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Russia's Proton Rocket Explodes on Launch (YouTube video 1m15s)
YouTube ^ | 7/2/13

Posted on 07/02/2013 4:18:12 PM PDT by LibWhacker

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Zl12dXYcUTo


TOPICS: News/Current Events; Russia
KEYWORDS: constellation; failure; global; glonass; navigation; positioning; proton; rocket; russia; satellites
Full Title is: Аварийный пуск ракетоносителя "Протон-М" с 3-мя космическими аппаратами Глонасс
1 posted on 07/02/2013 4:18:12 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: LibWhacker

the dickens you say


2 posted on 07/02/2013 4:19:15 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (Unindicted Co-conspirators: The Mainstream Media)
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To: LibWhacker

You misspelled the third word...

Okay, okay..., just kidding.


3 posted on 07/02/2013 4:23:14 PM PDT by DoughtyOne (Breaking News: Hillary not running in 2016. Brain tumor found during recent colonoscopy...)
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To: LibWhacker

lol


4 posted on 07/02/2013 4:23:29 PM PDT by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: LibWhacker

Nice. Splendid shockwave. Sucks to be in the satellite-insurance business, but fun to watch nonetheless.


5 posted on 07/02/2013 4:23:36 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: LibWhacker

Whoaaa—Proton? ‘Sounds serious


6 posted on 07/02/2013 4:23:36 PM PDT by freeangel ( (free speech is only good until someone else doesn't like it)
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To: LibWhacker
Chyort voz'mi!

interesting cloud from the exploding rocket - the joker?

7 posted on 07/02/2013 4:23:58 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (Unindicted Co-conspirators: The Mainstream Media)
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To: NonValueAdded

Figure we hacked into the command system?


8 posted on 07/02/2013 4:30:08 PM PDT by Oldexpat
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To: LibWhacker

It blowed up good.


9 posted on 07/02/2013 4:33:49 PM PDT by Conspiracy Guy (To stay calm during these tumultuous times, I take Damitol. Ask your Doctor if it's right for you.)
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To: freeangel

He had help from Proton Energy Pills.

10 posted on 07/02/2013 4:35:39 PM PDT by Wiggins
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To: Oldexpat

NSA is everywhere man!

(My home wireless network shall soon be renamed “NSA surveillance van #4”


11 posted on 07/02/2013 4:37:21 PM PDT by Ingtar (Everyone complains about the weather, but only Liberals try to legislate it.)
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To: LibWhacker

The failure was of the self destruct device. It should have been destructed as soon as it was apparent that it was not on true course. It could just have easily veered toward the viewers and burned them alive


12 posted on 07/02/2013 4:41:11 PM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Who will shoot Liberty Valence?)
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To: NonValueAdded

Lol, had to go back and look at it.

Wonder who is the guy crying in the background? The chief engineer contemplating his family’s upcoming move to Siberia?


13 posted on 07/02/2013 4:43:29 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: LibWhacker; 1rudeboy

I’ll follow 1rudeboy’s lead and assume the crying guy was the insurer.


14 posted on 07/02/2013 4:47:49 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (Unindicted Co-conspirators: The Mainstream Media)
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To: LibWhacker
 photo SCTVfarmreport_zpsa5075a13.jpg

That blowed up real good!

15 posted on 07/02/2013 4:52:51 PM PDT by Roccus
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To: bert

Someone with a mind for physics and mathematics can calculate how far away these spectators were . . . given that the Russians launch from BF nowhere, it’s not too likely anyone was at risk.


16 posted on 07/02/2013 4:54:49 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: bert
The failure was of the self destruct device. It should have been destructed as soon as it was apparent that it was not on true course. It could just have easily veered toward the viewers and burned them alive

I kinda think it was better they waited, or it would have destroyed the launch pad.

17 posted on 07/02/2013 4:56:17 PM PDT by Vince Ferrer
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To: LibWhacker

Looks like someone forgot to push the “Self-Destruct-In-Case-Of-Trouble” button... Or, perhaps it was pushed and didn’t work. There is some suspicious small explosion in the nose a few seconds before it hit the ground...


18 posted on 07/02/2013 5:03:31 PM PDT by LaRueLaDue
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To: All
Proton-M Mission Overview:

Tuesday’s launch was the second of the year in support of Russia’s GLONASS program. It was also the second launch of navigation satellites in twenty-four hours, following India’s PSLV launch Monday evening with the IRNSS-1A satellite.

GLONASS is a series of Russian navigation satellites analogous to the American Global Positioning System. It is designed to provide global coverage, which requires 24 operational satellites. Today’s launch will carry three satellites to plane 2 of the constellation.

The current-generation satellites in the GLONASS constellation are Uragan-M spacecraft built by NPO PM. Designed for a lifespan of up to seven years; each satellite has a mass of 1,415 kilograms (3,120 lb). The spacecraft broadcast in the L band, providing signals with an accuracy of 100 meters for civilian users, and up to ten meters for military applications.

Source: NASASpaceFlight.com
19 posted on 07/02/2013 5:13:03 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: 1rudeboy

About 1.5 miles. Sound was about 8 seconds later than eyeballs.


20 posted on 07/02/2013 5:17:40 PM PDT by willgolfforfood
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To: LaRueLaDue

I think that was just the nose module disintegrating due to aerodynamic force. The rest of the rocket came apart not too long after . . . those things are not built to fly sideways . . . .


21 posted on 07/02/2013 5:22:09 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: LibWhacker

Now give us Snowden or the next one will go boom, too.


22 posted on 07/02/2013 5:33:32 PM PDT by Crusher138 ("Then conquer we must, for our cause it is just")
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To: Ingtar

Now that’s funny.


23 posted on 07/02/2013 5:35:42 PM PDT by moovova
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To: Vince Ferrer

Agreed, since it started veering off course early.
Looks like one of the strap on boosters on the first stage failed, resulting in the thrust being off center. Thus the pitch-over. One of the six engines go out, and that’s 331,000 pounds thrust missing.


24 posted on 07/02/2013 5:38:31 PM PDT by Fred Hayek (The Democratic Party is now the operational arm of the CPUSA)
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To: 1rudeboy
...given that the Russians launch from BF nowhere,...

Look up "The Nedelin Catastrophe". Launch safety was something the Soviets had to learn the hard way. Well, ego maniacs had to think twice about, any way.

General Nedelin had an ego that wrote a check that dozens of people paid for with their lives.

25 posted on 07/02/2013 5:43:28 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: LibWhacker

Three GPS Sats go up in smoke.


26 posted on 07/02/2013 5:43:55 PM PDT by bmwcyle (People who do not study history are destine to believe really ignorant statements.)
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To: LibWhacker
Just curious, did you google Аварийный пуск ракетоносителя "Протон-М" с 3-мя космическими or did you just happen to come across it?
27 posted on 07/02/2013 5:50:03 PM PDT by Hot Tabasco (This space for rent)
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To: LibWhacker

Russian Proton-M fails at launch and crashes into spaceport

no alt

Russia launched their Proton rocket Tuesday morning local time, carrying three satellites for the GLONASS navigation system. However, liftoff from site 81/24 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome – which occurred at 02:38 UTC (08:38 local time) – ended seconds later, with a dramatic failure that resulted in a huge impact at the spaceport.


FAILURE:

The launch occurred on time, with the Proton-M lifting off as per usual in its dramatic fashion. However, the rocket almost immediately veered to one side, before trying to correct itself, in turn sending it veering in the opposite direction.

Proton FailureThe vehicle then flew horizontal, before starting to plummet back to Earth, with its engines still firing. Aerodynamic stress saw the payload fairing and upper part of the rocket collapse and disintegrate before the Proton crashed back on to the pad complex.

No immediate reports of causalities have been forthcoming, although this is a concern given the close proximity the Russian engineers stage themselves, ahead of racing back to the pad less than a minute after launch.

However, unconfirmed Russian reports cite the rocket crashed near Pad 200 at the spaceport, resulting in no causalities.

International Launch Services (ILS) also confirmed no injures, noting the impact occurred in a safe area that was evacuated for the launch and all personnel are reported to be unharmed. From early reports, there was no damage to either launch Pad 39 or 24, near the impact area; there is only minor damage to nearby buildings.

The Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) has set up a special commission to determine the cause of the failure and telemetry is currently being amassed and processed. ILS will also will conduct its own Failure Review Oversight Board (FROB).

For updates and screenshots of the failure, click here:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=31191.75

Proton-M Mission Overview:

Tuesday’s launch was the second of the year in support of Russia’s GLONASS program. It was also the second launch of navigation satellites in twenty-four hours, following India’s PSLV launch Monday evening with the IRNSS-1A satellite.

GLONASS is a series of Russian navigation satellites analogous to the American Global Positioning System. It is designed to provide global coverage, which requires 24 operational satellites. Today’s launch will carry three satellites to plane 2 of the constellation.

See Also

The current-generation satellites in the GLONASS constellation are Uragan-M spacecraft built by NPO PM. Designed for a lifespan of up to seven years; each satellite has a mass of 1,415 kilograms (3,120 lb). The spacecraft broadcast in the L band, providing signals with an accuracy of 100 meters for civilian users, and up to ten meters for military applications.

Tuesday’s launch was using Proton-M No.5115106754, also designated No.53543 and Blok DM-03 No.2L. The satellites were designated Block 47 of the GLONASS constellation, and had serial numbers 48, 49 and 50.

The Proton-M for the Glonass missionProton-M No.53543 is a “Phase I” Proton-M, incorporating upgrades compared to the original Proton-M that first flew in 2001. The first Phase I launch occurred in June 2004, with a Proton-M/Briz-M carrying Intelsat 10-02.

Unusually for a Phase I Proton, 53543′s first stage was powered by RD-276 engines, components introduced with the Phase II upgrade which have been retrofitted to a small number of Phase I Protons.

Six RD-276 engines powered the first stage. These engines were to loft the rocket for the first two minutes of flight, before the second stage was due to take over, which normally results in it igniting while still attached to the first stage, which would then be jettisoned.

The second stage was to be powered by an RD-0210 engine, for a burn of around three and a half minutes before it would have separated and the third stage’s RD-0212 engine would have ignited.

The third stage would then have been used to inject the fourth stage and payload into a low Earth parking orbit, with the fourth stage scheduled to separate from the third around nine minutes and 44 seconds after liftoff. The target orbit for third stage cutoff was a perigee of 179 kilometers, an apogee of 184 kilometers and 64.8 degrees inclination.

Blok DM-03The fourth stage was a Blok DM-03, which is powered by an RD-58MF engine. The Blok-DM series of upper stages, which are descended from the Blok-D developed as part of the N1 rocket, are preferred over the Briz-M for GLONASS launches as they provide greater insertion accuracy.

The Blok-DM was to have made two burns, the first to raise itself from the parking orbit into a transfer orbit, and then the second to circularize its orbit for spacecraft separation. The first burn was to occur 26 minutes and 23 seconds after the separation of the Blok-DM from the third stage, and would have lasted six minutes and 38 seconds.

Following the first burn, the Blok DM-03 would have coasted to apogee. Two hours, 46 minutes and 31 seconds after the end of the first burn, the second would have begun. Lasting 165 seconds, it would have raised the perigee of the Blok-DM’s orbit, reaching a 19,000-kilometre (12,000-mile) orbit at an inclination of 64.8 degrees.

Spacecraft separation would have occurred at 06:10:48 UTC, three hours, 32 minutes and 26 seconds after launch.

Proton-MTuesday’s GLONASS launch attempt was to be the second flight of the Blok DM-03 and the first flight of a Blok-DM on a Proton since the DM-03′s failed maiden flight in December 2010. That launch, which was also carrying three GLONASS satellites, failed to achieve orbit due to a fuelling error.

Propellant and oxidizer loading in Blok-D series upper stages is measured by the percentage of the tank that is full, rather than the mass or volume of fuel loaded. During fuelling ahead of the 2010 launch, the tanks were mistakenly filled to the percentages used on past launches with the Blok DM-2 upper stage, which had smaller tanks.

As a result of this, the first three stages were unable to lift the overloaded fourth stage into the planned parking orbit, and it burned up over the Pacific before it was scheduled to begin its first burn.

Prior to the introduction of the Blok DM-03, GLONASS launches were mostly made using the Blok DM-2, which appears to have now been retired. A single launch in 2002 used a Blok DM-2M upper stage.

In 2003 the unusual combination of a Proton-K and a Briz-M was used for one launch with three satellites, while the Proton-M/Briz-M was used for the most recent three-satellite launch, in November 2011. That launch had originally been slated for a Blok DM-03; however it was changed to Briz-M following the failure.

Soyuz 2-1BSince 2011 the Soyuz rocket has also been used to launch GLONASS satellites, flying in the Soyuz-2-1b configuration with a Fregat-M upper stage. As the Soyuz is smaller than the Proton, it can only carry one of the current-generation satellites per launch. To date four GLONASS launches have used Soyuz; three with Uragan-M satellites, and one with a prototype for the next-generation Uragan-K.

The Proton launched from pad 24 of site 81 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, having been erected on the pad on 28 June, following assembly at site 92A-50. Preparations for Monday’s launch included a fuelling test, with the rocket being rolled to the pad on 8 June to facilitate this before being returned to the assembly building, or MIK, four days later.

Pad 24Pad 81/24 was first used in 1967, for a Proton-K launch with a Blok-D upper stage which failed to orbit a Soyuz-L1 test flight. It was the second of the Proton’s four launch pads to enter service, following pad 23 but ahead of pads 39 and 40 at site 200.

Pad 24 was the launch site for three space stations; Salyuts 1, 4 and 6 were all launched from the complex, which has also supported missions to the Moon, Mars and Venus.

Tuesday’s launch – despite its failure – was technically the nineteenth orbital launch of a Russian or former Soviet rocket this year, a figure which includes a Soyuz launch from French Guiana, a failed Zenit launch from the Odyssey platform in the Pacific Ocean and the final flight of the Angara-derived Naro-1 rocket, launched as part of a joint venture between Russia and South Korea. It is the fifth Proton launch of the year.

The next Proton launch was expected to occur on 20 July, when a Proton-M/Briz-M will be used for a commercial launch conducted by International Launch Services, to orbit the Astra 2E satellite for SES. However, this will now be delayed, pending an investigation into Tuesday’s failure.

The Blok-DM, however, will next be used in a Zenit launch, currently scheduled for the end of August, with the Amos 4 satellite – for that launch the Blok DM-SLB configuration will be used, the next DM-03 launch will be atop another Proton in 2014, carrying either three more GLONASS satellites or the Ekspress-AM8 communications satellite.

The next GLONASS launch was expected late this year, with a Soyuz-2-1B/Fregat-M launching a single Uragan-M satellite from Plesetsk. That mission’s launch date will now be under review.

(Images via Roscosmos and Tsenki TV)

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28 posted on 07/02/2013 5:55:48 PM PDT by Rio
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To: LibWhacker

Russian spacecraft are good looking POS.


29 posted on 07/02/2013 5:59:43 PM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: 1rudeboy

Epic fireworks!


30 posted on 07/02/2013 6:17:37 PM PDT by Big Giant Head
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To: 1rudeboy

Didn’t think of that... That would explain how it looked and why it happened when it did... Yeah, flying sideways is not on the agenda...


31 posted on 07/02/2013 6:19:20 PM PDT by LaRueLaDue
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To: LibWhacker

THATS gonna leave a huge carbon footprint !


32 posted on 07/02/2013 6:41:31 PM PDT by Delta 21 (Oh Crap !! Did I say that out loud ??!??)
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To: LibWhacker
No problem. Obama will just send them another one of these:


33 posted on 07/02/2013 6:49:54 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Obama's Enemies List - Yes, you are a crook.)
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To: bert
The failure was of the self destruct device. It should have been destructed as soon as it was apparent that it was not on true course. It could just have easily veered toward the viewers and burned them alive

Did it have a self destruct?

34 posted on 07/02/2013 6:55:24 PM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: central_va

>>>Russian spacecraft are good looking POS.<<<

C’mon, their space program it too much more intensive. You can expect more mishaps too.


35 posted on 07/02/2013 7:45:23 PM PDT by cunning_fish
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To: Hot Tabasco

It was the title given to the YouTube video. At first I thought I’d run it through Google Translate and post the thread using that translation. But what came out was completely nonsensical. So I broke a longstanding FR rule and made up my own title. So far the mods have let it stand and have not banned me for it. Phew! :-)


36 posted on 07/02/2013 8:10:36 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: VeniVidiVici
Or one of these:


37 posted on 07/02/2013 8:32:58 PM PDT by carriage_hill (Guns kill people, pencils misspell words, cars drive drunk & spoons make you fat.)
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To: LibWhacker

Comforting to know the Russians are in charge of the international space station and our only way to get men back and forth there........


38 posted on 07/02/2013 9:29:47 PM PDT by Intolerant in NJ
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To: brytlea; cripplecreek; decimon; bigheadfred; KoRn; Grammy; married21; steelyourfaith; Mmogamer; ...

Perhaps the model should be renamed “Amateurishton”. ;’)

Thanks LibWhacker.

Extra to APoD members.


39 posted on 07/03/2013 3:45:26 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (McCain or Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: Moonman62

-——Did it have a self destruct?——

Can’t say for sure but there was an explosion just before it hit the ground and the big boom secondary with all the fuel.

I take that to be the selfdestruct implementation.


40 posted on 07/03/2013 4:28:31 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 ..... Who will shoot Liberty Valence?)
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To: Roccus

Lol


41 posted on 07/03/2013 5:13:08 AM PDT by Conspiracy Guy (To stay calm during these tumultuous times, I take Damitol. Ask your Doctor if it's right for you.)
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To: Ingtar
Careful. Back in the day of dial-up, I built a computer and named it NSA #1. The firewall reported over 100 pings per minute.
42 posted on 07/03/2013 5:50:23 AM PDT by kitchen (Make plans and prepare. You'll never have trouble if you're ready for it. - TR)
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To: LibWhacker

43 posted on 07/03/2013 7:40:40 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: bert

I have seen comments on other forums saying the Russians don’t use destruct. They cut off the engines. But only after a certain amount of time, so that, hopefully, the rocket has cleared the pad and is away from people.


44 posted on 07/03/2013 9:01:03 AM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: Crusher138

“Now give us Snowden or the next one will go boom, too.”

Probably hit by one of our orbiting chemical laser platforms.


45 posted on 07/03/2013 9:58:11 AM PDT by mowowie
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