


3 posted on 03/26/2012 9:28:36 PM PDT by TigerClaws
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican
Do you suppose they'll feature a wall-sized version of this graphic?


4 posted on 03/26/2012 9:29:42 PM PDT by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

As one of Polish heritage, I consider Napoleon to be a liberator, as many in Poland do. There is even mention of Napoleon in the Polish National Anthem.


5 posted on 03/26/2012 9:34:50 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator

For obvious geopolitical reasons Poland and France have generally always been allied.

While it is true that Napoleon re-established a Polish state for a time, as with everything he did, it was out of cold, calculating self-interest.

There was an incident in Spain where he callously sent the Polish Lancers into a suicidal attack out of impatience.

Did have a stunningly gorgeous Polish mistress, though.


6 posted on 03/26/2012 9:39:54 PM PDT by Strategerist
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

Or a big sign over the entrance that reads “La Garde recule.”


7 posted on 03/26/2012 10:05:45 PM PDT by vbmoneyspender
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator

If i recall my history correctly it was Napoleon who inspired a movement that would eventually become the American Revolution. The idea that all men are created equal. He was a peasant who destroyed the concept of feudalism by rising to power and conquering the lords and kings of virtually every nation in the world.


8 posted on 03/26/2012 10:09:36 PM PDT by conservativeimage.com (Civil War II)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator
As one of Polish heritage, I consider Napoleon to be a liberator, as many in Poland do. There is even mention of Napoleon in the Polish National Anthem.

Indeed, Mazurek Dabrowskiego (Dabrowski's Mazurka), the Polish national anthem, does mention Napoleon:

Dał nam przykład Bonaparte,
Jak zwyciężać mamy.
(Bonaparte has shown us ways to victory)

9 posted on 03/26/2012 10:12:09 PM PDT by Fiji Hill (Deo Vindice!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

And if a terrorist then bombs its buildings,

(wait for it)

it will be Linoleum Blownapart...

Sorry..


10 posted on 03/26/2012 10:14:00 PM PDT by RightResponse (It depends on what the defamation of Islam is .....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: conservativeimage.com
If i recall my history correctly it was Napoleon who inspired a movement that would eventually become the American Revolution

Napoleon was born in 1769 and although he was certainly a genius I think even he would admit that it was a little bit beyond his powers to be influencing foreign political movements at the age of 7.

11 posted on 03/26/2012 10:14:29 PM PDT by vbmoneyspender
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill
Marsz, marsz, Dąbrowski....
12 posted on 03/26/2012 10:15:18 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: vbmoneyspender

Eep! Thanks.


13 posted on 03/26/2012 10:31:33 PM PDT by conservativeimage.com (Civil War II)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: conservativeimage.com
No problem. By the way, if you are interested in Napoleon my favorite book on him is David Chandler's The Campaigns of Napoleon.

It is a great book that will give you a complete understanding of Napoleon's military genius.

14 posted on 03/26/2012 10:39:35 PM PDT by vbmoneyspender
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

Hmmm. They could feature kiosks selling yummy napoleons...


15 posted on 03/26/2012 11:08:42 PM PDT by married21 (As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Strategerist

He had a Polish wife, the father of the ‘Eaget” Napoleon II.


16 posted on 03/26/2012 11:12:20 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Strategerist

He had a Polish wife, the father of the ‘Eaget” Napoleon II.


17 posted on 03/26/2012 11:16:34 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: conservativeimage.com

Wrong. US Revolution predated French revolution. Thomas Jefferson was US ambassador during part of the Revolution, and contributed to the French Declaration of the Rights of Man.


18 posted on 03/26/2012 11:22:16 PM PDT by donmeaker (Blunderbuss: A short weapon, ... now superceded in civilized countries by more advanced weaponry.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill; dfwgator

I looked this up, since it seemed odd that a devoutly Catholic nation would include such a line about a killer whose enormity led to the collapse of European Christianity, and the slaughter of millions.

Sure enough, it’s true, but Poland’s national anthem comes from a weird historical quirk, which you may have known:

Poland had been conquered, and divided amongst Russian, Prussian, and Austrian Empires. Rather than celebrating a state, the song celebrates the persistance of a nation, in spite of the loss of an independent state. With France at war with Poland’s looters, Polish forces in Italy, which had literally been trained by Napoleon himself, planned a liberating battle.

So, yes, the anthem means not (necessarily) that Napoleon is someone to be emulated in character, but literally that Napoleon taught them combat. Ironically, this song was written long *before* Napoleonic forces briefly reconstituted Poland (1807-1815).


19 posted on 03/27/2012 12:04:50 AM PDT by dangus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: conservativeimage.com

So sad.

In reality, Napoleon was one of history’s greatest murderers, unleashing wild, nihilistic crowds to slaughtered by the millions and destroyed Christianity in Europe. Far from inspiring Washington, Napoleon’s antecedents brutally slaughtered those who had helped Washington.


20 posted on 03/27/2012 12:15:11 AM PDT by dangus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: dangus

As someone once said, the French revolution achieved two results: a pile of headless corpses, and a tyrant ruling France, the tryrant being Napoleon.


21 posted on 03/27/2012 12:38:19 AM PDT by Rummyfan (Iraq: it's not about Iraq anymore, it's about the USA!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

If it ever gets off the ground it will be interesting to see how they handle his final defeat by Wellington at Waterloo. If there was ever any real liberating going on, it was the British Army at that battle liberating europe, and not for the last time either.


22 posted on 03/27/2012 2:28:35 AM PDT by Caulkhead
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: vbmoneyspender

I suppose he was a genius but not in a league with Hannibal or Alexander and his speaches are so full of megalomania I can’t finsh them without wanting to puke.


23 posted on 03/27/2012 3:39:42 AM PDT by bkepley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

Will you have to be taller than him to be allowed on the rides?


24 posted on 03/27/2012 4:33:54 AM PDT by almcbean
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

The two are not even close to alike, and if you think so then you really should brush up on your history.
Prior to Napoleon’s rise to power was the French Revolution and the establishment of the French Republic, which frightened the other european countries as they were all established monarchies and the being afraid that they would be overthrown by their people just as the french overthrew their king made them form the first coalition of great britain, prussia, austria, spain, sardinia and naples. In short, France whooped their asses even while having a civil war and General Bonaparte made all of them surrender with the exception of the british who remained diplomatically against france. In 1798, napoleon was having some fun in egypt and the second coalition was formed with Austria, Great Britain, the Kingdom of Naples, the Ottoman Empire, Papal States, Portugal, Russia, Sweden against France. France suffered defeat until napoleon was able to return in 1799 where he took control of the government, formed the consulate,created military reserves, and in short stomped on the austrians, kicked the russians out of the war and forced the austrians to peace which in turn made the british sign for peace, which was the only time peace was achieved in europe for a long time. Britain then breached the treaty by occupying malta, and the french interfered in swiss politics and the treaty was broken and the 3rd 4th 5th coalitions etc formed with the desire over the course of the wars changing from a desire to stop napoleon to restoring the monarchy. So yeah when I classify good guys and bad guys in a conflict i would rank napoleon in the good guy column and give a big f u to king george.


25 posted on 03/27/2012 4:38:31 AM PDT by hannibaal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: conservativeimage.com
If i recall my history correctly it was Napoleon who inspired a movement that would eventually become the American Revolution.

Your recollection of history, then, is inaccurate. The American Revolution had occurred well before that Corsican hill-bandit written large assumed any power whatsoever in France. It probably occurred before Bonaparte even *spoke* French, as that 'gentleman' didn't speak a word of French until young adulthood...

the infowarrior

26 posted on 03/27/2012 5:58:29 AM PDT by infowarrior
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: dangus

Well, in his favor, he DID turn cannons on nihilistic crowds and give them a “whiff of grapeshot.”

Something we should be doing to rioters both here and in Afghanistan.


27 posted on 03/27/2012 6:21:53 AM PDT by Little Ray (FOR the best Conservative in the Primary; AGAINST Obama in the General.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

I’m trying to imagine what sort of rides they would have at the Napoleon theme park? Maybe a water ride called “Waterloo?”


28 posted on 03/27/2012 6:28:09 AM PDT by Little Ray (FOR the best Conservative in the Primary; AGAINST Obama in the General.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican

"Frankly, we both think that this is a bad idea..."

29 posted on 03/27/2012 6:29:24 AM PDT by GreenLanternCorps ("Barack Obama" is Swahili for "Jimmy Carter".)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: conservativeimage.com; dangus; vbmoneyspender
Napoleon...was a peasant who destroyed the concept of feudalism by rising to power and conquering the lords and kings of virtually every nation in the world.

Unfortunately, Napoleon met his Waterloo--and that resulted in Bonaparte's Retreat.

30 posted on 03/27/2012 12:18:44 PM PDT by Fiji Hill (Deo Vindice!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican
At the refreshment counters, their signature soft drink - A Whiff of Grape
31 posted on 03/27/2012 12:24:22 PM PDT by Jack of all Trades (Hold your face to the light, even though for the moment you do not see.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hannibaal
The two are not even close to alike, and if you think so then you really should brush up on your history.

While Hitler and Napoleon are not exactly alike, it is reasonable to compare the two. It's been done many times before, and Hitler was an admirer of Napoleon who respectfully visited his tomb.

There are many parallels not just between Napoleon and Hitler, but also the French Revolution, the Russian Revolution, and the Nazi rise to power.

32 posted on 03/27/2012 1:49:50 PM PDT by WPaCon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican
The theme park is to be located at Montereau site of Napoleon's last victory in the 1814 campaign in which the old master displayed his operational virtuosity once again. There is a really large statue of Bonaparte in the city. Montereau is also the site of the assassination of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy while meeting the Dauphin of France. This is one of the most dramatic incidents in French history and once was in the last century well known to English readers through being a highlight of Quentin Durwood by Walter Scott, chapter 31 ‘The Interview’. The murder of the Duke of Burgundy had disastrous repercussions for France as the successor immediately allied Burgundy with England. Whether the Dauphin was implicated remains unknown. Considering what a coldly calculating figure the Dauphin was as Charles VII it seems unlikely he would have planned such an obvious folly. In any case this town is famed for dramatic events in French history and would be a good location for such a venue.
33 posted on 03/27/2012 2:38:51 PM PDT by robowombat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill; conservativeimage.com; dangus; vbmoneyspender

Napoleon was of minor nobility, but he was NOT a peasant.

The world did not need Napoleon to rid itself of feudalism. What Napoleon added to the concept of anti-feudalism was merely the very type of savagery and barbarism that made feudalism look good in comparison. 6.5 million dead, millions more raped, tortured or mutilated. European Christianity in utter tatters. Totalitarian states the norm, not the exception. And the nihilism firmly entrenched which brought forth Hitler and Stalin.

If people really knew what Napoleon did, only the most deranged, atheistic perverts could celebrate him. Let’s not forget that he was even a military failure, too hellbent on destruction to even contemplate how to govern his empire.


34 posted on 03/27/2012 2:51:31 PM PDT by dangus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: MinorityRepublican
It would be ironic if this theme park met its Waterloo as Napoleon did. The poor French... they really need to honor a real French hero instead of this guy.
35 posted on 03/27/2012 2:54:36 PM PDT by mtg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill
Unfortunately, Napoleon met his Waterloo--and that resulted in Bonaparte's Retreat.

As well as a hit song for ABBA.

36 posted on 03/27/2012 2:55:26 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: almcbean
Will you have to be taller than him to be allowed on the rides?

Good one.

37 posted on 03/27/2012 2:58:07 PM PDT by eddie willers
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: mtg

They need to build one for Charles Martel.


38 posted on 03/27/2012 2:59:10 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator
ABBA's version of Waterloo is a far, far cry from Stonewall Jackson's.

Bonaparte's Retreat, referenced in Jackson's opus, is a nineteenth-century fiddle tune that composer Aaron Copland incorporated into his 1942 composition "Hoedown." Pee Wee King & His Golden West Cowboys had a hit version of Bonaparte's Retreat in 1950.

39 posted on 03/27/2012 3:37:21 PM PDT by Fiji Hill (Deo Vindice!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: infowarrior

Thanks everyone for your help.


40 posted on 03/28/2012 9:45:08 PM PDT by conservativeimage.com (Civil War II)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson