Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Private navy planned to counter pirate raids
The National ^ | May 13, 2012 | David Black

Posted on 05/16/2012 12:23:43 PM PDT by bkopto

A private navy costing US$70 million (Dh257m) is being set up to escort merchant ships through the pirate-infested Gulf of Aden.

It will comprise a fleet of 18 ships, based in Djibouti, and will offer to convoy merchant vessels along the Internationally Recognised Transit Corridor (IRTC).

This is the world's most dangerous shipping lane, between the Red Sea and the Arabian Sea. The fleet will be operated by the Convoy Escort Programme (CEP), a British company launched by the international shipping insurers Jardine Lloyd Thompson (JLT) and the Lloyds of London underwriters Ascot.

Full funding will be in place by the end of next month, and the CEP hopes the fleet will be operational by December.

"The shipping industry needs to stand up and be counted," said Angus Campbell, the CEP's chief executive and a former director of Overseas Shipholding Group, the world's second-biggest listed oil tanker company. "The time is now, not in four or five years' time."

Piracy in the region is costing the global economy an estimated US$7 billion a year. For the ship owners alone, every vessel sailing through the waters off Somalia is charged additional insurance premiums of between $50,000 and $80,000.

Ships opting to carry their own armed guards can be charged an additional $18,000 and $60,000 per voyage by security companies.

Although the European Union is spending more than €8m (Dh37.94m) a year to maintain a naval force in the waters - EU NavFor - its warships still cannot provide close support to all merchant vessels.

The CEP, however, offers substantial savings to owners as well as protection from pirate attack. The CEP will buy insurance and use that to cover the ships in its convoys, so owners will no longer need to pay premiums, or hire security.

Instead, they will just pay a flat $30,000 to $40,000 per ship in the convoy.

The CEP is planning to buy seven 150-foot fast patrol boats, understood to be ex-Swedish Navy, and has already earmarked 11 former offshore supply vessels for purchase and conversion.

The ships will be equipped with fast semi-inflatables, called ribs, an array of non-lethal counter-measures, and 0.50 calibre heavy machine guns. They will be operated by a crew of five and carry eight armed security personnel each.

The programme will result in convoys of up to four merchant ships closely escorted by one CEP craft along the IRTC, with additional CEP ships in support, covering east and west-bound traffic.

Once in operation, the force will capable of escorting up to 470 ships a month through the Gulf of Aden, equivalent to about 25 per cent of current traffic.

"Our crews will undergo intensive training in how to implement a graduated response. We will be compliant with maritime law and will observe the International Maritime Organisation conventions, such as the Safety of Life at Sea treaty," said Mr Campbell. "We have had detailed discussions with the Royal Navy, who were a little concerned at first, but are now supportive, as are the British government."

Sean Woollerson, a partner in the marine, oil and gas division of JLT, said the description "private navy" did not apply to the CEP fleet.

The aim is to stop the pirates before they reach the merchant ship, and the emphasis is on non-lethal measures. Use of offensive weapons will be a last resort. "This is not a navy," said Mr Woollerson. "What we're trying to be is a deterrent force. Prevention is within our reach."

The plan has been put together during the past three and a half years and now involves 21 companies, including law firms, auditors and risk managers, as well as JLT and Ascot.

The CEP has agreed with the Cyprus Maritime Administration for its vessels to sail under the island's flag.

"Anything that can prevent piracy in this area is to be supported," Pottengal Mukundan, the chief executive of the Commercial Crime Services arm of the International Maritime Bureau, told the British newspaper TheMail on Sunday.

JLT is a leading British insurance business and was first established as a division of Jardine, Matheson and Company, which was founded in Canton [now known as Guangdong], China, in 1832.

Although floated off, Jardine still owns 40 per cent of JLT, which specialises in risk insurance, such as shipping, kidnap and ransom. JLT insures 14 per cent of the global shipping fleet and is a traded on the FTSE 250 Index.

"While this peril has always existed on the high seas, the scale and intensity of piracy in the Gulf of Aden has focused the attention of the shipping and insurance industries on this exposure," said the company's website regarding its involvement in the programme.


TOPICS: Extended News
KEYWORDS:
FTA:

The aim is to stop the pirates before they reach the merchant ship, and the emphasis is on non-lethal measures. Use of offensive weapons will be a last resort.

1 posted on 05/16/2012 12:23:43 PM PDT by bkopto
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: bkopto

The cannons don’t thunder there’s nothing to plunder….


2 posted on 05/16/2012 12:28:06 PM PDT by Moleman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto
The CEP will buy insurance and use that to cover the ships in its convoys, so owners will no longer need to pay premiums, or hire security.

Can you imagine the first ship owner that says "no thanks, I don't need insurance around Somalia, I'll depend on the Somalia Navy instead".

No? Me neither.

3 posted on 05/16/2012 12:30:48 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

Better treat ‘em right ... otherwise, you’re just training future pirates. If I’m not mistaken, the original Pirates of the Spanish Main were disgruntled former privateers.

SnakeDoc


4 posted on 05/16/2012 12:32:39 PM PDT by SnakeDoctor ("I've shot people I like more for less." -- Raylan Givens, Justified)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

I’d rather have the Russian Navy patrolling the waters. After all, sharks gotta eat, too.


5 posted on 05/16/2012 12:34:08 PM PDT by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

will eye patches be mandatory this time around?


6 posted on 05/16/2012 12:36:23 PM PDT by Jeff Vader
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

Wow! Will they be taking passengers willing to work for free?


7 posted on 05/16/2012 12:43:40 PM PDT by oneolcop (Lead, Follow or Get the Hell Out of the Way!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

the problem with a private navy is . . . what will it shoot at after the pirates are gone?


8 posted on 05/16/2012 12:48:46 PM PDT by JohnBrowdie (http://forum.stink-eye.net)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

I wonder how long before the first Letters of Marquee (or whatever the modern equivalent is) are issued.


9 posted on 05/16/2012 12:49:23 PM PDT by Turbo Pig (...to close with and destroy the enemy...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

The Merchant Marine version of Blackwater.


10 posted on 05/16/2012 12:50:44 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Do I really need a sarcasm tag? Seriously? You're that dense?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

This could become a sport like Marlin fishing or Tuna fishing. There is nothing like the thrill of the hunt. Instead of rods and reels the sportsmen can use 50 caliber machine guns to get their prizes.


11 posted on 05/16/2012 12:51:46 PM PDT by forgotten man (forgotten man)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Moleman

“The cannons don’t thunder there’s nothing to plunder….”

...I’m an over-forty victim of fate. arriving too late. arriving too late...


12 posted on 05/16/2012 12:52:09 PM PDT by Londo Molari
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

Letters of marque and reprisal anybody?

Betcha this private navy would catch more pirates than the politically correctness bound US navy would.


13 posted on 05/16/2012 12:52:12 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto
The various nations should equip "Merchant Raiders" to deal with the problem. Such ships were used successfully in WWI. "Q-ships" were used successfully in WWII against German U-Boats. The Q-Ship was an armed war ship disguised as a merchant. The Merchant Raiders were merchant ships that had been heavily armed with 6 inch guns. As they approached the victim the side would drop and the gun was revealed.

Imagine the final look and last words of a Somali pirate as the side dropped and the concealed gun fired!

14 posted on 05/16/2012 12:53:15 PM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thackney

It ain’t an either-or, but contracting this navy might give a merchant a discount on his piracy insurance.


15 posted on 05/16/2012 12:53:33 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: HiTech RedNeck

“Betcha this private navy would catch more pirates than the politically correctness bound US navy would.”

Amen to that!


16 posted on 05/16/2012 12:53:42 PM PDT by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: oneolcop

Not sure that’s such a good idea.

These “security forces” are advertizing that “Use of offensive weapons will be a last resort” and their maximum firepower will be a .50 cal.

Any astute Somali pirate worth his miraa will immediately buy a 23mm or larger and pop the security escorts before they are within .50 cal range.

You might as well be wearing a blue helmet.


17 posted on 05/16/2012 12:55:49 PM PDT by BwanaNdege (Man has often lost his way, but modern man has lost his address - Gilbert K. Chesterton)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: AEMILIUS PAULUS

I forgot to refer to the “Seeadler” a WWI German Navy commerce raider.


18 posted on 05/16/2012 12:57:10 PM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: bkopto
"The ships will be equipped with fast semi-inflatables, called ribs, an array of non-lethal counter-measures, and 0.50 calibre heavy machine guns."

For the love of God, why?????????

Idiots. If you want more lives lost or more kidnap victims....you want millions and millions more in losses from these floating filth, by ALL means just swat their little hinies.

Blow them out of the water into red vapor.

19 posted on 05/16/2012 12:59:43 PM PDT by RightOnline (I am Andrew Breitbart!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto
...and the emphasis is on non-lethal measures. Use of offensive weapons will be a last resort

IMO a mistake. Hit them hard the first time.

OTOH it will promote escort job security as the pirates aren't eliminated. They will try again, requiring more escorts.

20 posted on 05/16/2012 1:00:45 PM PDT by Vinnie (A)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

I am waitng for a pirate safari to be put together.


21 posted on 05/16/2012 1:02:53 PM PDT by rawhide
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Vinnie

“OTOH it will promote escort job security as the pirates aren’t eliminated. They will try again, requiring more escorts. “

It’s a business like any other. If you actually solved the problem, you’d be out of business. LOL


22 posted on 05/16/2012 1:04:25 PM PDT by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: bkopto
I am curious what happens to the pirate captives? Will they be sent to Western countries to be assimilated into their societies?
23 posted on 05/16/2012 1:04:30 PM PDT by rawhide
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum

“The Merchant Marine version of Blackwater.”

I half expected to see Eric Princes name in the article somewhere :)


24 posted on 05/16/2012 1:06:52 PM PDT by An American! (Proud To Be An American!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

The USS Constitution was built mainly to deal with the Barbary Pirates, also Religion of peace pirates.


25 posted on 05/16/2012 1:10:04 PM PDT by mountainlion (I am voting for Sarah after getting screwed again by the DC Thugs.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Travis McGee; Squantos; Eaker

That’s damn near 2 million a month in gross revenue. Not a bad business plan.


26 posted on 05/16/2012 1:11:38 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: An American!
I half expected to see Eric Princes name in the article somewhere :)

And then we have this from Wikipedia (I know, Wikipedia sucks)

After Blackwater

In January 2011, the Associated Press reported that Prince had taken on a new role training a force of 2000 Somalis for anti-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden. The program is reportedly funded by several Arab countries, including the United Arab Emirates and backed by the United States. Prince's spokesman, Mark Corallo, said that Prince has "no financial role" in the project and declined to answer any questions about Prince's involvement. The Somali force will also reportedly pursue an Islamist supporting warlord.

The Associated Press quotes John Burnett of Maritime Underwater Security Consultants as saying "There are 34 nations with naval assets trying to stop piracy and it can only be stopped on land. With Prince's background and rather illustrious reputation, I think it's quite possible that it might work."[36]

27 posted on 05/16/2012 1:13:30 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Do I really need a sarcasm tag? Seriously? You're that dense?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator
“I’d rather have the Russian Navy patrolling the waters. After all, sharks gotta eat, too.”
___

Exactly right. Or a portable R2D2 mounted above the bridge, take it off of a ship going one direction and put it on one going the other direction. Package deal complete with operators, make approaching a commercial vessel so dangerous that no one would attempt it, and buy enough of them to cover all the ships in transit.

28 posted on 05/16/2012 1:15:15 PM PDT by mongo141 (Revolution ver 2.0, just a matter of when, not a matter of if!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

Did someone say "escort"?

29 posted on 05/16/2012 1:20:27 PM PDT by colorado tanker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: HiTech RedNeck
It ain’t an either-or,

The article stated the economics working as a replacement cost.

The CEP will buy insurance and use that to cover the ships in its convoys, so owners will no longer need to pay premiums, or hire security.

Instead, they will just pay a flat $30,000 to $40,000 per ship in the convoy.

30 posted on 05/16/2012 1:21:02 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: rawhide

” I am curious what happens to the pirate captives? Will they be sent to Western countries to be assimilated into their societies? “

The Somalis we brought here have started crime waves everywhere we dropped them.


31 posted on 05/16/2012 1:21:31 PM PDT by stephenjohnbanker (God, family, country, mom, apple pie, the girl next door and a Ford F250 to pull my boat.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

Sounds like a long term revenue generation protection racket, rather than a pirate elimination service, to me. It keeps pirates at a distance, alive armed and ready, as long as you pay.


32 posted on 05/16/2012 1:31:50 PM PDT by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it and the law is what WE say it is.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thackney; HiTech RedNeck
The article could have been more clearly written, however I believe what they meant was that the ship owners wouldn't have to pay the "additional premiums" for piracy coverage. That meaning is plain enough (to me), in the context of the whole article.
33 posted on 05/16/2012 1:44:38 PM PDT by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

wners wouldn’t have to pay the “additional premiums” for piracy coverage

I read it the same. Sorry I wasn’t clear.


34 posted on 05/16/2012 1:49:12 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

I’d shiver her timbers.


35 posted on 05/16/2012 1:50:24 PM PDT by thefactor (yes, as a matter of fact, i DID only read the excerpt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA; thackney

Especially consider that it’s being RUN in part by the noted ship and specialty insurance firm Lloyds of London. (The one that rings the Lutine Bell when the loss of a ship is reported.) Sounds a lot like Lloyds will offer the option of piracy coverage WITH a contract to this navy, for cheaper than piracy coverage without it.


36 posted on 05/16/2012 2:03:54 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Salamander

yo ho ho and a yeehaw


37 posted on 05/16/2012 2:04:36 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: HiTech RedNeck

I guess we will have to disagree.

I read “The CEP will buy insurance and use that to cover the ships in its convoys, so owners will no longer need to pay premiums”.

to mean no longer paying piracy premiums, not a discounted piracy premium. It is included in their fee.

Cheers (and a bottle of rum, yo ho...)


38 posted on 05/16/2012 2:08:27 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker

AAARRRGGG,,, She’s a fine looking wench . . .


39 posted on 05/16/2012 2:17:44 PM PDT by ▀udda▀udd
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: thackney

Well the idea that CEP is buying insurance for its navylet sounds even weirder. And it wouldn’t have anything to do with insurance for the shippers contracting their help... or would it? Anyhow, if backed by Lloyds isn’t that redundant? Perhaps some words got misplaced here.

Sounds like a package deal. You hire the Mini Navy and you also get coverage for cases where even it failed to halt pirates. But we’ll have to wait to see the details spelled out in a formal offer. Surely it will show up on the Lloyds website...?


40 posted on 05/16/2012 3:42:50 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: bkopto

Huh? Did they stop the pirate cruises?

http://maggiesfarm.anotherdotcom.com/archives/11581-Luxury-Pirate-Hunting-Cruise.html


41 posted on 05/16/2012 4:04:32 PM PDT by Rebelbase
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson