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Is Sicily the California of Italy, or Is California the Sicily of the United States? ^ | July 25, 2012 | Daniel J. Mitchell

Posted on 07/25/2012 11:02:27 AM PDT by Kaslin

Considering the spectacular incompetence of the Italian government, I’m not surprised that the Italian people take extraordinary steps to protect their income from the tax police.

But I have a hard time cheering their actions, since they routinely vote for corrupt politicians and also seek to mooch off the government that they don’t want to pay for.

Sicily is a useful example. Here are key passages from a New York Times report.

…one region in particular has been in the spotlight: Sicily, which some fear has become “the Greece of Italy” and is at risk of defaulting on its high public debts. …an official in the Sicily branch of Italy’s leading industrialists association called for the island to be put into receivership by the central government to clean up its finances. …Sicily highlights the challenges that Mr. Monti is facing in trying to use pressure from European leaders and international markets to push Italy’s politicians to cut costs. Those expenses have ballooned after decades of a patronage system in which the state has been the primary means of employment in Sicily.

We know there’s a mess. And, to give credit where it’s due, the New York Times does discuss the bloated bureaucracy in Sicily.

…critics say Italy — and Sicily in particular — has been driven into dire financial straits not by austerity but by the rampant public spending of the past, the product of an entrenched jobs-for-votes system that helped keep Italian governments in power and Sicilians employed. Today, Sicily’s regional government has 1,800 employees — more than the British Cabinet Office — and the island employs 26,000 auxiliary forest rangers; in the vast forest lands of British Columbia, there are fewer than 1,500. Out of a population of five million people in Sicily, the state directly or indirectly employs more than 100,000 of them and pays pensions to many more. It changed its pension system eight years after the rest of Italy. (One retired politician recently won a case to keep an annual pension of 480,000 euros, about $584,000.)

Not surprisingly, the political class doesn’t want to fire any of the deadwood, which means an enormous burden on taxpayers and lots of suffering for young people.

“Of course that’s too many,” Mr. Lombardo said of the forest rangers. But he said it was difficult to cut back because state workers have job protection. “We have to wait for them to retire.” That system has come at a cost. Last month, Italy’s audit court issued a scathing report saying that Sicily had 7 billion euros, about $8.5 billion, of liabilities at the end of 2011 and showed “signs of unstoppable decline.” Sicily’s unemployment rate is 19.5 percent, twice the national average, and 38.8 percent of young people do not have jobs.

Lombardo must have spent time in Chicago

By the way, the head of the Sicilian government is a very accomplished politician. It’s not uncommon for lawmakers to go to prison after a stint in government, but it takes a special politician to then go back into “public service.”

Mr. Lombardo, who belongs to the Movement for Autonomy — which believes that Sicily should secede from the Italian state, as unlikely as that is to happen — said he would step down as agreed. (He is under investigation for Mafia ties. He denies the accusations and has not been formally charged. He was jailed on corruption charges in the early 1990s, though he was later acquitted.)

At least some residents have figured out how the political system works.

Many Sicilians, for their part, take a world-weary view of the political class. “If I steal a little, I go to jail; if I steal a lot, I advance my career,” Gioacchino De Giorgi, 34, said as he worked in a tobacco shop in downtown Palermo.

Needless to say, this story is yet another example of why bailouts are a bad idea. As I’ve explained before, governments will only make the right reforms as a final option. Bailouts, by contrast, simply give politicians more time to delay, while also making the debt bubble even bigger as reforms are postponed.

This is true, regardless of whether bailouts come from national governments, the European Commission, or international bureaucracies such as the International Monetary Fund.

And it’s true whether we’re talking about an Italian province, or an American state that also is governed by short-sighted and corrupt politicians. Like California.

TOPICS: Business/Economy; Editorial; Foreign Affairs

1 posted on 07/25/2012 11:02:31 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

I have been to Sicily and California twice. I would take Sicily any day.

2 posted on 07/25/2012 12:41:26 PM PDT by Captain Jack Aubrey (There's not a moment to lose.)
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To: Captain Jack Aubrey

I have been to Sicily and California twice. I would take Sicily any day.

Me too!!!!! I love Sicily. Sad to see them going through financial difficulties but the people and food are extraordinary. I would not say a negative word about Sicily ever. They will survive this. I mean this poor country has been through hell and back many times over. They have been taken over so many times that they are probably wondering who is their government I imagine some FREEPERS will be saying they love the financial distruction of this country but I don’t love it one bit and wish them the best!!!!!

3 posted on 07/25/2012 1:06:06 PM PDT by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator


4 posted on 07/25/2012 2:13:23 PM PDT by Captain Jack Aubrey (There's not a moment to lose.)
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To: Kaslin

Yeah, I'll take Sicily.

5 posted on 07/25/2012 2:15:13 PM PDT by dfwgator (FUJR (not you, Jim))
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To: Kaslin

Italy is the California of the world, and California is the Italy of the United States.

6 posted on 07/25/2012 4:16:41 PM PDT by familyop ("Wanna cigarette? You're never too young to start." --Deacon, "Waterworld")
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