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Connecticut Senate passes bill writing Wright Brothers out of history
FoxNews.com ^ | 6-5-2013 | Jeremy A. Kaplan

Posted on 06/05/2013 10:11:10 AM PDT by servo1969

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To: SunkenCiv; wildbill; servo1969; ClearCase_guy; N. Theknow; cumbo78; Maine Mariner; ...

MMmmmm K.

He traveled 700 feet in 16-18 seconds on some glider covered in feathers?

Well, he was traveling about 40 miles per hour.

How did he land and stop his vehicle at that speed?

And the Wright Brothers legacy isn’t in peril:
On December 17, 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first sustained, controlled flights in a powered aircraft.


151 posted on 06/07/2013 7:05:28 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: SunkenCiv

So some idiot tried to fly a kite covered in feathers and it fell down.

Retarded state. Must be something in the water.


152 posted on 06/07/2013 7:25:28 PM PDT by Hardraade (http://junipersec.wordpress.com (Obama equals Osama))
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To: SunkenCiv
We're talking powered flight. If Childs had had an engine, he'd have been a contender.

Engines were Whitehead's forte. Engine building is the talent that probably lead to his being first to achieve powered flight. It is claimed that one of his motors powered the first military plane, which was financed by the US Navy and built by Israel Ludlow. In 1908, it took off from the Smithsonian's front lawn, of all places.

153 posted on 06/07/2013 7:36:48 PM PDT by cynwoody
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To: Clemenza
Sorry, but the first true powered flight was Alberto Santos Dumont.

We're talking about powered, controlled flight in a heavier-than-air vehicle. Dirigibles don't count.


154 posted on 06/07/2013 7:47:39 PM PDT by cynwoody
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To: cynwoody

Earlier (than the Wright Bros, who were first) attempts at powered flight were doomed by the weight of the power plants available to the builders, heavy steam engines for example.

There’s a myth about a medieval Chinese emperor who had skyrockets attached to his throne and launched himself into the sky, but that is presumably a bit of nationalist agitprop from the 20th c. That would count as powered flight, if true.

When the Swedish flagship Kronan exploded in the Battle of Oland (1676), one of the survivors was blown far into the air, saw all the ships on both sides from up there, and miraculously landed safely in the billows of a sail. Had this happened during a later era, there would have been no sails, and he’d have also lost his priority as the survivor of the earliest powered flight. ;’)

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/3028784/posts


155 posted on 06/08/2013 6:53:00 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (McCain would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: wastedyears; Vendome; Hardraade

If memory serves, Orville Wright’s last flight was with Howard Hughes.


156 posted on 06/08/2013 6:57:49 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (McCain would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: Vendome

40 mph would be 58 ft/s, he flew about 30 miles per hour.


157 posted on 06/08/2013 7:02:58 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (McCain would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I divided 700 feet by 16 seconds arrive at my figure but, even so I am interested as to how he stopped the airplane .


158 posted on 06/08/2013 7:22:32 AM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: SunkenCiv

Really? Kewel ...


159 posted on 06/08/2013 7:22:58 AM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: SunkenCiv

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwN6efmhp7E


160 posted on 06/08/2013 11:30:30 AM PDT by Lonesome in Massachussets (Doing the same thing and expecting different results is called software engineering.)
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To: Lonesome in Massachussets
There is simply no doubt that the Wright Brothers were the first to make a controlled flight, and clearly all subsequent successful airframes trace are descended from the Wright Flyer without exception.

Actually, there is a fundamental design difference between the Wright Brothers' Flyer and all modern aircraft: the Flyer was designed so that in the absence of force from the elevators, it would assume a slight upward pitch, while modern aircraft are designed to assume a downward pitch. This meant two things--one bad, but one good:

  1. If the airplane's speed fell below the minimum required to achieve a downward pitch, there would be no way to regain speed and thus avoid a relatively prompt return to Earth, regardless of altitude.
  2. If the airplane's speed fell below the minimum required to achieve a downward pitch, it would remain below the minimum required to achieve a downward pitch; given friendly terrain, the consequent landing would be survivable for both the plane and occupants.
For today's purposes, having a plane which can recover from a stall while remaining airborne is more important than having a plane which, if only flown over friendly terrain, would be able to land safely in such case (especially since planes often need to fly over unfriendly terrain). On the other hand, in the early days of flight, being able to survive undesired landings was far more important than being able to reduce their frequency. Once the plane was developed well enough that one could reasonably expect not to be forced into an unwanted landing, then the controls could be reversed to the modern style.
161 posted on 06/08/2013 12:43:44 PM PDT by supercat (Renounce Covetousness.)
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To: wastedyears
First powered, sustained flight. I don’t see how a glider fits into powered.

If prior to the Wright Brothers' flight someone had produced a glider which was sufficiently efficient that it could remain aloft indefinitely in the presence of naturally-occurring thermals or other updrafts, I would have regarded such an accomplishment as being no less significant than that of the Wright Brothers. What was significant about the Wright Brothers was not that their plane was powered, but rather that it could remain aloft without continuous or repeated connection to the ground. By my understanding, all gliders before that time had enough drag that even naturally-occurring thermals would have been insufficient to keep them aloft.

162 posted on 06/08/2013 12:49:03 PM PDT by supercat (Renounce Covetousness.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Wow, really down on Lindy, huh?


163 posted on 06/08/2013 1:00:11 PM PDT by ozzymandus
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To: ozzymandus

No, I’m not. As Hitler-coddlers go, he was a pretty good guy.


164 posted on 06/08/2013 4:42:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (McCain would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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