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FReeper Canteen - Tunes For Our Troops - 16 Feb 2013
Our Troops Rock!!!!!!!!!!! | The Canteen DJ's

Posted on 02/15/2013 6:11:05 PM PST by AZamericonnie

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To: left that other site

While almost everybody had a piano in the parlor, almost every family also had someone who could play fiddle. Most churches had someone who could play the pump organ. Most towns had amateur brass bands. Many towns had fiddlers, banjo pickers and others who could play dances. This was a very musical country.


41 posted on 02/15/2013 7:18:53 PM PST by Publius
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To: AZamericonnie

Hi Everybody!

((((HUGS))))


42 posted on 02/15/2013 7:20:18 PM PST by left that other site (Worry is the darkroom that developes negatives.)
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To: AZamericonnie; ConorMacNessa; Drumbo; Kathy in Alaska; MS.BEHAVIN; LUV W; left that other site
In 1850, Stephen Foster turned 24, and he began turning out one song after another. This one is humorous.

Foster: “Oh! Lemuel!”

This is one of his most famous tunes. It turned up in countless TV westerns in the Fifties.

”Nelly Bly”

You can’t help but dance to this one.

”Dolly Day”

This is synonymous with Foster and is a critical part of American song.

”De Camptown Races”

Catchy!

”Angelina Baker”

A good example of the slow, sentimental songs of the era. That’s Jay Ungar of “Ashokan Farewell” on fiddle.

”Ah! May the Red Rose Live Always!”

Dance away!

”Way Down in Ca-i-ro”

Simply beautiful!

”The Voice of Bygone Days”

With successful songs like this under his belt, Foster felt prosperous enough to marry Jane MacDowell in 1850. Their daughter was born a year later.

43 posted on 02/15/2013 7:23:43 PM PST by Publius
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To: 2LT Radix jr; acad1228; AirForceMom; Colonel_Flagg; AliVeritas; aomagrat; ariamne; armyavonlady; ...




Music for our Troops, Veterans,
and their families!!

Alan Parsons Project~Time

If you would like to support the artists
you hear in the Canteen,
please go to the top of the thread.

Please ping any DJ to song requests
made on the thread. Thank you!

44 posted on 02/15/2013 7:31:01 PM PST by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos!)
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To: Publius

Indeed!

The syncopation and melodies that Foster employed showed admiration and affection for emerging Black musical forms. During the 1960’s, there were those who decried Stephen Foster’s songs as racist, but they were not. Even though some of the language seemed pejorative by late Twentieth Century standards, they were NOT racist terms in the early 19th century. Foster’s lyrics never mocked or demeaned Black people. The lyrics were mostly about home, family, poverty, nostalgia, elderly people, love, and humor.

I especially like the funny oxymorons in “Oh! Susanna”. My students do too. They get the humor, where perhaps their parents do not.

“Political Correctness” can take a lot of joy out of life!


45 posted on 02/15/2013 7:32:44 PM PST by left that other site (Worry is the darkroom that developes negatives.)
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To: left that other site

We will encounter quite a bit of the challenge of political correctness in the next few segments.


46 posted on 02/15/2013 7:33:57 PM PST by Publius
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To: left that other site

Hello! :-)


47 posted on 02/15/2013 7:36:33 PM PST by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (Learn three chords and you, too, can be a Rock Star!)
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To: AZamericonnie; ConorMacNessa; Drumbo; Kathy in Alaska; MS.BEHAVIN; LUV W; left that other site
In 1851, Stephen Foster wrote a large number of tunes that still survive. One of the problems of Foster’s career was that during his lifetime, most of his songs were considered folk music, and few knew that he was the composer. This stemmed from the fact that Foster, unlike Louis Moreau Gottschalk, was not a performer and thus did not publicize his own music. Even today most people who hear a Foster tune have no idea that he wrote it.

The second problem was financial. Foster, like Irving Berlin a century later, counted every nickel and knew where it went. After having “Oh! Susanna” pirated out from under him, he took great care to make sure that the royalties from the sales of his sheet music went to his bank account, not somebody else’s. That of course assumed the honesty of his publishers in a rough business. He made nothing from performing rights. Foster insisted on his own handwritten contracts with his publishers, and they are the earliest known contracts between publishers and individual songwriters in America.

This tune is best known for Irish tenor John McCormack’s 1934 performance. As a student of Schubert’s songs, I can’t help but notice that the piano accompaniment sounds a lot like his classic song “Alinde”. That German music teacher was thorough!

Foster: “Sweetly She Sleeps, My Alice Fair”

Political correctness has kept this one under wraps in the modern era, which is why the melody is often heard, but not the lyrics. It’s a great toe-tapper.

”Ring, Ring de Banjo!”

Beautiful and contemplative. This is one from the heart.

”Laura Lee”

This is the song with its original, politically incorrect lyrics. It was not a hit during Foster’s lifetime, but became popular in the early 20th Century. It’s now his most popular tune and the Florida state song.

”Old Folks at Home”

A fine song, beautifully sung.

”In the Eye Abides the Heart”

This is another one of his plantation songs.

”Farewell My Lilly Dear”

48 posted on 02/15/2013 7:38:30 PM PST by Publius
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To: 2LT Radix jr; acad1228; AirForceMom; Colonel_Flagg; AliVeritas; aomagrat; ariamne; armyavonlady; ...




Music for our Troops, Veterans,
and their families!!

Chris Botti~What'll I Do

If you would like to support the artists
you hear in the Canteen,
please go to the top of the thread.

Please ping any DJ to song requests
made on the thread. Thank you!

49 posted on 02/15/2013 7:40:13 PM PST by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos!)
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To: Publius

Looks like I am gonna have lots of opportunities for wallerin’ this weekend! :) You’re doin’ good stuff!


50 posted on 02/15/2013 7:42:15 PM PST by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos!)
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To: Publius

I have noticed that some of the you tube videos of these songs contain obsequious apologies regarding the 19th century Political Incorrectness! (sigh)


51 posted on 02/15/2013 7:43:34 PM PST by left that other site (Worry is the darkroom that developes negatives.)
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To: LUV W

You’ll need a box of tissues for some of these songs.


52 posted on 02/15/2013 7:44:06 PM PST by Publius
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To: Kathy in Alaska; acad1228; Allegra; Army Air Corps; Arrowhead1952; bannie; beachn4fun; BIGLOOK; ...
Made it back & too tired to open everything up again so going to post a couple of "utubes" I enjoyed this week.

Incredible Little Boy named Brendon Shocks a Guitar Store Owner

53 posted on 02/15/2013 7:45:02 PM PST by AZamericonnie
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To: left that other site

Political correctness taints everything it touches.


54 posted on 02/15/2013 7:45:18 PM PST by Publius
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To: Publius

Thanks for the early warning! :)


55 posted on 02/15/2013 7:46:29 PM PST by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos!)
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To: 2LT Radix jr; acad1228; AirForceMom; Colonel_Flagg; AliVeritas; aomagrat; ariamne; armyavonlady; ...




Music for our Troops, Veterans,
and their families!!

Barry Manilow~Weekend In New England

If you would like to support the artists
you hear in the Canteen,
please go to the top of the thread.

Please ping any DJ to song requests
made on the thread. Thank you!

56 posted on 02/15/2013 7:47:36 PM PST by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos!)
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To: spel_grammer_an_punct_polise

Hello! :-)

I make sure my little rock stars learn at LEAST Four Chords!

hahahahaha


57 posted on 02/15/2013 7:48:16 PM PST by left that other site (Worry is the darkroom that developes negatives.)
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To: AZamericonnie

Computer stuff can wear ya out! Get a good night’s rest and maybe it’ll be easier in the morning! :)


58 posted on 02/15/2013 7:48:53 PM PST by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos!)
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To: Publius

Yes it does!

Thank You for tonight’s series.

I am really enjoying it!


59 posted on 02/15/2013 7:52:09 PM PST by left that other site (Worry is the darkroom that developes negatives.)
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To: AZamericonnie; ConorMacNessa; Drumbo; Kathy in Alaska; MS.BEHAVIN; LUV W; left that other site
In 1852, the 26 year old Stephen Foster and his wife took a belated honeymoon via river boat from Pittsburgh to New Orleans and back. This was the only time that Foster actually saw the South, which has to be the greatest irony of his short life.

Foster did not knock out his songs in a slapdash manner. Like George Gershwin and Paul McCartney, he worked over the smallest details in his songs to get the idea down in a way that was immediately accessible to his audiences.

In 1853, Foster moved to New York to be closer to his publishers, and in that year he wrote one of his best songs. This version uses all the verses, politically incorrect and otherwise.

Foster: “My Old Kentucky Home”

This is Nelson Eddy singing one of the great sentimental weepers of the era about a man and his dog. I learned this song in grade school.

”Old Dog Tray”

In 1854, Foster relocated to Hoboken to make room for his wife, who had come out from Pittsburgh. Thomas Hampson does this classic justice.

Foster: “I Dream of Jeanie With the Light Brown Hair’

60 posted on 02/15/2013 7:54:10 PM PST by Publius
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