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'Meat glue' is safe and natural, American Meat Institute says
Los Angeles Times / LATimes.com ^ | May 10, 2012, 2:05 p.m. | By Tiffany Hsu

Posted on 05/10/2012 6:22:54 PM PDT by thecodont

The American Meat Institute is striking back at reports that “meat glue,” a binding agent often used to patch together pieces of beef and other protein, is unsafe and unnatural.

In an occasionally touchy conference call Thursday, the trade group said that the USDA considers such substances to be safe and requires its presence to be noted on retail labels. The product, however, isn’t always disclosed when it’s served at restaurants and other food service outlets, experts said.

But using the binding substance to weave together high-quality cuts such as filet mignon with lower-priced meat such as chuck steak is “patently illegal,” said Mark D. Dopp, the institute’s general counsel.

Such "Frankenstein" meat would be easily discernible to diners and not condoned by the industry, he said.

Not long after the “pink slime” outcry and the reemergence of mad cow disease, concerns about meat glue have the industry back on defense.

California state Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance) recently called on the USDA to investigate such products, including options made by Fibrimex and Ajinomoto North America.

Ajinomoto uses transglutaminate, a “ubiquitous enzyme found in nature, basically every animal, in our tissues, in plants, trees and vegetables,” the company's Senior Vice President Brendan Naulty said on the conference call. Besides its meat applications, it is also used in products such as bread, yogurt and imitation crab.

Fibrimex uses fibrinogen and thrombin proteins, which company representative Christiaan Penning said was “designed by nature … but used in a more intelligent way.”

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: engineeredfood; meatglue; meatindustry
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To: redgolum
My only issue is if I pay for a steak, I want to know if it is really stew meat formed together.

True, and if I am paying $5.00 a pound for 93% lean ground beef, it better be ground beef and not a bunch of filler. Its fraud to pawn off ammonia and scraps and charge $5.00 a pound for it!

51 posted on 05/10/2012 8:25:41 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

LOL!


52 posted on 05/10/2012 8:31:48 PM PDT by 6SJ7 (Meh.)
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To: thecodont
It's amazing, call it pink slime and meat glue and all the people are frothing at the mouth.

Call it what it is, scrapple, sausage, etc. and gelatin and all the people go yum yum.

This is the liberal push to vilify meat just like they did to smokes.

53 posted on 05/10/2012 8:36:43 PM PDT by this_ol_patriot (Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner)
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To: unkus

I made chili today and two packages of ground beef in teh freezer. One was ground sirloin 10% fat ant the other was the 93% lean. The sirloin tastes better. I had made hamburgers with the 93% lean a few weeks back and they just didn’t taste right, the texture was off, too. Too fine, almost mealy.

Try ordering a steak at the restaurant and asking for ammonia to put on it. Wonder if they would look at you funny?

Not sure when they decided to make ammonia part of the food groups. We stopped eating at fast food burger joints a couple of years ago because the burgers tasted like crap. Now, we know why. Glad to see them stop.


54 posted on 05/10/2012 8:36:50 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: Netizen

Pink slime is only ground beef carried to an extreme. What you get isn’t “ammoniated” any more than the cookies that are commercially baked with ammonium bicarbonate leavening. (Whose practical use is pretty much restricted to tightly controlled commercial baking processes. Home ovens don’t always succeed in driving out the ammonia and the result comes out as nasty as you’d think.)


55 posted on 05/10/2012 8:37:13 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
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To: Netizen

As for me, I’d like to know where I could buy myself some packages of pink slime. Seems to me it would make a wicked meatball.


56 posted on 05/10/2012 8:39:09 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
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To: unkus

I can remember as a kid we went to some friends of our parents. And the guy was so proud to show my dad his new herd. He was taking a chance on this new breed called Black Angus. That was a long time ago.


57 posted on 05/10/2012 8:42:05 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

We don’t buy commercial cookies either. Most have trans fats up the wahoo in them. I make them from scratch. Better anyway. That way I can reduce the salt a bit if I want or lower the fat a little.


58 posted on 05/10/2012 8:46:30 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: varyouga
The overall risk, as estimated by the CDC, of the average American suffering ill effects from the food they eat has been estimated as being one in six, by the CDC. The number that was estimated in the 1950’s, sixty years ago, was the same - one in six.

In the past sixty years, we've regulated the heck out of just about every phase of the food stream - from farming to transport to storage and preparation. There are certification courses for food handlers, in person health inspection visits, etc, and yet, with all this regulation, the overall risk has remained unchanged. It's still a one in six chance.

Literally trillions of dollars down the drain for zero net change.

Isn't it a bit insane to continue to try the same methods, year after year after year and end up with the same results, yet somehow expect something different?

I understand what you're saying - if it wasn't for the USDA and their regulations, there would be more risk in the system. The flip side of that is that people would be less trusting of their food, and would treat it differently, and the overall risk wouldn't change, as it hasn't changed, even with all these strict regulations.

Instead, people trust expiration dates even if they see food stored or handled improperly, and not so shockingly, they get sick from it. They see servers and cooks with poor sanitary methods, but there's an inspection sign out front, so it'll be just fine - then they get sick. The regulation has served to only prevent people from exercising their own common sense, and has resulted in the same net effect.

59 posted on 05/10/2012 8:48:24 PM PDT by kingu (Everything starts with slashing the size and scope of the federal government.)
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To: redgolum
I think you are a bit ignorant of how people act.

Actually, I'm taking into account how people act. With strict regulation comes strict methods of how to game the system, and that's exactly what people do.

To take a more practical example, look at mutual funds today. People will invest in them, not knowing at all what they are investing in, or how it is managed, simply because they trust regulators to keep everything on the up and up. And year after year, more and more people are having every penny of their savings stolen because they are trusting the regulations, and ignoring any form of common sense.

If you put a lottery machine right next to a slot machine, and ask people which has a more likely chance of giving a payoff, people will point to the state lottery time and time again - it's more regulated, it's run by the state, it of course must have better odds. If you ask them which has a higher 'rake' or taking for the house - the overhead of the game, they'll again say that the lottery is better. It's state run, they wouldn't rip us off.

Tons of accidents happen each year because people trust a stop sign to actually stop traffic, or walk out into the street because a walk sign says it's ok to go, without even looking to see that oncoming car which was running the yellow.

When you assure people that someone else is looking after their risk, any common sense goes out the window. And that's why, after sixty years of ever increasing regulation and strict guidelines, the end results of food borne illness is still the same - a one in six chance of it happening to any American each and every year.

60 posted on 05/10/2012 8:59:02 PM PDT by kingu (Everything starts with slashing the size and scope of the federal government.)
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To: Jack Hydrazine

I did, in high school. I thought those days were over. Maybe not.


61 posted on 05/10/2012 9:00:30 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (I like Obamacare because Granny signed the will and I need the cash)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

I don’t like trying to chew on the pieces of artery that I find in it. Kind of chewy and tough. I find more of that type of stuff in the 93% lean. Weird.


62 posted on 05/10/2012 9:06:51 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: Netizen

Neat. What state?


63 posted on 05/10/2012 9:09:15 PM PDT by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: Netizen

I was driving through western Oklahoma and saw a lot of Black Angus. Years ago they raised mostly white faced Hereford.
Believe my father said Angus were hardier and had fewer health problems. I had one of the best sirloin steaks I’ve ever had in Woodward, Oklahoma.


64 posted on 05/10/2012 9:10:12 PM PDT by tumblindice (Our new, happy lives.)
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To: Persevero

For me, a complete and efficient use of the animal would include moving some of it to pet food. I don’t want to consume lungs, eyes, brains, hearts etc, liver and kidneys, maybe.

I don’t know what goes into pink slime or meat glue but I know I can enjoy a piece of meat without them. That’s the way I want it. I’ll pay for it that way.


65 posted on 05/10/2012 9:13:45 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (I like Obamacare because Granny signed the will and I need the cash)
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To: thecodont

Do not substitute elmer’s glue if yur out of transglutaminase enzymes at home.


66 posted on 05/10/2012 9:17:07 PM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: unkus

Michigan


67 posted on 05/10/2012 9:28:44 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: unkus

I should clarify that he probably meant new to him. I remember him saying that he had been reading up on them for a couple of years and decided to take a chance.


68 posted on 05/10/2012 9:31:55 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: muir_redwoods; Persevero
For me, a complete and efficient use of the animal would include moving some of it to pet food. I don’t want to consume lungs, eyes, brains, hearts etc, liver and kidneys, maybe.

I don’t know what goes into pink slime or meat glue but I know I can enjoy a piece of meat without them. That’s the way I want it. I’ll pay for it that way.

Pick up a cookbook from 50+ years ago and you'll find (under the "Meats" section) information on how to deal with "variety meats" (also known as "offal" -- the lungs, tripe, kidneys, etc.). I'm thinking specifically of Rombauer's The Joy of Cooking in its 1975 and 1943 editions.

Eating seemed to be done more in moderation then. Thumb through these cookbooks and find recipes for croquettes, gelatin salads, light sandwiches, etc. Today food seems to be presented in extreme religious terms, either monastic or decadent, nothing in between.

But those modest meals of the past DID deal with the less mentionable parts of the beast and thought nothing of it. How is scrapple made? Aren't sausage casings made from intestines? Isn't gelatin made from boiled bones?

I can still remember when the grocery store would sell soup bones cheap, and unusable bones and other meat refuse were made available for pets. Now people are trying to get their pets on vegetarian diets!

So now, ironically, along with "whole foods" and organic produce, we also have genetically modified plants and engineered foodstuffs that are extruded and sprayed with flavor and baked to a crisp texture. Yummy.

I think the nation's mental attitude towards food is swinging between wild extremes. People are either dieting or are stuffing their faces until they become morbidly obese. The local bus line has installed extra-wide seats on its coaches to accommodate ample bottoms.

69 posted on 05/10/2012 9:32:20 PM PDT by thecodont
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To: tumblindice

Sounds familiar. I don’t know how many he had but they were beautiful looking.


70 posted on 05/10/2012 9:33:58 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: muir_redwoods

I agree with you on all counts. I’d rather pay the higher price for the higher quality.


71 posted on 05/10/2012 9:35:24 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: Netizen

My mother’s father raised them, along with some cotton and wheat. I’m old enough to remember that `polled’ (no horns) Herefords were a big thing. I used to watch the hands de-horn and castrate the cattle. Man, that was a mess.
One day I took a shortcut through a field owned by a big Hereford bull and he made it clear I was trespassing. It turned quickly into a “Run Forrest Run!” deal & I cleared the barb fence without about a foot to spare.
But I believe the Herefords had problems with pink-eye and their eyes generally, and sunburn. Someone else probably could explain better why they switched to Angus.
I can remember driving along those red dirt roads, just a kid, and seeing a half-dozen or more coyotes hung up on wire. I suppose that was to warn the others off. Today they’d probably gig ranchers for doing that.
And we wore onions on our belts ... I’m starting to sound like Old Man Simpson, so off to bed.


72 posted on 05/10/2012 9:45:44 PM PDT by tumblindice (Our new, happy lives.)
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To: Netizen

He probably ended up doing well. In what state was that?


73 posted on 05/10/2012 9:45:48 PM PDT by unkus (Silence Is Consent)
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To: muir_redwoods

” I know I can enjoy a piece of meat without them. That’s the way I want it. I’ll pay for it that way.”

That’s all good. As long as products are honestly labelled, you can pay more for the more premium cuts and etc.

But I don’t think the meat companies are “bad” for using all of the cow.


74 posted on 05/10/2012 10:02:46 PM PDT by Persevero (Homeschooling for Excellence since 1992)
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To: unkus

Michigan


75 posted on 05/10/2012 10:08:32 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: tumblindice

What was the onion for?


76 posted on 05/10/2012 10:09:21 PM PDT by Netizen (Path to citizenship = Scamnesty. If you give it away, more will come.)
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To: kingu
If you think that a one in six chance of food borne illness is what it was before the USDA, you're dreaming.

I have been to countries with an unregulated food supply. You will get sick. When we fly people to some of these places, the company I work for spends a lot of money to either bring food with them or find a supplier who will guarantee that the food is safe. Even then, the latter is a big risk and there was a coworker who spent time a hospital.

Simply put, if there is no consequences, no one will do it. We spend hundreds of thousands of dollars testing our products. The company wouldn't spend a dime if we didn't have to.

77 posted on 05/11/2012 4:03:49 AM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: muir_redwoods

The kosher meat industry has such high standards and polices itself so well the USDA doesn’t even bother them.


78 posted on 05/11/2012 5:31:56 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: thecodont

The historical origin of Soylent wafers?


79 posted on 05/11/2012 5:35:31 AM PDT by Eye of Unk (Liberals need not reply.)
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To: thecodont

80 posted on 05/11/2012 5:42:46 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Netizen

Out of three handy cookie packages I picked up and looked at, one has zero trans fat, one does not say (probably also has none, because of modern listing requirements), and one (dollar store cheap) shows trans fat at a tiny fraction of the total. A far cry from the Crisco cookies of old.


81 posted on 05/11/2012 7:56:31 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
I think there is a confusion here between “minimally processed” and “organic.”

Nothing but free-range meat glue for me. ;-)

82 posted on 05/12/2012 6:36:11 AM PDT by Constitutionalist Conservative (I'm a constitutionalist, not a libertarian. Huge difference.)
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To: unkus
Deep in the article was a line taken from an email sent by a disgruntled USDA fellow in 2002, and obtained through a simple FOIA request, that referred to the stuff as “pink slime.”

So, the USDA has its own James Hansen, it appears.

83 posted on 05/12/2012 6:43:05 AM PDT by Constitutionalist Conservative (I'm a constitutionalist, not a libertarian. Huge difference.)
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To: the invisib1e hand
I used to get in so much trouble for eating this stuff. Now its all the rage.


84 posted on 05/12/2012 7:11:14 AM PDT by Delta 21 (Oh Crap !! Did I say that out loud ??!??)
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To: Constitutionalist Conservative

Ultimately it’s no worse than a more glamorously molded form of Spam. Any chef who can produce a convincing faux steak has an art form in its own right.


85 posted on 05/12/2012 8:24:04 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
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