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Teacher Resigns in Scathing YouTube Video Targeting Standardized Education
The Blaze ^ | 5/28/13 | Jonathon M. Seidl

Posted on 05/28/2013 9:13:04 AM PDT by Impala64ssa

As parents in several states have stood up against standardized education such as Common Core and CSCOPE, one teacher in the Chicago area (Highland Park) has taken a similar (although not necessarily directly related) stand that is now going viral.

Last week, 15-year teaching veteran Ellie Rubenstein posted a 10-minute YouTube video where she decried the state of test-centric eduction after the district she was working in said it was going to be transferring her and several other teachers– a move she says came because those teachers were vocal about their issues and one she says the district has attributed to concerns over the school’s “poor climate.”

“This is a total kangaroo court, a retaliation against four teachers who are quite vocal in advocating for their children,” Rubenstein said in an interview last week. “We are at the forefront of speaking our minds and at the forefront of advocating for our students. We are all being falsely accused by the administration and some colleagues of doing things we have never done, and saying things we have never said.”

Frustrated and out of options, Rubenstein decided to resign instead of face the transfer — and she did it in a way that has garnered over 350,000 views.

Among her concerns that have now gone viral: •“I have experienced the depressing, gradual downfall and misdirection of education that has slowly eaten away at my love of teaching.” •“The emphasis in eduction has shifted from fostering academic and personal growth in both students and teachers, to demanding uniformity and conformity.” •“Raising students’ test scores on standardized tests is now the only goal, and in order to achieve it the creativity, flexibility and spontaneity … have been eliminated.” •“Everything I loved about teaching is extinct.” •“Curriculum is mandated. … The classroom teacher is no longer trusted or in control of what, when, or how she teaches.” •She says complaint forms and write-ups are being used as tools to target teachers and keep them as “yes men,” instead of being used to get rid of poor educators — and she even takes a shot at the union.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; US: Illinois
KEYWORDS: education; highlandpark; thechicagoway
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Video at link. BTW, how's that outcome based education working out? Your school taxes at work.
1 posted on 05/28/2013 9:13:04 AM PDT by Impala64ssa
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To: Impala64ssa

Celebrate Diversity in Education, Implement Centralized Stanardized National Control over all School Planning!!!

Diversity in Everything,
Except Thought!!!!

Nothing says Diversity like demanding all the states do the exact same thing.


2 posted on 05/28/2013 9:17:37 AM PDT by GraceG
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To: Impala64ssa
I don't like the test-centric education. But, the teachers brought it on themselves.

It's impossible to get rid of a bad teacher. And students were graduating without even basic skills in math, writing, and reading comprehension.

Rather than taking ownership of the problem and dealing with problem teachers, the teacher's unions used it as a vehicle to get more money -- for the same poor outcome.

Standardized testing is nothing but a last-ditch effort to hold teachers accountable. Until they become accountable on their own, they will have to deal with the tests.

3 posted on 05/28/2013 9:21:01 AM PDT by justlurking (tagline removed, as demanded by Admin Moderator)
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To: justlurking

Totally agree with your last point. Teachers don’t seem to want to propose an actual, verifiable, and repeatable method for assessing the quality of their work. Test scores aren’t perfect, but they are a way of measuring what someone knows/doesn’t know. They aren’t perfect, but they are what we have.

That being said, I learned more useful math in an 8th grade class totally geared to smoking the Catholic High School Entrance Test than I learned in the following high school and 2 college math classes I took afterwards.


4 posted on 05/28/2013 9:28:03 AM PDT by perez24 (Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap.)
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To: GraceG

“Diversity in Everything,
Except Thought!!!!”

...and action.


5 posted on 05/28/2013 9:28:30 AM PDT by MichaelCorleone (Keep your eyes on Jesus. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever.)
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To: GraceG

: /

Brings to mind a favorite G.Washington quote -

“Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”

Dear Lord, give us strength.
Tatt


6 posted on 05/28/2013 9:29:50 AM PDT by thesearethetimes... ("Courage, is fear that has said its prayers." Dorothy Bernard)
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To: perez24
"That being said, I learned more useful math in an 8th grade class totally geared to smoking the Catholic High School Entrance Test than I learned in the following high school and 2 college math classes I took afterwards."

Nothing like a little pressure to focus the mind....

7 posted on 05/28/2013 9:36:33 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Impala64ssa

Well, obviously the described abuses of the school are wrong, if true. But the education system wasn’t working before, either.
I do think schools should have some accountability and that includes testing. Class valedictorians were showing up at 4 year universities unable to write at a high school level - I know because I tutored them to help prepare them for college level English classes. They felt like it was a hoax because they were at the top of their class in high school, straight A’s.
When schools began using graduation exams, cries of racism emerged along with the statistics - fewer Hispanics and African Americans were graduating. Yet when students graduated regardless of whether they could read or write, cries of racism emerged when statistics revealed an obvious difference in economic outcome for school graduates; if they all graduated from high school, why were minorities making less money? Instead of correctly identifying differences in education levels attained, the difference was attributed to racism.
I don’t want schools to abuse teachers. I don’t like Common Core. But the arguments against them are no different from the arguments fielded against any attempts at accountability in decades gone by.
I used to read Education Weekly every week. Every issue featured a “new” education approach on the cover. Then the following week that approach would drop from the radar, never to be heard of again (with the exception of scandal) and a “new” approach to educating students would replace it on the cover. Child centered education (self-esteem focused) wasn’t working. I don’t think testing is the problem; any tool employed by teachers can likewise be abused by administration.


8 posted on 05/28/2013 9:39:35 AM PDT by ransomnote
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To: Impala64ssa

It’s more like “Common Whore” than Common Core.


9 posted on 05/28/2013 9:43:18 AM PDT by NRA1995 (I'd rather be a living "gun culture" member than a dead anti-gun candy-ass.)
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To: justlurking

The problem is trying to get apples from a persimmon tree. Public education is a failed concept. Education is a moral exercise. Once that’s understood you’re left with the question: Whose morals are taught? Public education must either be based on a cacophony of divergent moralities by which nothing can be learned, or based on one neglecting all others. That one moral code is Humanism, but in a republic, the government’s established religion will constantly be under siege. Common Core will end all of that once and for all, and public education will be 100% dedicated to propping up the regime. Once the regime acquires a taste for that, they’ll no longer tolerate any other form of education.

When that happens, borrowing from the sagacious Ted Nugent, I’ll be dead or in prison.


10 posted on 05/28/2013 9:46:12 AM PDT by demshateGod (The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.)
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To: Impala64ssa
I am always a little skeptical of educators screaming about “creativity€ in elementary education. Young minds say 5 to 15 are generally simply neurologically ill equipped to handle ambiguity, probability and vagueness and “creativity”. Most people are not importantly creative. Most teachers are never going to produce an Isaac Newton, Henry Ford, John Locke, Gauss etc. Children need certainty. In mathematics they need an algorithmic approach, in history they need facts such as George Washington crossed the Delaware not the intricacies of Federalist policies in 1787. etc. etc. They can learn to handle the uncertainties of life at about 18 to 25
11 posted on 05/28/2013 9:46:15 AM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: ransomnote

The path ahead....needs to be a simplified tests that a 10th grader can take, and if successful...they are graduated there on the spot, and at sixteen, move onto local community college. We could take ten percent of the kids and move them on easily. Repeat the same situation in the eleventh grade, and thirty percent of them would likely move on. We could then concentrate on the punks who have issues and simply get them to a point of being acceptable to graduate.


12 posted on 05/28/2013 9:47:39 AM PDT by pepsionice
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To: Impala64ssa
..decent teachers don't have a chance in this climate--needless to say the children

these educational establishment NEA - CTA Koolaid types are like beings from another planet--dressed in Karl Marx tee shirts...

13 posted on 05/28/2013 9:47:51 AM PDT by WalterSkinner ( In Memory of My Father--WWII Vet and Patriot 1926-2007)
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To: Impala64ssa

Only an idiot or liberal would voluntarily send their child to a public school.


14 posted on 05/28/2013 9:48:25 AM PDT by ALPAPilot
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To: justlurking
As Con Fu Tse ~ (Confucius) figured out early in the game of creating an educated elite who knew enough to make things work, without standard texts and tests you get a bunch of idiots who get where they are because of who their mothers marry ~ so, the texts and tests ~ and this 3rd grade teacher imagines herself at least the equal of Confucius.

TRANSFER HER TO KONG ISLAND!

15 posted on 05/28/2013 9:48:30 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: ransomnote

I’m always amazed how sincere, dedicated conservatives seek to reform and reform the most Marxist institution in our country’s history instead of demolishing it.


16 posted on 05/28/2013 9:49:43 AM PDT by demshateGod (The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.)
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To: perez24
Totally agree with your last point. Teachers don’t seem to want to propose an actual, verifiable, and repeatable method for assessing the quality of their work. Test scores aren’t perfect, but they are a way of measuring what someone knows/doesn’t know. They aren’t perfect, but they are what we have.

Teachers often like to sound high-minded when it comes to talking about actual results. I don't care if you're "fostering a love of learning" if the kids in your class aren't reading at grade-level. Less "fostering" and more "reading, writing and rithmetic."

17 posted on 05/28/2013 9:52:25 AM PDT by the808bass
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To: ALPAPilot

“Only an idiot or liberal would voluntarily send their child to a public school.”

Most libs I know, that can afford to, send their kids to private schools.


18 posted on 05/28/2013 9:53:22 AM PDT by Huskrrrr
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To: AEMILIUS PAULUS

That’s true, but the rote learning of facts must all be focused on achieving a moral goal. For a Christian, all education must be designed to conform us into the image of Christ. Government schools can’t do that.


19 posted on 05/28/2013 9:54:18 AM PDT by demshateGod (The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.)
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To: Impala64ssa
This is BS and union teachers whining because they have to start teaching something of value that can be measured.

For years they have sat on their fat asses spewing Marxism and passing dummies on to the next grade without knowing anything.

After 12 years they hand the illiterates a diploma and go on vacation for 3 months.

I'd fire every public school teacher, outlaw their union, and start from scratch.

20 posted on 05/28/2013 9:58:51 AM PDT by Beagle8U (Free Republic -- One stop shopping ....... It's the Conservative Super WalMart for news .)
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To: Impala64ssa
The problem with our education system is we don't teach kids "how to learn" anymore.

And, the way you teach kids to learn is to have them question everything and then test the answers for accuracy and truth. (A.K.A. the Socratic Method)

But how can you do that in a system that shuns both. Liberals run our education system and they despise accuracy and truth because both expose the flaws in their theories.

21 posted on 05/28/2013 10:02:58 AM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: Impala64ssa

What is a school today? It’s a transient system, it’s a sports arena, it’s a doctors office, it’s mental health program, it’s a social workers office, it’s a police station, it’s a political tool, it a restaurant, and it’s a drug store. Did I miss anything?


22 posted on 05/28/2013 10:08:45 AM PDT by Moonbug
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To: the808bass
I don't care if you're "fostering a love of learning" if the kids in your class aren't reading at grade-level. Less "fostering" and more "reading, writing and rithmetic."

Very few of my teachers from the 60s and 70s remain alive but I'd sure like to have had this type of discussion with them. I have fond memories of lots of "fostering" going on at the same time as the 3Rs. I did have a great conversation with my 6th grade teacher/principal after I was an adult, through college and the military and out in the world of work. He had some interesting recollections about class sizes in those "Baby Boom" days (ca.1966), with my group having about 35 students. I suspect such a class size would induce an attack of "the vapors" for today's teachers.

23 posted on 05/28/2013 10:10:35 AM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: Moonbug
"Did I miss anything?"

Indoctrination center...?

24 posted on 05/28/2013 10:11:26 AM PDT by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: ALPAPilot

That should be true. That intelligent people and conservatives do that proves how seductive Marxism is.

I think people who believe like you and me have a problem. We think we’re a success because our homeschools and private schools are not public school. Our kids are no more literate than many public school kids and not demonstrably better thinkers. There’s certainly a larger percentage of government school products who amount to something short of human debris, but that’s nothing to be proud of. The vast ocean of ignorance testifies to our failure as defenders of civilization.

We should do what’s in our power to make sure our kids get the same education that the greatest thinkers in human history got. I hope to provide my kids with a systematic, integrated paradigm that will produce and unassailable apologetic. All truth is God’s truth and when historical causes and affects are filtered through scripture, then scripture (God) is glorified.

I’m rambling.


25 posted on 05/28/2013 10:15:57 AM PDT by demshateGod (The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.)
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To: Moonbug

Whore house. Meat market. Singles club.


26 posted on 05/28/2013 10:18:11 AM PDT by demshateGod (The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.)
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To: T-Bird45
I suspect such a class size would induce an attack of "the vapors" for today's teachers.

LOL!

I started 1st grade in 1966 - there were at least 50 to a class and by the time I hit 8th grade there were still close to that many in my class, although lower grades had started getting smaller, from smaller enrollment numbers. In HS there were about 35 to a home room and classes ranged from 25- 35. My daughter is now in 9th grade and she says most of her classes are between 25 and 30, with the exception of her French class - that has only 11.

27 posted on 05/28/2013 10:19:14 AM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: demshateGod

What you say is correct. However, I disagree with the implication that government schools cannot teach Christ. I lived with religion in public schools; in California no less! We said prayer every morning. We went to church once a week during school time. It was not until the late 1940’s that the attack on expressions of Christianity in public schools started. I think a well researched and presented history of the individuals and groups involved in the attack against our religious expression would be invaluable.


28 posted on 05/28/2013 10:19:42 AM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: AEMILIUS PAULUS
Most people are not importantly creative.

Amen. Classical education never worried about creativity. You had it or you didn't. But you damned well better have learned Latin, Greek, History, and Mathematics.

What you did with those eventually was up to you.

29 posted on 05/28/2013 10:19:45 AM PDT by BfloGuy (Don't try to explain yourself to liberals; you're not the jackass-whisperer.)
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To: pepsionice

First time I heard this suggestion - sounds good. I think some students would push themselves to learn in order to exit with the first group.
Content “stabilizes” after 8th grade anyway so a portion of the students just tread water those last two years, having learned the core and now faced with repeating it until graduation.


30 posted on 05/28/2013 10:25:32 AM PDT by ransomnote
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To: Moonbug

What is a school today? It’s a transient system, it’s a sports arena, it’s a doctors office, it’s mental health program, it’s a social workers office, it’s a police station, it’s a political tool, it a restaurant, and it’s a drug store. Did I miss anything?

How about daycare? It’s also daycare.


31 posted on 05/28/2013 10:29:55 AM PDT by austinaero
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To: Impala64ssa
a retaliation against four teachers who are quite vocal in advocating for their children

No, you're advocating for you i.e. you want the public's yardstick removed. You see, the public have spent billions and received ignorance, sloth and the rest of the seven deadlies. We give you children and you give us Junior Marxists who can't make change, can't put air in a tire and have no idea who Andrew Carnegie or Napoleon were.

Tests are a last resort in objective measurement. The fact that teachers resent them tells us all we need to know about the teachers, not the tests themselves.

32 posted on 05/28/2013 10:39:47 AM PDT by relictele (A place dedicated to economic, racial and social equality. It was called Jonestown.)
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To: justlurking

Post of the day.


33 posted on 05/28/2013 10:46:45 AM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Posting from deep behind the Maple Curtain)
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I’m always amused by the constant crying of teach to the test. If you taught the kids how to think and solve problems, they should be able to solve any problem on the test. I have seen these tests, and especially the “graduation tests” that have been moaned about so greatly, and in my opinion, any 7th grader from “my day” should have had no problem acing it. I was obviously not “taught to the test”, and even with decades behind me and school I still find the questions laughably easy.


34 posted on 05/28/2013 10:50:19 AM PDT by dsrtsage (One half of all people have below average IQ. In the US the number is 54%)
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To: justlurking

I was lazy (or overeager perhaps) and posted my mostly redundant response before reading yours.

I get annoyed when people do that to me so apologies offered.


35 posted on 05/28/2013 10:56:35 AM PDT by relictele (A place dedicated to economic, racial and social equality. It was called Jonestown.)
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To: austinaero

It’s also a recruitment station for homosexuality through the attempted normalization of destructive behavior and thought as well as the Orwellian curriculum that outlaws any negative mention of gays or their actions.


36 posted on 05/28/2013 10:58:30 AM PDT by relictele (A place dedicated to economic, racial and social equality. It was called Jonestown.)
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To: Impala64ssa

Reading a bit of the back story, the elementary school had 3 different principals in 4 years and apparently the common thread running through their exit interviews was problem teachers with negative attitudes. Rather than let a few teachers spoil the school, they transferred them (what schools do to problem teachers). I would hazard a guess that this was a last resort step to solve the problem. And rather than face up to the fact that she was a problem employee, Ms. Rubinstein took to YouTube with lofty language that she hoped would resonate.


37 posted on 05/28/2013 11:00:02 AM PDT by the808bass
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To: justlurking

I recently retired from public school teaching. I don’t have a problem with holding bad teachers responsible. But I think that the real problem lies with trying to hold the students and their parents responsible. The thing that is killing public education is the fact that the public schools must accept every warm body that shows up. The more problems and ‘handicaps’ a child has the more rights he or she is given. The mainstreaming of problem children means that your normal child gets to learn in a circus atmosphere. Parents who know the score and have the means pull their kids out for parochial/private/home schooling—which makes the public school worse.

When I started teaching, each teacher had a paddle. If a kid crossed the line, three swats were given (with all the class doors open, to encourage the others). Twenty years ago the paddles were taken away—only the principal paddled. Five or six years ago the principal gave that up. Over the years minor punishments were taken away—sentences (like Bart Simpson), standing at the board, sending into the hall, etc, etc all taken away. All tha teachers can now do at my old school is send a child to a ‘safe seat’, if the behavior continues the kid is sent to a ‘buddy room’ where he or she fills out a form and returns. Sending a child to the principal is frowned on and requires the filling out of a long form. Suspensions do occur, but are rare because ‘that’s just what he wants’ and of course cost the school money. And God help a district if the percent of protected classes being suspended is to high.

Of course kids get passed on to the next grade regardless of what he or she has learned. Who wants a 15-year old in the fifth grade? Certainly not the parent of a normal fifth-grader. The best we can hope for is that he will be quiet in his eighth-grade class and let the others learn. If he can’t be quiet, then the others (including the teacher) will have to do their best in spite of him.

I don’t think teachers really asked for any of this. All of these things tend to get passed on from the top downward. In the last twenty years the top has been in Washington rather that the state capitals or local school boards. There are good public schools left—but that’s in spite of not because of the current trends.


38 posted on 05/28/2013 11:14:20 AM PDT by hanamizu
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To: hanamizu

Teachers I know stopped reporting bad behavior on paper because it’s always the black kids misbehaving, and the teacher will be a documented racist if they keep reporting actual incidents.


39 posted on 05/28/2013 11:17:17 AM PDT by Uncle Miltie ("The White House can't be trusted." - Ron Fournier, National Journal)
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To: Impala64ssa
 photo TEACH_zpsdcf35541.jpg
40 posted on 05/28/2013 11:34:10 AM PDT by baddog 219
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To: Impala64ssa; All
What you're not going to hear from Obama guard dog Glenn Beck about people like this misguided teacher is the following.

Your kids would never learn anything about the Constitution from this upset "teacher" (babysitter?) as evidenced by the following. This veteran teacher evidently doesn't understand that, given the Constitution's silence about public schools, the Founding States had made the 10th Amendment to clarify that government power to regulate things like public schools is automatically reserved uniquely to the states, not the feds. So public school administrators can completely ignore the federal Common Core program if they want to.

Also, public school administrator / teacher concern about getting screwed out of federal funding if they don't kiss up to the feds is just as unfounded. More specifically, another thing that "educators" evidently need to learn about the Constitution is that Justice John Marshall had officially clarified that Congress cannot lay taxes in the name of state power issues.

"Congress is not empowered to tax for those purposes which are within the exclusive province of the States." --Justice John Marshall, Gibbons v. Ogden, 1824.

So not only do educators evidently not know the Constitution well enough to know that the federal government has no constitutional authority to tell states what to teach your kids in the public schools, but based on Justice Marshall's official clarification of Congress's limited power to lay taxes, neither can Congress lay taxes in the name of funding public schools to indoctrinate your kids.

So public schools are actually wrongly bowing down to the feds because of their inexcusable ignorance of the federal government's constitutionally limited powers.

What a mess! :^(

41 posted on 05/28/2013 11:46:18 AM PDT by Amendment10
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To: hanamizu

Based on your 20+ years of teaching, how would you measure a teacher’s success?


42 posted on 05/28/2013 11:48:15 AM PDT by perez24 (Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap.)
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To: Impala64ssa

Put an archived web cam in every public school classroom, and all the problems would disappear. Incompetent and political teachers would be driven out rapidly.


43 posted on 05/28/2013 12:11:24 PM PDT by Atlas Sneezed (Universal Background Check -> Registration -> Confiscation -> Oppression -> Extermination)
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To: Amendment10

So public schools are actually wrongly bowing down to the feds because of their inexcusable ignorance of the federal government’s constitutionally limited powers.
__________

the same is true of states accepting medicaid expansion ...for the money.

There are MANY teachers who work very hard to actually teach and are NOT leftists entrenched in union thuggery. It is good to remind readers WHO controls the message and is the message (news) accurate in terms of generalizing ALL teachers are politically motivated.

It sounded to me as if she was NOT the only teacher who was raising concern about the changes to curriculum, again demonstrating that there ARE teachers with appropriate educational goals for students.

Audio interview here - Local teacher superbly explains resignation on YouTube

http://wgnradio.com/2013/05/23/local-teacher-superbly-explains-resignation-on-youtube/


44 posted on 05/28/2013 12:43:20 PM PDT by Whenifhow
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To: Atlas Sneezed

You would think so. We thought by putting camera on school busses, that behavior would improve—but you can’t show the little terror’s parents his misbehavior unless you blur out all of the other children’s faces. Without video proof (and sometimes even with it!) parents can and will deny anything ever happened.

Yes there are incompetent/political teachers out there, but believe it or not, they are not what is killing public education. It is a combination of a major societal breakdown of a significant proportion of the schools’ population combined with an attitude that the bell-shaped curve applies to everything in nature except scholastic aptitude.


45 posted on 05/28/2013 12:44:03 PM PDT by hanamizu
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To: Impala64ssa
Anyone who speaks out against the Dept. of Education and all of the other multitudinous bureaucracies that control the propagandizing of children today in the name of "educating" them must be willing to be marginalized by the media and politicians.

Even as early as the Year 1886, such was the case. A man by the name of Zach. Montgomery was denied an important post in government for doing just that. You will read some of his words below.

With that said, those who love liberty must be willing to come forward to declare that it is better to be remembered for standing on and articulating enduring principles of right versus wrong, liberty versus tyranny, than to be praised by the mainstream media and so-called "progressives."

I am reminded of the words of Zach. Montgomery in his 1886 Book entitled "Poison Drops in the United States Senate . . . ." Although his treatise dealt primarily with the public school question, the following remarks might be helpful to those who, today, are concerned by what passes for "public education."

Excerpts from Montgomery:

"My countrymen, disguise the fact as we may, there is in this country to-day, and in both the political Parties, an element which is ripe for a centralized despotism. There are men and corporations of vast wealth, whose iron grasp spans this whole continent, and who find it more difficult and more expensive to corrupt thirty odd State Legislatures than one Federal Congress. It was said of Nero of old that he wished the Roman people had but one head, so that he might cut it off at a single blow. And so it is with those moneyed kings who would rule this country through bribery, fraud, and intimidation.

"It is easy to see how, with all the powers of government centered at Washington in one Federal head, they could at a single stroke put an end to American liberty.

"But they well understand that before striking this blow the minds of the people must be prepared to receive it. And what surer or safer preparation could possibly be made than is now being made, by indoctrinating the minds of the rising generation with the idea that ours is already a consolidated government ; that the States of the Union have no sovereignty which is not subordinate to the will and pleasure of the Federal head, and that our Constitution is the mere creature of custom, and may therefore be legally altered or abolished by custom.

"Such are a few of the pernicious and poisonous doctrines which ten millions of American children are today drinking in with the very definitions of the words they are compelled to study. And yet the man who dares to utter a word of warning of the approaching danger is stigmatized as an enemy to education and unfit to be men tioned as a candidate for the humblest office.

"Be it so. Viewing this great question as I do, not for all the offices in the gift of the American people would I shrink from an open and candid avowal of my sentiments. If I have learned anything from the reading of history, it is that the man who, in violation of great principles, toils for temporary fame, purchases for himself either total oblivion or eternal infamy, while he who temporarily goes down battling for right principles always deserves, and generally secures, the gratitude of succeeding ages, and will carry with him the sustaining solace of a clean conscience, more precious than all the offices and honors in the gift of man.

"History tells us that Aristides was voted into banishment because he was just. Yet who would not a thousand times rather today be Aristides than be numbered amongst the proudest of his persecutors.

"Socrates, too, in violation of every principle of justice, was con demned to a dungeon and to death. Yet what name is more honored in history than his? And which of his unjust judges would not gladly, hide himself in the utter darkness of oblivion from the with ering scorn and contempt of all mankind ?

"From the noble example of Aristides and of Socrates let American statesmen learn wisdom, and from the undying infamy of their cow ardly time-serving persecutors let political demagogues of today take warning."

So said Zacharias Montgomery in 1886. Read his complete work at HERE.

Anyone who reads his complete volume will realize this man's ability to see the consequences of what his fellow Americans were advocating in the area of education of youth.

46 posted on 05/28/2013 12:54:05 PM PDT by loveliberty2
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To: perez24

A fair question. I was always pleased when my students did well on their standardized tests. But since I taught a nonessential subject—jr. high history—standardized tests were dropped because of the expenses involved. (No, the tests aren’t free and after a while one can start to question whether the expense is worthwhile). I always measured my own success as a teacher by what my graduates told me of their high school experiences. If they said that high school history was easy compared to my classes, then I figured I had done my job well.

But let me ask you a question, if I may. Of all the teachers you had, at all of the levels of education you attained, how many of them do you remember fondly? If you are like most, you can count them on the fingers of one hand. You know what I mean, the ones who somehow made a connection with you and many of your fellow students. What made them stand out? Test scores?

In my opinion, teaching well is so much more an
art than it is a science. All that making good test scores the be-all and end -all of schools is that in the future there will be no remembered teachers, because they will interchangeable clones of one another. Everyone will be mediocre.


47 posted on 05/28/2013 1:06:29 PM PDT by hanamizu
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To: hanamizu

“fills out a form” ~ ? ~ now there’s a leftwingtard idea of punishment for ya’ ~ “fills out a form” and I’m thinking of that original ObamaKKKare application form ~ WOW! 60 pages!


48 posted on 05/28/2013 1:07:30 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Impala64ssa

Privatize it all. Erase everything that Susan B. Anthony and her friends most wanted.


49 posted on 05/28/2013 1:56:13 PM PDT by familyop (We Baby Boomers are croaking in an avalanche of rotten politics smelled around the planet.)
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To: familyop

Bookmark


50 posted on 05/28/2013 3:18:48 PM PDT by publius911 (Look for the Union label, then buy something else.)
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