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Walter Russell Mead: The Once and Future Liberalism
The American Interest. ^ | March/April 2012 issue | Walter Russell Mead

Posted on 03/31/2012 8:13:00 PM PDT by neverdem

We need to get beyond the dysfunctional and outdated ideas of 20th-century liberalism.

Writing about the onset of the Great Depression, John Kenneth Galbraith famously said that the end had come but was not yet in sight. The past was crumbling under their feet, but people could not imagine how the future would play out. Their social imagination had hit a wall.

The same thing is happening today: The core institutions, ideas and expectations that shaped American life for the sixty years after the New Deal don’t work anymore. The gaps between the social system we inhabit and the one we now need are becoming so wide that we can no longer paper over them. But even as the failures of the old system become more inescapable and more damaging, our national discourse remains stuck in a bygone age. The end is here, but we can’t quite take it in.

In the old system, most blue-collar and white-collar workers held stable, lifetime jobs with defined benefit pensions, and a career civil service administered a growing state as living standards for all social classes steadily rose. Gaps between the classes remained fairly consistent in an industrial economy characterized by strong unions in stable, government-brokered arrangements with large corporations—what Galbraith and others referred to as the Iron Triangle. High school graduates were pretty much guaranteed lifetime employment in a job that provided a comfortable lower middle-class lifestyle; college graduates could expect a better paid and equally secure future. An increasing “social dividend”, meanwhile, accrued in various forms: longer vacations, more and cheaper state-supported education, earlier retirement, shorter work weeks, more social and literal mobility, and more diverse forms of affordable entertainment. Call all this, taken together, the blue model.

In the heyday of the blue model, economists and social scientists assumed...

(Excerpt) Read more at the-american-interest.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: liberalism
The rats might excommunicate this apostate!
1 posted on 03/31/2012 8:13:08 PM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

Brilliant, thickly textured article.


2 posted on 03/31/2012 8:29:37 PM PDT by Publius
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To: Publius
Thank you. Even though he tends to go long, he's a rat worth the time if you have it. Unlike most of the left, he likes America and its history, and he can see whats not working. He rips Obamacare here:

The Health Care Disaster and the Miseries of Blue

It's shorter.

3 posted on 03/31/2012 8:48:27 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: neverdem

I’ve sent the link to the executive committee of our local Tea Party. This is something they should read.


4 posted on 03/31/2012 8:50:09 PM PDT by Publius
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To: neverdem
The gaps between the social system...

Red flag warning right there whenever someone starts talking about "social systems"...

...we inhabit and the one we now need...

Skating dangerously close to liberal idealism, talking about what we need...

...failures of the old system become more inescapable and more damaging...

Uh oh, failures of the old system are mostly just perceived failures by liberals because life doesn't meet their idealistic expectations.

...stuck in a bygone age...

Ah, the good old cliches, so comfortable.

...a career civil service administered a growing state...

And no-one saw a problem with this?

...an industrial economy characterized by strong unions in stable...

Again, no-one sees a problem with this? Serving yet another master?

...government-brokered arrangements with large corporations...

Yet another warning sign of a government becoming too powerful, too entrenched in our lives.

5 posted on 03/31/2012 8:53:16 PM PDT by ThunderSleeps (Stop obama now! Stop the hussein - insane agenda!)
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To: ThunderSleeps
The founders had everything right except excluding everyone but white men from voting. Everyone should be able to earn the privilege to vote, regardless or sex or race. But is should be a privilege none the less. When everyone is given the right, the lazy majority simply votes itself the national treasury.
6 posted on 03/31/2012 8:58:26 PM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Go Newt!)
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To: TexasFreeper2009
In Starship Troopers, Robert Heinlein restricted the right to vote to military veterans.
7 posted on 03/31/2012 9:01:20 PM PDT by Publius
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To: TexasFreeper2009

All too true...


8 posted on 03/31/2012 9:07:54 PM PDT by ThunderSleeps (Stop obama now! Stop the hussein - insane agenda!)
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To: neverdem

Not much different from rejection he’ll find from conservatives. He basically argues that both ideologies are out of date and neither is what American public wants.


9 posted on 03/31/2012 9:08:52 PM PDT by paudio (no tagline for now...)
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To: neverdem

It’s a long one (a whole beer’s worth), and there are some things in there that rub me the wrong way, BUT it makes a good point that most of today’s ‘progressives’ are really just reactionaries that are trying to hang on to some really broken ideas.

While I find many of the elements of the “New Deal”, unions etc to be philosophically bankrupt, I feel comfortable in capitulating that these things like Social Security used to work better than they do now; and that’s good common coalition ground. I also think it’s interesting to see that nuanced argument that the ‘blue model’ was an alternative to socialism rather than a route to it. There are certainly those that can argue well some of those earlier 20th century Dems were still bloody communists; but they did at least sometimes appear to peddle a limit, even if that’s not what they believed.


10 posted on 03/31/2012 9:13:30 PM PDT by jack_napier (Bob? Gun.)
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To: Publius
I kinda liked that aspect of the movie. If you're not willing to serve and sacrifice for your Country, why should you have a say in its path?

Some rights are inalienable, but some privileges should be earned.

11 posted on 03/31/2012 9:20:57 PM PDT by ThunderSleeps (Stop obama now! Stop the hussein - insane agenda!)
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To: neverdem

Yes, Mead’s health care article is really good and worth a look.

he points out that there are areas of health care like cosmetic surgery and veterinary medicine where costs are actually falling.

I don’t think it is a coincidence that these are areas where there is almost no insurance coverage.

Which suggests to me that concepts like medical savings accounts, where the cost of procedures matters to the patient, is the way to go.

There will be no effective health care reform unless it can focus consumers on the cost of medical procedures, rather than the cost of health care.


12 posted on 03/31/2012 9:28:40 PM PDT by Reverend Wright (you voted for Obama to prove you're not racist, now vote against him to prove you're not stupid...)
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To: neverdem
Wow! Great article. All Americans should read this. I picked out some paragraphs that stood out for me in the hope of getting other Freepers to read the whole thing:

But far too many Americans still have lives that are poor in meaning, in part because the blue social model separates production and consumption in ways that are ultimately dehumanizing and demeaning. A rich and rewarding human life neither comes from nor depends on consumption, even lots of consumption; it comes from producing goods and services of value through the integration of technique with a vision of social and personal meaning. Being fully human is about doing good work that means something. Is a blue society with our level of drug and alcohol abuse, and in which the average American watches 151 hours of television a month, really the happiest conceivable human living arrangement?

[...]

Third, government must reconcile itself to its declining ability to manage a post-blue economy with regulatory models and instincts rooted in the past. We need to be thinking about structural changes based on properly aligned incentive architecture, not regulatory systems based on command protocols.

[...]

Since that time, the American political terrain has shifted several times, but it never came to as firm an equipoise as during the quarter century following World War II. From 1968 through 2010 we seem to have been in another era, one in which blue liberal candidates lost more elections than they won. During these years, however, Republican gains have not been consolidated like Democratic gains were during and after the Depression. And the basic reason is that the blue social model of rising living standards based on stable manufacturing jobs for blue collar workers doesn’t work anymore. Automation and outsourcing mean that manufacturing sheds jobs in good times and bad. Rapid technological change and tough international competition force companies to innovate aggressively, and to stay lean. In such circumstances, no party can keep the American people happy for long.

[...]

Now it has happened again. The success of our institutions and ideas has so changed the world that they don’t work any more. We cannot turn back the clock, nor should we try. America’s job is to boldly go where none have gone before, not to consume our energies in vain attempts to recreate the glories of an unattainable past. We need to do for our times and circumstances what other Americans have done before us: Recast classic Anglo-American liberal thought, still the cultural and moral foundation of American life and the source of the commonsense reasoning that guides most Americans as they evaluate policy ideas and party programs, in ways that address the challenges before us.

For those blue Democrats clinging to liberalism 4.1, this is a time of doom and gloom. For those red Republicans longing for a return to liberalism 3.0, it is a time of angry nostalgia: Ron Paul making a stump speech. This should be a time of adventure, innovation and creativity in the building of liberalism 5.0. America is ready for an upgrade to a new and higher level; indeed, we are overdue for a project that can capture the best energies of our rising generations, those who will lead the United States and the world to new and richer ways of living that will make the “advanced” societies of the 20th century look primitive, backward and unfulfilled.

We’ve wasted too many years arguing over how to retrieve the irretrievable; can we please now get on with the actual business of this great, liberal, unapologetically forward-looking nation?

13 posted on 03/31/2012 10:46:15 PM PDT by No One Special
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To: TexasFreeper2009
Federal tax rates should be flat with a minimum income threshold. If you pay federal taxes you have a federal vote.

The same goes for states and municipalities. If you pay taxes in that jurisdiction, you have a vote in that jurisdiction.

Those who do not pay taxes do not get a vote. Rates at each level have to be flat to work. You can't have one group voting to raise taxes on another while exempting themselves.

14 posted on 03/31/2012 11:59:48 PM PDT by DB
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To: neverdem
The core institutions, ideas and expectations that shaped American life for the sixty years after the New Deal don’t work anymore.

If at least some perspicacious observers could see when the New Deal began that it would inevitably lead to our current predicament, can it properly be said ever to have worked?

15 posted on 04/01/2012 12:05:53 AM PDT by Erasmus (BHO: New supreme leader of the homey rollin' empire.)
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To: DB
With a real Flat Tax, everybody would pay the same amount.

Not percentage, AMOUNT.

um, ≤}B^)

16 posted on 04/01/2012 12:12:07 AM PDT by Erasmus (BHO: New supreme leader of the homey rollin' empire.)
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To: jack_napier
Ponzi schemes work for awhile.

People “make money”, everyone is happy.

Until it ends - an ending that was inevitable when it was started.

"Solutions" that kick the can down the road to a bitter end are not solutions at all and should never be started.

17 posted on 04/01/2012 12:14:24 AM PDT by DB
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To: Erasmus

That’s a poll tax.

Taking the same percentage of ones labor is moral as long as everyone has the same skin in the game.


18 posted on 04/01/2012 12:19:32 AM PDT by DB
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To: Erasmus

And sorry, I’m too tired to have much of sense of humor...


19 posted on 04/01/2012 12:22:22 AM PDT by DB
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To: neverdem
The core institutions, ideas and expectations that shaped American life for the sixty years after the New Deal don’t work anymore.

That's a point I've been trying to make for 20 years. While they love to label themselves "progressives," there is nothing progressive, innovative, or even enlightened about the liberal agenda. It is stale, outmoded, and has been obsolete for probably half a century. And it has always been at odds with the founding vision of this nation.

If you're looking for a philosophy that works, one that measures the future as a function of a successful past, conservatism is your only real choice. Liberalism is nothing more than yesterday's leftovers.

20 posted on 04/01/2012 6:31:29 AM PDT by IronJack (=)
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To: neverdem

I read Mead’s blog every day. Good stuff.


21 posted on 04/01/2012 9:40:06 AM PDT by Sic Parvis Magna
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To: neverdem

I’ve just copied and pasted that paragraph about the sheer amount of stuff people have and the impoverishment of their lives, and my intent is presenting it to my freshmen and sophomores tomorrow in their English class as their reflection prompt. Most of my students are Alaska Native students, and most of them have a seemingly endless supply of electronic toys and new snowmachines, and many of them come to class without any apparent habit of work. It’ll be another interesting day in my class.


22 posted on 04/01/2012 10:02:56 AM PDT by redpoll
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To: neverdem
The rats might excommunicate this apostate!

Not this guy. Heap big CFR elitist with huge RiNO horn .... in fact, his horn is so big, he gets to decide whether he wants to be a Democrat RiNO or a GOP RiNO. This is one of the guys who are supplying the deepthink to the Masters of the Universe. From his bio on Politico:

Walter Russell Mead is the Henry A. Kissinger senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and one of the country’s leading students of American foreign policy. His book, Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World (Alfred A. Knopf, 2004), was widely hailed by reviewers, historians, and diplomats as an important study that will change the way Americans and others think about American foreign policy. ....

He is an honors graduate of Groton and Yale, where he received prizes for history, debate, and the translation of New Testament Greek. Mr. Mead has traveled widely in the Middle East, Asia, Europe, Africa, and Latin America, and often speaks at conferences in the United States and abroad. He is a founding board member of the New America Foundation and the Brady-Johnson Distinguished Fellow in Grand Strategy at Yale. He is a native of South Carolina and lives in Jackson Heights, New York.....

...Mr. Mead writes regularly on international affairs for the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, International Herald Tribune, Washington Post, Financial Times, Foreign Affairs, New Yorker, Atlantic, Harper’s, and Esquire. He serves as a regular reviewer of books for Foreign Affairs and frequently appears on national and international radio and television programs. <snip>

Heap big deepthinker, author, lecturer, and -- the important part -- Way Better Than You.

Have talking head, will travel.

Everybody, drink rat poison and die. Walter Russell Mead hath spoken.

23 posted on 04/01/2012 11:35:39 AM PDT by lentulusgracchus
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To: redpoll
Most of my students are Alaska Native students

Do you mean Eskimos, or Alaskan Na-Dene Indians, distant cousins of the Apache and Navajo?

24 posted on 04/01/2012 11:40:34 AM PDT by lentulusgracchus
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To: No One Special
Frankly, I think he's trying to talk to Obammunists by sounding like one, as in this paragraph:
Fordism was once a term of abuse hurled at the factory system by Marxist critics who, rightly, deplored the alienation and anomie that mass production for mass consumption entailed. Has the Fordist factory system and the big box consumerism that goes with it now become our ideal, the highest form of social life our minds can conceive? Social critics also denounced our school system, justifiably, as a mediocre, conformity inducing, alienating, time wasting system that trained kids to sit still, follow directions and move with the herd. The blue model built big-box schools where the children of factory workers could get the standardized social and intellectual training necessary to enable most of them to graduate into the big-box Ford plant and shop in the big-box store. Maybe that was a huge social advance at one time, but is that something to aspire to or be proud of today? Don’t we want to teach our children to do something smarter than move in large groups by the clock and the bell, follow directions and always color between the lines?

So working on an assembly line or a "big-box store", and shopping in "big-box stores" is demeaning, and everything bad that Communists said about them?

One, does he really mean that? Two, is it true? Or is it more true, that big companies like that employed millions, negotiated with workers for a 40-hour workweek, and did not lay claim to 100% of a person's life the way the Communists and other Obama supporters do?

Conformism? That let women stay home and take care of the kids, instead of having to go out and find work and juggle latchkey kids and let them stay at home instead of being "socialized" by left-wing social workers and teachers? "Stultifying" what? Housework? Instead of daywork, and a demanding boss who wants 50 hours' work for 40 hours' pay? That's too tough on her?

25 posted on 04/01/2012 12:21:04 PM PDT by lentulusgracchus
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To: lentulusgracchus

What is more true about “Fordism” (which is an Antonio Gramsci term, check out Wikipedia for more) is that it increased the wealth of the world to a point where we stood looking out upon a “land of immeasurable plenty”. Man for the first time in history would be able to truly enjoy the fruits of his labor rather than just eking out a bare existence. Talk about your hope and change! With a little work, leisure time became available to many and poverty and starvation was becoming a thing of the past while the old empires of Europe whose wealth came from the exploitation of “captive” peoples were destined to die. And die they did in World War I, never to recover. And in their death throes they threw up the most evil ideologies ever conceived.

At least, that’s the way I see it. ;-)

The problem with people like Meade is that they think a future (for mankind) can be planned and, of course, they want to do the planning.

He may interpret history differently than I but he has a remarkably clear sight of some of the broad sweeps of that history and how it relates to the present day, IMHO.

Today, we are past “Fordism” as the computer revolution is overtaking the assembly line. What would Gramsci say or, for that matter, what does Meade say? Meade is silent because he doesn’t know, yet he still wants to plan. Telling.


26 posted on 04/01/2012 1:58:19 PM PDT by No One Special
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To: lentulusgracchus

>>>Do you mean Eskimos, or Alaskan Na-Dene Indians, distant cousins of the Apache and Navajo?<<<

Up here, the Indians in the Alaskan Interior are Athabascans. Most who attend our school are Koyukon or Gwitchin, although there are few Ahtna people here and there. The Eskimos are more properly known as Yup’ik, Chup’ik, or Inupiaq - all of which mean “the real people” or “the human beings” in their languages.

I’m Jewish, which means that I get to play with xenophobic Native snottiness when it comes up. For instance: I once had this kid tell me (in class), “Our culture is 10,000 years old.” I smiled and responded, “It’s nice to see that someone else has been around as long as the Jews.” This same kid then said a few hours later, “White people push us around,” to which I respond, “Yeah, the same thing happened to us.”

For my son, who is half Italian, we go far out of our way to make sure he know that he has a proud tradition, too - Romans, Italians, the good things done by the Catholics.

I also go way, way out of my way to uphold and praise American culture, especially the concepts of rule of law, limited government, and God-given rights. When we’ve read Solzhenitsyn in class (”One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich”), one of the local sidelights we explore is what would have happened to Alaskan Native people if this place was still Russian America under the control of the Communists. Suddenly those sad little moments in the BIA schools long ago seem like a minor problem compared to what could have happened.


27 posted on 04/01/2012 2:46:31 PM PDT by redpoll
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To: No One Special
Anyone still thinking Mead has something to say to conservatives and the Tea Party, can pretty well leave the room after he says (quoting the article again),

“Liberal” and “progressive” are two of the noblest and most important words in the English dictionary. They describe essential qualities of the American mind and essential values in American politics in a country born in reaction against oligarchy and concentrated autocracy. They sum up in a nutshell what this country is all about.

That should about do it.

I wasn't aware that "Fordism" is a coinage of Gramsci's, and it's interesting that Mead should track it into his new books and essays. It tells us either where he's coming from, or to whom he thinks he ought to direct his argument.

28 posted on 04/02/2012 4:54:33 AM PDT by lentulusgracchus
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To: redpoll
Up here, the Indians in the Alaskan Interior are Athabascans.

We're talking about the same thing, per the Wiki article on Athabaskan (Athabascan, Athapaskan). Their article says the Ahtna dialect is one of the most conservative and closest to "Proto-Athabaskan".

I noticed that the Kiowa Apache (term in use as recently as 20 years ago) are now called "Plains Apache".

“It’s nice to see that someone else has been around as long as the Jews.”

Hmm, I figure about 4200 since Avram left Ur of the Chaldees for Canaan .... figure a couple hundred more, since the Amoritic Habiru and their kinsmen the Shubiru of hated name, who were so abashed by the ill repute of their tribal name that they took instead the name of their tutelary god Ashur, came up out of the slowly desertifying Arabian Peninsula (once truly "Arabia Felix" and "the land of milk and honey"), to be reviled by the settled Akkadians of Bab-Ili ("Gate of God") as "the hateful Amurru".

So figure 4500 years, tops.

For my son, who is half Italian, we go far out of our way to make sure he know that he has a proud tradition, too.....

Goes back to about the middle of the 2nd millennium BC, when the Proto-Italic people lived in Pannonia, in the Plains of Hungary, speaking real Proto-Italic before it became differentiated, about the time they decided to cross the Alps and descend into Italy. (The name "Vitellius", btw, is Italic, = Lat. "Italus". And further back I think I saw an etymology having to do with young bulls.)

Yes, they "did good", too. <cue Miklos Rozsa>

29 posted on 04/02/2012 6:04:08 AM PDT by lentulusgracchus
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