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FReeper Canteen - Tunes For Our Troops - 7 June 2014
Out Troops Rock!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! | Canteen DJ's

Posted on 06/06/2014 5:59:11 PM PDT by AZamericonnie


 

 

*****

Tunes For Our Troops

*****

~ Support The Artists ~
 

Support the artists you hear throughout the Canteen!
Click on the links below! Keep the music going!

ArtistDirect Internet Radio AOL Music Sonique (Lycos) Real Radio

Live365 971TheRiver  l  GotRadio  l  Wherehouse  l  Target  l Shoutcast

AFRTS VH1 l XM Radio BET audiophile Virgin Radio Soma (Alternative)

Acaza l AudioRealm l VH1 Yahoo! Launch Music Radio Disney Live-Radio Net

ITunes l Amazon l Salsa Radio l MTV l CMT l Ticketmaster l Billboard l ClubFM


*****

Warning: Not all the music you hear below will be appropriate for children! Please click with caution. Thank you!



Tunes For The Troops
 


 


This music is provided for the entertainment of our Troops, Veterans, Allies & their families!

Enjoy the variety of musical selections that the Canteen Deejays provide throughout the thread. Please ping any DJ with your requests for the Troops!


All music is removed on Monday.
Thanks to all the DeeJay's for their time & effort providing entertainment for the Troops!

*Canteen Mission Statement*

Showing support and boosting the morale of
our military and our allies military
and the family members of the above.
Honoring those who have served before.

 

 








TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Free Republic
KEYWORDS: canteen; military; troops
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To: Publius

This is gonna be great! :)


41 posted on 06/06/2014 6:55:01 PM PDT by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!l)
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To: AZamericonnie

I am off for home and will start some tunes when I get there.

Don’t forget to rest a little. *HUGS*


42 posted on 06/06/2014 6:55:30 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: LUV W

You’re gonna love the commercials I found.


43 posted on 06/06/2014 6:56:16 PM PDT by Publius ("Who is John Galt?" by Billthedrill and Publius now available at Amazon.)
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To: Publius

I love old commercials! I have many old 1940s magazines...think LIFE....and the commercials are the best part. :)


44 posted on 06/06/2014 6:57:36 PM PDT by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!l)
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To: Publius

Hi Publius!

Thank You for your Musical Tribute to D-Day!

((((HUGS))))))


45 posted on 06/06/2014 7:01:21 PM PDT by left that other site (You shall know the Truth, and The Truth Shall Set You Free.)
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To: Kathy in Alaska
"I am off for home and will start some tunes when I get there."

Permission granted.....*followed by a sharp, military salute!*


46 posted on 06/06/2014 7:02:09 PM PDT by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (Why does every political hack think that he knows how to run my life better than I do?)
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To: AZamericonnie; ConorMacNessa; Kathy in Alaska; LUV W; MS.BEHAVIN; left that other site
YOUR HIT PARADE: 1944

A word from our sponsor.

George Fenneman for Chesterfield Cigarettes

#19 – Louis Jordan: “Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby?”

Louis Jordan (1908-75) was one of the most successful black musicians of the 20th Century. He regularly topped the R&B charts and was one of the first black recording artists to cross over into the predominantly white American audience. After Duke Ellington and Count Basie, Jordan was the most popular and successful black bandleader of his day.

He was a talented singer with great comedic flair, and he fronted his own band for more than twenty years. He worked with some of the biggest solo stars of his day, including Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong. He played every known version of the saxophone, but specialized in the alto sax, in addition to piano and clarinet.

Louis Jordan: “Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby?”

47 posted on 06/06/2014 7:03:12 PM PDT by Publius ("Who is John Galt?" by Billthedrill and Publius now available at Amazon.)
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To: AZamericonnie; Kathy in Alaska; All

What a yutz I am...I’ve ripped some of my right bicep muscles at my elbow. I can hardly move it & the Dr. told me to rest it & NO weight bearing actions....Yea right , in the next few weeks I have to start moving into our new home. I’m just gonna have to live on pain killers & ice packs until this gets done.


48 posted on 06/06/2014 7:05:02 PM PDT by TMSuchman (John 15;13 & Exodus 21:22-25 Pacem Bello Pastoribus Canes [shepard of peace,dogs of war])
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To: Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; TMSuchman; PROCON; ...


Welcome To All Who Enter This Canteen, To Our Serving Military, To Our Veterans, To All Military Families, To Our FRiends and To Our Allies!



Missing Man Setting

"The Empty Chair"

By Captain Carroll "Lex" Lefon, USN (RET), on December 21st, 2004

"In the wardroom onboard the aircraft carrier from which I recently debarked was a small, round table, with single chair. No one ever sat there, and the reasons, both for the table being there, and for the fact that the chair was always empty, will tell the reader a little bit about who we are as a culture. The wardroom, of course, is where the officers will dine; morning, noon and evening. It is not only a place to eat – it is also a kind of oasis from the sometimes dreary, often difficult exigencies of the service. A place of social discourse, of momentary relief from the burdens of the day. The only things explicitly forbidden by inviolable tradition in the wardroom are the wearing of a cover or sword by an officer not actually on watch, or conversation which touches upon politics or religion. But aboard ships which observe the custom, another implicit taboo concerns the empty chair: No matter how crowded the room, no matter who is waiting to be seated, that chair is never moved, never taken.

The table is by the main entrance to the wardroom. You will see it when you enter, and you will see it when you leave. It draws your eyes because it is meant to. And because it draws your eyes it draws your thoughts. And though it will be there every day for as long as you are at sea, you will look at it every time and your eyes will momentarily grow distant as you think for a moment. As you quietly give thanks.

AS YOU REMEMBER.

The small, round table is covered with a gold linen tablecloth. A single place setting rests there, of fine bone china. A wineglass stands upon the table, inverted, empty. On the dinner plate is a pinch of salt. On the bread plate is a slice of lemon. Besides the plate lies a bible. There is a small vase with a single red rose upon the table. Around the vase is wound a yellow ribbon. There is the empty chair.

We will remember because over the course of our careers, we will have had the opportunity to enjoy many a formal evening of dinner and dancing in the fine company of those with whom we have the honor to serve, and their lovely ladies. And as the night wears on, our faces will in time become flushed with pleasure of each other’s company, with the exertions on the dance floor, with the effects of our libations. But while the feast is still at its best, order will be called to the room – we will be asked to raise our glasses to the empty table, and we will be asked to remember:

The table is round to show our everlasting concern for those who are missing. The single setting reminds us that every one of them went to their fates alone, that every life was unique.

The tablecloth is gold symbolizing the purity of their motives when they answered the call to duty.

The single red rose, displayed in a vase, reminds us of the life of each of the missing, and their loved ones who kept the faith.

The yellow ribbon around the vase symbolizes our continued determination to remember them.

The slice of lemon reminds us of the bitterness of their fate.
The salt symbolizes the tears shed by those who loved them.
The bible represents the faith that sustained them.
The glass is inverted — they cannot share in the toast.
The chair is empty — they are not here. They are missing.

And we will remember, and we will raise our glasses to those who went before us, and who gave all that they had for us. And a part of the flush in our faces will pale as we remember that nothing worth having ever came without a cost. We will remember that many of our brothers and sisters have paid that cost in blood. We will remember that the reckoning is not over.

We many of us will settle with our families into our holiday season, our Christmas season for those who celebrate it, content in our fortune and prosperity. We will meet old friends with smiles and laughter. We will meet our members of our family with hugs. We will eat well, and exchange gifts and raise our glasses to the year passed in gratitude, and to the year to come with hope. We will sleep the sleep of the protected, secure in our homes, secure in our homeland.

But for many families, there will be an empty chair at the table this year. A place that is not filled.

WE SHOULD REMEMBER."

Many Thanks To Alfa6 For Finding Capt. Lefon's Chronicle Of "The Empty Chair."

"Träumerei"
Robert Schumann
(Click)


Never Forget The Brave Men And Women Who Gave
Their Lives To Secure Our Freedom!!






"Riamh nár dhruid ó sbairn lann!"

Genuflectimus non ad principem sed ad Principem Pacis!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

49 posted on 06/06/2014 7:06:16 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Mlichael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: ConorMacNessa

Boom


50 posted on 06/06/2014 7:08:35 PM PDT by TMSuchman (John 15;13 & Exodus 21:22-25 Pacem Bello Pastoribus Canes [shepard of peace,dogs of war])
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To: TMSuchman; Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; PROCON; ...


THE BOYS OF
POINTE DU HOC
President Ronald W. Reagan
6 June 1984
(Click)






"WE'RE HERE TO mark that day in history when the Allied armies joined in battle to reclaim this continent to liberty. For 4 long years, much of Europe had been under a terrible shadow. Free nations had fallen, Jews cried out in the camps, millions cried out for liberation. Europe was enslaved, and the world prayed for its rescue. Here in Normandy the rescue began. Here the Allies stood and fought against tyranny in a giant undertaking unparalleled in human history.

We stand on a lonely, windswept point on the northern shore of France. The air is soft, but 40 years ago at this moment, the air was dense with smoke and the cries of men, and the air was filled with the crack of rifle fire and the roar of cannon. At dawn, on the morning of the 6th of June, 1944, 225 Rangers jumped off the British landing craft and ran to the bottom of these cliffs. Their mission was one of the most difficult and daring of the invasion: to climb these sheer and desolate cliffs and take out the enemy guns. The Allies had been told that some of the mightiest of these guns were here and they would be trained on the beaches to stop the Allied advance.

The Rangers looked up and saw the enemy soldiers -- the edge of the cliffs shooting down at them with machineguns and throwing grenades. And the American Rangers began to climb. They shot rope ladders over the face of these cliffs and began to pull themselves up. When one Ranger fell, another would take his place. When one rope was cut, a Ranger would grab another and begin his climb again. They climbed, shot back, and held their footing. Soon, one by one, the Rangers pulled themselves over the top, and in seizing the firm land at the top of these cliffs, they began to seize back the continent of Europe. Two hundred and twenty-five came here. After 2 days of fighting, only 90 could still bear arms.

Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there.

These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.

Gentlemen, I look at you and I think of the words of Stephen Spender's poem. You are men who in your 'lives fought for life . . . and left the vivid air signed with your honor.'

I think I know what you may be thinking right now -- thinking ``we were just part of a bigger effort; everyone was brave that day.'' Well, everyone was. Do you remember the story of Bill Millin of the 51st Highlanders? Forty years ago today, British troops were pinned down near a bridge, waiting desperately for help. Suddenly, they heard the sound of bagpipes, and some thought they were dreaming. Well, they weren't. They looked up and saw Bill Millin with his bagpipes, leading the reinforcements and ignoring the smack of the bullets into the ground around him.

Lord Lovat was with him -- Lord Lovat of Scotland, who calmly announced when he got to the bridge, ``Sorry I'm a few minutes late,'' as if he'd been delayed by a traffic jam, when in truth he'd just come from the bloody fighting on Sword Beach, which he and his men had just taken.

There was the impossible valor of the Poles who threw themselves between the enemy and the rest of Europe as the invasion took hold, and the unsurpassed courage of the Canadians who had already seen the horrors of war on this coast. They knew what awaited them there, but they would not be deterred. And once they hit Juno Beach, they never looked back.

All of these men were part of a roll-call of honor with names that spoke of a pride as bright as the colors they bore: the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, Poland's 24th Lancers, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Screaming Eagles, the Yeomen of England's armored divisions, the forces of Free France, the Coast Guard's "Matchbox Fleet'' and you, the American Rangers.

Forty summers have passed since the battle that you fought here. You were young the day you took these cliffs; some of you were hardly more than boys, with the deepest joys of life before you. Yet, you risked everything here. Why? Why did you do it? What impelled you to put aside the instinct for self-preservation and risk your lives to take these cliffs? What inspired all the men of the armies that met here? We look at you, and somehow we know the answer. It was faith and belief; it was loyalty and love.

The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or on the next. It was the deep knowledge -- and pray God we have not lost it -- that there is a profound, moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest. You were here to liberate, not to conquer, and so you and those others did not doubt your cause. And you were right not to doubt.

You all knew that some things are worth dying for. One's country is worth dying for, and democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man. All of you loved liberty. All of you were willing to fight tyranny, and you knew the people of your countries were behind you.

The Americans who fought here that morning knew word of the invasion was spreading through the darkness back home. They fought -- or felt in their hearts, though they couldn't know in fact, that in Georgia they were filling the churches at 4 a.m., in Kansas they were kneeling on their porches and praying, and in Philadelphia they were ringing the Liberty Bell.

Something else helped the men of D-day: their rockhard belief that Providence would have a great hand in the events that would unfold here; that God was an ally in this great cause. And so, the night before the invasion, when Colonel Wolverton asked his parachute troops to kneel with him in prayer he told them: Do not bow your heads, but look up so you can see God and ask His blessing in what we're about to do. Also that night, General Matthew Ridgway on his cot, listening in the darkness for the promise God made to Joshua: "I will not fail thee nor forsake thee.''

These are the things that impelled them; these are the things that shaped the unity of the Allies.

When the war was over, there were lives to be rebuilt and governments to be returned to the people. There were nations to be reborn. Above all, there was a new peace to be assured. These were huge and daunting tasks. But the Allies summoned strength from the faith, belief, loyalty, and love of those who fell here. They rebuilt a new Europe together.

There was first a great reconciliation among those who had been enemies, all of whom had suffered so greatly. The United States did its part, creating the Marshall plan to help rebuild our allies and our former enemies. The Marshall plan led to the Atlantic alliance -- a great alliance that serves to this day as our shield for freedom, for prosperity, and for peace.

In spite of our great efforts and successes, not all that followed the end of the war was happy or planned. Some liberated countries were lost. The great sadness of this loss echoes down to our own time in the streets of Warsaw, Prague, and East Berlin. Soviet troops that came to the center of this continent did not leave when peace came. They're still there, uninvited, unwanted, unyielding, almost 40 years after the war. Because of this, allied forces still stand on this continent. Today, as 40 years ago, our armies are here for only one purpose -- to protect and defend democracy. The only territories we hold are memorials like this one and graveyards where our heroes rest.

We in America have learned bitter lessons from two World Wars: It is better to be here ready to protect the peace, than to take blind shelter across the sea, rushing to respond only after freedom is lost. We've learned that isolationism never was and never will be an acceptable response to tyrannical governments with an expansionist intent.

But we try always to be prepared for peace; prepared to deter aggression; prepared to negotiate the reduction of arms; and, yes, prepared to reach out again in the spirit of reconciliation. In truth, there is no reconciliation we would welcome more than a reconciliation with the Soviet Union, so, together, we can lessen the risks of war, now and forever.

It's fitting to remember here the great losses also suffered by the Russian people during World War II: 20 million perished, a terrible price that testifies to all the world the necessity of ending war. I tell you from my heart that we in the United States do not want war. We want to wipe from the face of the Earth the terrible weapons that man now has in his hands. And I tell you, we are ready to seize that beachhead. We look for some sign from the Soviet Union that they are willing to move forward, that they share our desire and love for peace, and that they will give up the ways of conquest. There must be a changing there that will allow us to turn our hope into action.

We will pray forever that some day that changing will come. But for now, particularly today, it is good and fitting to renew our commitment to each other, to our freedom, and to the alliance that protects it.

We are bound today by what bound us 40 years ago, the same loyalties, traditions, and beliefs. We're bound by reality. The strength of America's allies is vital to the United States, and the American security guarantee is essential to the continued freedom of Europe's democracies. We were with you then; we are with you now. Your hopes are our hopes, and your destiny is our destiny.

Here, in this place where the West held together, let us make a vow to our dead. Let us show them by our actions that we understand what they died for. Let our actions say to them the words for which Matthew Ridgway listened: "I will not fail thee nor forsake thee.''

Strengthened by their courage, heartened by their value [valor], and borne by their memory, let us continue to stand for the ideals for which they lived and died.
Thank you very much, and God bless you all.

President Ronald Reagan - June 6, 1984






"Riamh nár dhruid ó sbairn lann!"

Genuflectimus non ad principem sed ad Principem Pacis!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

51 posted on 06/06/2014 7:10:36 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Mlichael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: GodBlessUSA; mylife; AZamericonnie; Kathy in Alaska; MS.BEHAVIN; EsmeraldaA; ConorMacNessa; ...
LOVE YOU CANTEEN DJ'S!!!
Thanks for your hard work!


GodBlessUSA; mylife; AZAmericonnie; Kathy In Alaska; Ms.Behavin;EsmeraldaA; ConorMacNessa;acad1228; LibertyValance; Cindy; Starwise; 50mm; iron munro; publius;
spel_grammer_an_punct_polise;
Drumbo (and me)

Image and video hosting by TinyPic
YOU ROCK OUT LOUD!!
God bless our troops!!!

Thanks for all your hard work, Connie!

52 posted on 06/06/2014 7:16:23 PM PDT by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!l)
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To: AZamericonnie; ConorMacNessa; Kathy in Alaska; LUV W; MS.BEHAVIN; left that other site
YOUR HIT PARADE: 1944

A word from our sponsor.

Doctors for Camel Cigarettes

#18 – Stan Kenton & His Orchestra: “And Her Tears Flowed Like Wine”

Stan Kenton (1911-79) was born out of wedlock in Wichita, reared first in Colorado, then in California. He learned piano as a child, and while still a teenager toured with various bands. In 1941 he formed his own band, which developed into one of the best-known West Coast ensembles of the 1940's. He labeled his sound Progressive Jazz, and his greatest success came after the war.

Violence toward women was rather casual in the he-man world of 1944. But in this song, she got her revenge in the end.

Stan Kenton & His Orchestra (w/Anita O’Day): “And Her Tears Flowed Like Wine”

53 posted on 06/06/2014 7:17:54 PM PDT by Publius ("Who is John Galt?" by Billthedrill and Publius now available at Amazon.)
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To: LUV W

Dudess! ;-)

(((( HUGS ))))


54 posted on 06/06/2014 7:24:39 PM PDT by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (Why does every political hack think that he knows how to run my life better than I do?)
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To: 2LT Radix jr; acad1228; AirForceMom; Colonel_Flagg; AliVeritas; aomagrat; ariamne; armyavonlady; ...


USAF Concert Band~Armed Forces Medley

WE LOVE YOU ALL!!!



Proper Way To Listen To Classical Music
Video


55 posted on 06/06/2014 7:29:23 PM PDT by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!l)
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To: AZamericonnie; ConorMacNessa; Kathy in Alaska; LUV W; MS.BEHAVIN; left that other site
YOUR HIT PARADE: 1944

A word from our sponsor.

Lee Marvin for Pall Mall Cigarettes

#17 – Jo Stafford: “It Could Happen to You”

Jo Stafford (1917- 2008) was a pop music singer whose career spanned five decades. Admired for the purity of her voice, she originally underwent classical training to become an opera singer before following a career in pop music.

Born in Coalinga, California, she made her first musical appearance at age twelve. In 1938 she met the future members of The Pied Pipers and became the group’s lead singer. Tommy Dorsey hired them in 1939 to perform backup vocals for his band.

In addition to her recordings with the Pied Pipers, Stafford featured in solo performances for Dorsey. After leaving the group in 1944, she recorded a series of pop standards. Her work with the USO giving concerts for soldiers during World War II earned her the nickname “G.I. Jo”.

Jo’s second marriage was to Paul Weston. She and Paul developed a comedy routine in which they assumed the identity of an incompetent lounge act named Jonathan and Darlene Edwards. The act proved popular when the couple released an album in 1957. That disk won Stafford her only Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album and was the first commercially successful parody album. She enjoyed a brief resurgence in popularity in the late 1970’s when she recorded a cover of the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive” as Darlene Edwards. (Drumbo was not amused when I posted it a few weeks ago.)

Jo Stafford: “It Could Happen to You”

56 posted on 06/06/2014 7:31:46 PM PDT by Publius ("Who is John Galt?" by Billthedrill and Publius now available at Amazon.)
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To: Publius

What an awesome era of music!


57 posted on 06/06/2014 7:35:43 PM PDT by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!l)
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To: LUV W

They don’t make ‘em like that anymore.


58 posted on 06/06/2014 7:36:27 PM PDT by Publius ("Who is John Galt?" by Billthedrill and Publius now available at Amazon.)
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To: 2LT Radix jr; acad1228; AirForceMom; Colonel_Flagg; AliVeritas; aomagrat; ariamne; armyavonlady; ...



RANDOM TUNES ON THE PASSING SCENE.....

Andy Snitzer~Velvet

*N E W*

If you would like to support the artists
you hear in the Canteen, please go to the top of the thread
for links to their music.

Please ping any DJ to any song requests
made on the thread. Thank you!

59 posted on 06/06/2014 7:39:03 PM PDT by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!l)
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To: Publius

Indeed they don’t....and it’s a darn shame! :)


60 posted on 06/06/2014 7:39:42 PM PDT by LUV W (All my heroes wear camos! Thank you David, Michael, Chris Txradioguy, JJ, CMS, & ALL Vets, too!l)
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