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Starving for Religion in 'Hunger Games'
Real Clear Religion ^ | March 26, 2012 | Jeffrey Weiss

Posted on 03/27/2012 6:46:41 AM PDT by rhema

The importance of religion in the wildly popular "Hunger Games" books and new movie is a lot like the barking of a dog in the Sherlock Holmes story "Silver Blaze."

Holmes directs a police inspector's attention to "the curious incident of the dog in the night-time." "The dog did nothing in the night-time." "That was the curious incident," remarked Sherlock Holmes.

The dog, of course, did not bark.

If you've been cut off from all popular culture for a while, "The Hunger Games" and its two sequels are novels by Suzanne Collins. She creates a dystopian future where the remnants of the United States are ruled by a despot who enforces his rule with an annual "game" that's a cross between Roman gladiator contests and a modern reality TV show. A couple of people from each province are chosen by lottery to enter into a group battle to the death, all televised. Last person standing is the winner.

Eventually, there's an uprising.

The plot is a gumbo that includes elements from Roman history and mythology; "The Truman Show" movie; Robert Heinlein's 1960s novel "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress;" "The Lottery," a short story written in the 1940s by Shirley Jackson; Madeline L'Engle's "A Wrinkle In Time" and who knows what else.

The core conflicts that drive the plot are moral choices when there are no good answers. And yeah, there's a romance conflict.

For my money, it's better written than the Harry Potter books -- more internally self-consistent with much more sophisticated character development. Like the Potter books, it's marketed as "young adult" fare but includes plenty of adult adults in its fan base. The first movie in what will surely be a series opened last week. Critics were generally kind and the box office was tremendous.

So what about religion? There isn't any. Not a prayer. Not an oath. The word "god" does not so much as appear in any of the books. Nobody even says "oh my gosh."

There's no ritual that isn't totally grounded in some materialistic purpose. Not a hint of serious superstition. Unless I missed it, there's not a remotely idiomatic reference to the supernatural.

The story is plenty busy without it, but such an unequivocal expunging can only have been intentional. We learn fine details about fashion and food and weaponry and the shape of furniture and the color of dust and so on and so on. She easily could have dropped in a couple of casual references to faith.

I've not been able to find any interviews she's granted on the topic, but it's pretty clear that, like Gene Roddenberry did when he created Star Trek, Collins wanted there to be zero religion in her world.

Based on her source material, she could have used religion as a positive or a negative. Here in the real world, people have turned to various kids of religion in the darkest moments of history. Victims of the Nazis prayed in the death camps. On the other hand, religion has been a tool of oppression in much of real history, too. From the imposed state faith of the ancient Roman Empire to the Catholic Inquisition to the Muslim theocrats of our own era, faith has been used by despots whose histories parallel some of the villains of Collins' story.

It's hard for me to imagine a real human future where either use of religion vanishes without a trace. But for her own reasons, Collins went in neither direction. It's a curious incident, a dog that should have barked.

A friend of mine who has read the books asked me a much more interesting question than "where is the religion." Where, she asked me, was God in this story? Had he abandoned humanity?

My friend is a person of deep and abiding faith who has survived some hard times. Her question was heartfelt. I thought about all of the real-world examples in human history where one might ask the same question. Theodicy is the toughest challenge for any religion that posits an all-knowing, all-powerful, all-good deity. Why does he allow evil to persist? Where is his hand in stories where horrors pile upon horrors?

Is God in the world of the Hunger Games? Religious commentators are trying to find him. There's a book titled "The Hunger Games and the Gospel." A paper titled "The Gospel According to ‘The Hunger Games' Trilogy." "Hunger Games" bible studies.

The authors focus on plot elements that turn on moral questions, on discussions about good and evil characters, on redemption and faith in family and friends. Even though there's not a scintilla of actual religion in the stories, they are able to find aspects that represent their own religious values.

Finding the Almighty in apparently secular details has an ancient and honorable history. Look no further than the Bible and the Book of Esther. This is the basis of the Jewish holiday of Purim. The tale includes violence and romance, sexual wiles and betrayal, despots and heroes. (And like the Hunger Games, the central hero is a young woman.)

What it doesn't have, famously, is a single unequivocal mention of God. Not one. Yet it made it into the canon for Jews and Christians. And generations of theologians have delved into it to find religious meanings.

So maybe it is fair to search for God in the world of the Hunger Games. But given how hard Collins worked to scrub her work so squeaky religion-clean, I wonder what she thinks of the bible studies.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: hungergames
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To: Joe 6-pack

Waugh anticipated post-Christian Europe, which could be the theme of “Brideshead Revisited,” one of my favorite TV dramas.


51 posted on 03/27/2012 9:43:23 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey)
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To: KarlInOhio
It was Voltaire. I copy the quote in two languages, provide a source and then forget to answer the original question of who said it.
52 posted on 03/27/2012 9:50:34 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (You only have three billion heartbeats in a lifetime.How many does the government claim as its own?)
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To: Borges

-—Usually Lit is presented as part of a class with a theme - American Lit, British Lit and so forth. It supplies a de facto analysis...a history lesson of what a culture was writing.-—

This means of categorization is like the Dewey decimal system, or alphabetical order. It’s not very informative.

It would be like categorizing religious beliefs by chronological order.


53 posted on 03/27/2012 9:55:47 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey)
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To: discostu

Like David Copperfield?


54 posted on 03/27/2012 9:57:19 AM PDT by Mach9
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To: Borges

Is that the South American tribal chieftan who insists on captives’ reading Dickens to him? (I never remember titles!)


55 posted on 03/27/2012 10:01:19 AM PDT by Mach9
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To: Joe 6-pack

I think I saw that episode. Uhura realizes (I think toward the end) that the sun worshippers are actually Son worshippers, and she explains this to the captain or Spock or somebody. Am I remembering it correctly?


56 posted on 03/27/2012 10:13:32 AM PDT by Starrling
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To: AdSimp
Simple, you don't get to dystopia unless you first purge society of all traces of religion.

Right. Dystopian literature is almost always religion-free.

57 posted on 03/27/2012 10:15:26 AM PDT by Wyatt's Torch (I can explain it to you. I can't understand it for you.)
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To: Mach9

Copperfield sort of touches it because you get the idea that he’s actively telling you the story now. But most of the story is in the past. Most of the time you see present tense it’s in spy stories, it adds a lot of immediacy to the story, especially if it’s first person. First person past tense you always have the nagging feeling that the narrator lived through the current scene because he’s telling you it happened in the past, move it to present tense and the poor slob could die at any time, of course they don’t but it feels that way.


58 posted on 03/27/2012 10:17:27 AM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: Starrling

Yes, you are. Ends with her declaring “...he is the son of God!” A hard-to-find episode.


59 posted on 03/27/2012 10:23:40 AM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: Craftmore
"I saw the movie,took my entire family.I did see God in the good versus evil,The heroine only killing in self defense or in mercy,as she killed the last boy to end his suffering.I saw it in the way she cared for the little black girl.I saw it in the way she prepared a funeral for the little girl,and in the way thar her black partner saved our heroine because of her treatment of the little girl.I saw no sex or nudity anywhere in the movie,and the blood and murder scenes were toned down to the point that you almost wondered if anyone actually died.I dont really even recall any cursing.I saw the way she inspired hope in people,Like a younger Sarah Palin perhaps.I saw her sacrifice herself for her younger sister,and in the way she was able to save both herself and her partner. I saw God,maybe you dont or cant,but I did,and I saw good triumph over evil and inspire hope in a hopeless populace."

Very well said. Whether Hollywood or the author intended to, the film is a conservative tour de force about the evils of a dictatorial central government that oppresses and enslaves its citizens, and the flickering of freedom and the spark that will start a revolt to throw off the yoke of the oppressor. Seems very topical to the US, the Obama Administration,and what conservatives need to do.

60 posted on 03/27/2012 10:30:00 AM PDT by Truth29
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To: Mach9

Yes! But that’s only part of it.


61 posted on 03/27/2012 10:32:04 AM PDT by Borges
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas

A Lit class is like a history class where things are presented in chronological order within the bounds of a certain period or culture. The alternative is what? The teacher picking out material that supports a certain belief system only - inevitably including much inferior material along the way?(left wing teachers actually often do this and that is the result) Or just stuff they like with no relevance to literary significance?


62 posted on 03/27/2012 10:35:46 AM PDT by Borges
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To: AdSimp
Simple, you don't get to dystopia unless you first purge society of all traces of religion.

The writer of the article totally missed a huge part of the 20th Century and totalitarian regimes: Religion competes with the government. If the government wants total control, it either purges religion altogether, creates one that it controls to replace established religions, absorbs it into the government, or relegates it to a small corner until it can be purged.

Look at Nazi Germany - parts of the leadership were trying to replace established religions with a made-up religion that touched on the occult and a bunch of other crazy beliefs.

Look at the Soviet Union.

Look at China.

Look at Cuba - right now the Cuban government is walking on eggshells because of the Pope.

The author of the Hunger Games books is playing coy and claiming that she wasn't trying to do certain things with the books, but I saw the movie this weekend based on the advice of some FReepers and was pleased I did. What I saw was a very savage criticism of Big Government and the MSM. I saw somebody show Big Government at its worst - expressing its total control by removing children from parents, and trying to dictate the lives of all of the citizens.

I believe the author maybe trying to avoid talking about those issues, because the moment she comes out and says it was about destroying Big Government and about the power and depravity of the MSM, Hollywood and the media will immediately try and pretend she and her books don't exist. I am still very surprised that Hollywood would make such a movie. I've heard that the citizens revolt against the government in the latter books and look forward to seeing the movies or reading the books or both.
63 posted on 03/27/2012 10:37:18 AM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: AdSimp
Simple, you don't get to dystopia unless you first purge society of all traces of religion

Exactly.

One of the things the Capital used to keep the people under control was to feed them a carefully measured ration of hope.

If there is religion running rampant then your monopoly on hope goes out the window.

The original basis of the myth is Thesis but the state reminds me greatly of North Korea. Everything is run by the state and the state is run by one man.

64 posted on 03/27/2012 10:42:02 AM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (Would you sing if someone sucked YOU up the vacuum cleaner hose?)
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To: discostu
First person present writing will never get popular with the writers, it’s too difficult and counter intuitive. Series that use it have been popular with readers before, but because so few writers are comfortable with it it never takes off.

See, as a reader/writer myself I disagree. As a writer I can use first person present tense to get a cheap emotional connection that the story or writing don't justify. It bring an immediacy to the story. It's a crutch for a poor story or characters that wouldn't keep my attention.

As a reader it drives me absolutely bonkers - except when it's done incredibly well. I can think of one present tense book I've read in the last ten years that worked, and it worked so well I didn't even realize it was present tense for the first twenty pages, the writing was that good.

It's moot to me, the sort of stories I want to tell need the distance that past tense (and usually third person limited view) can give. But if the new hot thing turns out to be, oh, present tense second person omniscient, I'm out of here.

65 posted on 03/27/2012 10:50:57 AM PDT by JenB
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To: Borges

In an absolute sense, one would choose the best, age-appropriate literature. Of course, what constitutes the best literature is debatable, but the principle shouldn’t be. However, it is not necessary to compile a list of great books because, concomitant with the first principle of choosing good books, is the issue of authority. Ultimately, parents should have the primary responsibility for guiding their children’s education.

There is no solution to this problem with respect to government schools, because they have no formal purpose, although it is possible to discern various de facto objectives.


66 posted on 03/27/2012 11:13:17 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey)
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To: Starrling

Yep. That’s the one.


67 posted on 03/27/2012 11:26:47 AM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: Borges

A compelling defense of “The Hunger Games:

http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DRsFBbS39_z0&v=RsFBbS39_z0&gl=US

My concern with respect to today’s children is along the same lines as the following I found:

A few years ago, a college writing professor, Kay Haugaard, wrote an essay about her experiences teaching “The Lottery” over a period of about two decades.

She said that in the early 1970s, students who read the story voiced shock and indignation. The tale led to vivid conversations on big topics – the meaning of sacrifice and tradition; the dangers of group-think and blind allegiance to leaders; the demands of conscience and the consequences of cowardice.

Sometime in the mid-1990s, however, reactions began to change.

Haugaard described one classroom discussion that – to me – was more disturbing than the story itself. The students had nothing to say except that the story bored them. So Haugaard asked them what they thought about the villagers ritually sacrificing one of their own for the sake of the harvest.

One student, speaking in quite rational tones, argued that many cultures have traditions of human sacrifice. Another said that the stoning might have been part of “a religion of long standing,” and therefore acceptable and understandable.

An older student who worked as a nurse, also weighed in. She said that her hospital had made her take training in multicultural sensitivity. The lesson she learned was this: “If it’s a part of a person’s culture, we are taught not to judge.”

I thought of Haugaard’s experience with “The Lottery” as I got ready for this brief talk. Here’s where my thinking led me:

Our culture is doing catechesis every day. It works like water dripping on a stone, eroding people’s moral and religious sensibilities, and leaving a hole where their convictions used to be.


68 posted on 03/27/2012 11:33:06 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey)
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To: Joe 6-pack
That episode was titled, "Bread and Circuses." Coincidental to it's references to Imperial Rome, its original broadcast date was on the Ides of March, 1968.

I don't think I ever saw that episode.

I found it interesting that the country in "Hunger Games" is called Panem... as in "Panem et Circenses", or Bread and Circuses."

The Capitol of Panem (cleverly named "Capitol") has an Imperial Roman feel in its architecture and symbolism.

69 posted on 03/27/2012 11:39:34 AM PDT by Constitution Day
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To: Borges

I almost added that line myself! Absolutely true.


70 posted on 03/27/2012 11:40:15 AM PDT by Mach9
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To: JenB

Well it does create intimacy and immediacy. Whether it’s cheap or not depends on who’s doing it. The good news is that even the newest hottest trend never hits more than about 10% of the books, so if it’s annoying (like say sparkling vampires) it’s really easy to avoid. Heck I almost never wind up reading anything less than 5 years old anyway, too many books not enough time.


71 posted on 03/27/2012 12:33:21 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: stevie_d_64; af_vet_rr
Don’t know why it lasted even 74 years with this type of “game” going on before someone finally decided they had had enough...

I do. 74 years is exactly how long the Russian people put up with the Soviet Union, 1917-1991. The Soviet Union was also officially atheist. Obviously the aim of the books.
72 posted on 03/27/2012 12:47:33 PM PDT by UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide (REPEAL WASHINGTON! -- Islam Delenda Est! -- I Want Constantinople Back. -- Rumble thee forth.)
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To: rhema
I have little interest in this movie, it being yet another young adult fad like Harry Potter or Twilight, but I wonder why the writer of this article seems to think no mention of religion is an issue. Since when is a creative work required to address religion?

BTW...didn't we see a similar premise in The Running Man?

73 posted on 03/27/2012 12:49:20 PM PDT by 6ppc (It's torch and pitchfork time)
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To: GOPJ

>>>I finished The Hunger Games last night - 2 AM or so... great fun read. I’m also reading On Character - Essays by James Q Wilson, they dove tail nicely... Good and evil are defined in traditional terms in both books. It’s religion - just not obvious.<<<

I read “The Hunger Games” about two weeks ago on the advice of our high school librarian, who pointed out that it was popular with some of the readers at our school. I could see the appeal, but it came across to me as watered-down science fiction written in the style of a romance. I was consistently annoyed at the lack of foreshadow throughout. At one point, objects literally fall from the sky without any advance warning whatsoever. I’m also tired of the story with the strong heroine in the absence of strong male characters, which is the template in much of youth literature.

After reading “The Hunger Games,” I re-read “A Clockwork Orange.” Another dystopian world, this time painted in vivid colors. I was astonished at the depth from Burgess compared to the shallowness of “The Hunger Games.” Burgess puts more meat on a single page than “The Hunger Games” had in the entire book.

Just my opinion, like comparing McDonald’s to a fine restaurant. At least Burgess explicitly explores issues of faith and belief.


74 posted on 03/27/2012 1:12:20 PM PDT by redpoll
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To: redpoll
I’m also tired of the story with the strong heroine in the absence of strong male characters, which is the template in much of youth literature.

Well you can thank the market for that. If you want to make money with children's literature, you appeal to tween/teen girls.
75 posted on 03/27/2012 1:27:53 PM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
How much of the students' response is a trained reaction to the political correctness of college which was increasing during that time? I could see back in the 1970s being able to have a free form discussion over that story. By the 1990s the students would want to know what is the "proper" opinion is before expressing it because of fear of academic punishment for drawing outside the lines. Even in the 1980s it was known among students which professors liked the students to fight back and which ones would drop your grade for having the "wrong" opinion.
76 posted on 03/27/2012 1:34:32 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (You only have three billion heartbeats in a lifetime.How many does the government claim as its own?)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas

Scholars should be involved in choosing the great books just as doctors choose the best medicine. Parents can effectively guide education up until the teenage years but after that one needs an amount of expertise in a wide variety of subjects that most people can’t provide individually. A lot of very educated people had illiterate parents.


77 posted on 03/27/2012 1:34:49 PM PDT by Borges
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

North Korea was the best example of what I was thinking the Capitol in Hunger Games was based on. Complete control over people, no religion, breaking apart families, etc.


78 posted on 03/27/2012 1:37:02 PM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: StarCMC

I thought you might want to read this.


79 posted on 03/27/2012 2:50:47 PM PDT by Fawnn (Fawnn.com and AccessibilityJournal.com person - Faith makes things possible, not easy.)
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To: Borges

Your problem there is that picking “great” books is opinion based while picking the best medicine is adult based. And as we’ve already discussed to death the book “scholars” are picking as great tend to be books only they want to read and normal people only read when forced to in school. The “great” books wind up being one of the primary reasons people avoid school and hate reading, largely because scholars like them for tortuous and annoying language that normal people don’t want anything to do with. At some point you have to ask: is a book that 99% of the population will loathe and despise every single word of actually “great” or is it just that the literati are addicted to self abuse? You know my vote on that one.


80 posted on 03/27/2012 2:58:07 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide
Have you read the books or seen the movie?Because I saw nothing in the books or movie to indicate atheism In any way shape or form.If anything as I have previously posted I saw the hand of God everywhere. It was a movie to me that shows what could happen after Obama has his way and we fail in our initial attempt at revolution.
81 posted on 03/27/2012 3:21:56 PM PDT by Craftmore
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To: KarlInOhio

Thank you sir. I knew it was something like that. It was so long ago that I read it, and my short term memory is approaching 5 minutes, I couldn’t recall the exact quote or the author of it. It is true of course. We just saw a gathering of atheists in the news. They are the most religious people on earth. They have made their unbelief their god. Environmentalists make nature their god. Everybody pays allegiance to something.


82 posted on 03/27/2012 4:27:51 PM PDT by WVNan ("Socialism is the philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy." - Winston)
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To: GeronL

What you said.


83 posted on 03/27/2012 4:30:17 PM PDT by WVNan ("Socialism is the philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy." - Winston)
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To: WVNan

:)


84 posted on 03/27/2012 4:32:24 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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To: TR Jeffersonian

Ping


85 posted on 03/27/2012 4:47:05 PM PDT by kalee (The offenses we give, we write in the dust; Those we take, we engrave in marble. J Huett 1658)
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To: discostu

Give an example of a book that 99% will loathe. And influence on other writers is a large factor - that is fairly objective. Say Joyce, whose influence can still be seen in everything from literary fiction to pulp thrillers.


86 posted on 03/27/2012 5:27:23 PM PDT by Borges
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To: af_vet_rr
If the government wants total control, it either purges religion altogether, creates one that it controls to replace established religions, absorbs it into the government, or relegates it to a small corner

or subsidizes immorality

87 posted on 03/27/2012 6:46:29 PM PDT by alrea
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To: redpoll

Totally unfair.

“A Clockwork Orange’ is a classic - “The Hunger Games,” - a fun read... You’re right - it’s “like comparing McDonald’s to a fine restaurant”. I have no defense.


88 posted on 03/27/2012 6:55:21 PM PDT by GOPJ (Democrat-Media Complex - buried stories and distorted facts... freeper 'andrew' Breitbart)
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To: Borges

“Give an example of a book that 99% will loathe.”

Silmarillion.

Make 100 random people read it, maybe 1 will actually do so.
A great book, just far beyond most of the population.


89 posted on 03/27/2012 8:05:44 PM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: ctdonath2
Silmarillion.

Well it was the source of the name of one of my favorite bands....Marillion.

90 posted on 03/27/2012 8:07:12 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: rhema

Reminded me of some of the elements in RUNNING MAN.


91 posted on 03/27/2012 8:08:34 PM PDT by doug from upland (Just in case, it has been reserved: www.TheBitchIsBack2012.com)
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To: ctdonath2

Maybe but it’s not remotely a standard literary text.


92 posted on 03/27/2012 8:36:09 PM PDT by Borges
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To: Borges

I have yet to hear a good review of Moby Dick.


93 posted on 03/27/2012 9:51:24 PM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
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To: EyeGuy
I remember that episode from Star Trek and I specifically recall my delight that there was a reference to Jesus Christ, something about 'they said they worshipped the Son and here we thought they meant the Sun' (a play on words).
94 posted on 03/28/2012 1:08:01 AM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: Craftmore

Sure, I can see your point...

But the truth is that that worldly situation is something that might have been avoided had people had the courage to stand up to those that would bring such an un-Godly process to their civilization (for lack of a better term)...

Sure, there are people who do come out and become the fighters for good against evil...But, there was no resolution to the problem in this first film...

I understand some things develop further in the next book (movie), and the setup on this film is kinda obvious...

We saw a little of that after the folks in Rue’s district fought back after she was killed...That was actually something that surprised me, as I just can’t imagine some of us just standing by to watch kids be offered up as “tributes” for a slaughter, with only one winner..The last boy or girl standing...

Taking 74 years of this just doesn’t compute to have someone who grew up in that environment to be the only one to setup for the real fight that is sure to come up...

Someone who has read the entire series should chime in here and let us know if the system will be changed by this girl, and her partner...From what I heard the formula for the screenplay was pretty close to the novel...

This is just my opinion BTW...


95 posted on 03/28/2012 3:50:25 AM PDT by stevie_d_64 (I'm jus' sayin')
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To: UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide

Interesting comparison...

Even if the US goes totally socialist...It will not take 74 years to correct that issue...

And yes, before anyone says we are almost there, I get it...

We still have a few more battles to fight and win though...


96 posted on 03/28/2012 3:54:03 AM PDT by stevie_d_64 (I'm jus' sayin')
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To: ctdonath2

One of my favorite books in the world. I know a number of people who like it. You really have to love words though.


97 posted on 03/28/2012 5:38:29 AM PDT by Borges
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To: stevie_d_64
Taking 74 years of this

North Korea has over 60 years of behavior that is as bad as Hunger Games. You're talking about people who are either brainwashed or pretend to be brainwashing in order to stay alive.
98 posted on 03/28/2012 5:47:53 AM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: af_vet_rr

Yep, and there are mobs of brainwashed idiots in our country a well, who do not, or better could not, understand the effects of their ignorance...


99 posted on 03/28/2012 6:16:52 AM PDT by stevie_d_64 (I'm jus' sayin')
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To: Borges

Joyce is a fine example, lit nerds like you like his books, nobody else does. Influence on other writers (who lets face it have a high chance of being lit nerds) really is no reason to force high school kids to read it. If they start reading books by somebody that was influenced by Joyce they can look it up by CHOICE later in their life, when they’ll probably have a longer attention span and be more capable of wading through his pointlessly meandering sentences. That’s another part of the problem with how we shove “great” books down the throats of high school and college kids, we know scientifically that people in that age group have the attention span of gnats and yet we try to make them read books where the first sentence takes 27 words to say there’s a stream that goes past a house some fields and a castle. Really save the Joyce and stuff for grownups that have the attention span for it, leave it there to find if they want. Making them read it in school only teaches them that books suck.


100 posted on 03/28/2012 8:25:40 AM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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