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How government cleans up: Joseph Farah smacks EPA before 'biosolids' hit the fan
WorldNetDaily.com ^ | Thursday, April 4, 2002 | Joseph Farah

Posted on 04/04/2002 1:03:48 AM PST by JohnHuang2

So, you say you want the government to take a more active role in fighting pollution?

Let's discuss the way the Environmental Protection Agency has dealt with the messy problem of sludge.

Sludge is sewage. It's the wastewater dregs from homes and businesses. It's the stuff nobody wants in their backyard – for understandable reasons.

A investigation by Insight magazine found the EPA, when confronted with a growing problem of what to do with sludge, came up with a creative solution.

The agency renamed sludge. It's now called, effective in 1993, "biosolids." And, guess what? It's good for you.

I'm not kidding.

The EPA now contends that sludge is great fertilizer. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. But renaming a formerly toxic hazard does not make it so. Was EPA lying before? Or is it lying now?

EPA says biosolids should be spread on farmland with reckless abandon. You see, the government had a problem it created itself. Congress passed more laws restricting the way individuals could use their land. Congress made more laws restricting the way businesses could dispose of sludge. Congress passed more laws forbidding the dumping of sludge in the oceans. So, what was the EPA to do with the nasty byproduct of all this legislation?

It renamed it. The EPA began promoting sludge as beneficial to the environment – and away went the problem.

Once again, I point this out to you as an example of how government does not and cannot solve real-life problems. Only individuals can. As more Americans turn their eyes to Washington for solutions to everyday problems, it is critically important to understand the way policy is made by the central government.

The truth is that government doesn't know any more than you or I know about the potential harmful effects of sludge.

But, when government says it is good, individuals like you and I lose our rights to object. We forfeit our rights to sue those who spread it on properties near us. We end any accountability we would have if someone in the private sector tried to do something to which we objected.

As I mentioned in a column just last week, the worst environmental disasters the world has ever known have been created by government. Yet, activists continue to push government to become more involved in finding solutions to problems that are most often created by government.

As Alan Keyes would ask, "Does this make sense?"

In the United States, the federal government prosecutes small private landowners for making sensible improvements on their own land. They are jailed, fined, ruined – all because some bureaucrat knows better.

Government is the real threat to the environment. It always has been. It always will be. How foolish for misguided environmentalists to turn to the mega-polluters for solutions.

If government truly wants to conserve the natural state of the environment, the best idea is to get out of the way. In the medical profession, the rule is "first do no harm." That ought to be the new credo for every lawmaker and every bureaucrat. But, instead, government operates under a "hypocritic oath." It destroys the environment in the name of preserving it. It uses its power to tie the hands of private property owners who want only the best for their land, while using command-and-control tactics and master plans that wreak havoc on the natural state.

This is an example of why the founders of America deliberately tied the hands of the central government in the Constitution.

But, I guess, until the biosolids really hit the fan, we're not going to realize just how smart those guys were. We're going to continue to centralize power in the hands of a few elitists in Washington – people who think they are smarter than us and can do no wrong.




TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: enviralists; geopolitics; govwatch; landgrab; nwo
Thursday, April 4, 2002

Quote of the Day by Congressman Billybob 4/3/02

1 posted on 04/04/2002 1:03:49 AM PST by JohnHuang2
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To: JohnHuang2
Bad news for all you sugar lovers out there....It's being spread out in the cane fields in La. Treated biosludge, biosolids, or whatever you want to call it.

:)

2 posted on 04/04/2002 1:13:58 AM PST by chemicalman
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To: chemicalman
I would be very careful when dealing with the EPA. Sludge does make a very good fertilizer/land restoration additive.

It has to be properly treated, e.g. all pathogens such as coliform bacteria, worms, etc. killed. Also a problem with sludge from industrial areas such as the old so-called "rust belt" areas contains heavy metals which makes their unsuitable as fertilizer.

A curious note: A number of years ago there was a test process in the District of Columbia that combined paper trash with sludge in a process that killed all pathogens and rendered a very fine and safe fertilizer. The District was chosen as the test site because it has a major sludge problem, and also because the sludge has no heavy metals in it.

Washington, D.C. famous for its good S**T! Go figure.

Regards,

3 posted on 04/04/2002 1:43:31 AM PST by Jimmy Valentine
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To: cibco; Ol' Sox; Iowa Granny; Phil V.; MileHi; Ben Ficklin; LibertyGirl77; mfulstone; harpo11...
ping
4 posted on 04/04/2002 7:31:28 AM PST by madfly
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To: patriciaruth, shotabug, Victoria Delsoul, 1stAmendment, TigersEye, Germanflower, The Documentary
ping
5 posted on 04/04/2002 7:32:36 AM PST by madfly
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To: M1991; Scholastic; mbb bill; ctdonath2; Zoey; kristinn; Rebeckie; George Frm Br00klyn Park
ping
6 posted on 04/04/2002 7:33:47 AM PST by madfly
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To: madfly
Thanks for the ping. Here in Texas it is still being called "sewage sludge" and there are different classes. Class B sewage sludge has been treated so that it is safe enough to be used on ag land.

The legislature has mandated a new permitting process on spreading this sh!t beginning next year. The new permitting process will be lengthy and must include: source, quantity, quality, and hydrologic data on surface and ground water. The new non-point pollution regs mandate this increased consideration on run-off pollution. There are possibilities that public notices, hearings, monitoring, and reporting will be required in some cases. Permit cost will run $1-5 thousand.

7 posted on 04/04/2002 8:35:06 AM PST by Ben Ficklin
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To: Jimmy Valentine
Washington, D.C. famous for its good S**T! Go figure.

You just made my day. Thanks.

8 posted on 04/04/2002 8:48:25 AM PST by farmfriend
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To: Jimmy Valentine
....and I beleave there will be no shortage of the sludge there...
9 posted on 04/04/2002 8:57:57 AM PST by chemicalman
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To: Jimmy Valentine
Sludge does make a very good fertilizer/land restoration additive. It has to be properly treated, e.g. all pathogens such as coliform bacteria, worms, etc. killed. Also a problem with sludge from industrial areas such as the old so-called "rust belt" areas contains heavy metals which makes their unsuitable as fertilizer.

Oh, no doubt they have the technology to clean the sludge but it isn't done beacuse it is very expensive. So, they just dump the partially treated sludge with all the viruses and bacterias and ecoli and heavy metals and pesticides and poisons on the land we grow the food we eat. MMMMM good for you.

Good for the people living downwind as well...lets them really build up a resistance to all the virus and bacteriological crap to which they're exposed....if it doesn't kill 'em first.

10 posted on 04/04/2002 9:11:53 AM PST by Osinski
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To: JohnHuang2
It destroys the environment in the name of preserving it. It uses its power to tie the hands of private property owners who want only the best for their land, while using command-and-control tactics and master plans that wreak havoc on the natural state.

Boy, doesn't that just say it all.

11 posted on 04/04/2002 10:47:45 AM PST by Osinski
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To: *Enviralists;editor-surveyor
Check the Bump List folders for articles related to and descriptions of the above topic(s) or for other topics of interest.
12 posted on 04/04/2002 11:04:05 AM PST by Free the USA
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To: Free the USA; 1Old Pro; 68-69TonkinGulfYatchClub; a_federalist; abner; aculeus; alaskanfan...
Good stuff! - It's the stuff government is made of, you know.
13 posted on 04/04/2002 3:25:31 PM PST by editor-surveyor
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To: editor-surveyor
LOL! I have met government officials that are full of BS.
14 posted on 04/04/2002 3:28:41 PM PST by Libertarianize the GOP
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To: editor-surveyor
25 or 30 years ago the city of Milwaukee (sp) bagged this "stuff" and called it Milorganite and sold it as soil amendment. Golf courses loved it because it really greened up the greens. Then Organic Gardening Magazine had a hissy fit over the "potential" heavy metals in it and I din't know if it is still available. The city of Eureka CA was burying it in the sand dunes across the bay until some nut case said that was not nice. So the city bought some grazing land south of town and now they are spreading it on the grass.
15 posted on 04/04/2002 3:45:28 PM PST by tubebender
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To: JohnHuang2
not only can the value of agricultural land be enhanced with this stuff, but I think we might be able to find a way to ship it 500 miles out to sea where there is very little life out there and actually create a rising fish population in the open ocean. Remember, about 500 years ago there were much much more fish out there than there are now, something like 10 times as many or even more fish lived out there as today. It is very sad for the liberals, but we can in fact increase food population on this planet to just about any level we desire.
16 posted on 04/04/2002 3:50:12 PM PST by Red Jones
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To: Red Jones
"... Remember, about 500 years ago ..."

Gosh, no! - It plumb slipped my mind. :o)

17 posted on 04/04/2002 3:55:52 PM PST by editor-surveyor
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To: JohnHuang2
Pretty soon the Mexican government will be warning its citizens not to eat vegetables and fruit from Kali due to the use of sludge.

Sludge coming soon to a farm, pond, golf course, garden or your back yard. Sludge is good for you!

Sludge happens!

18 posted on 04/04/2002 4:48:59 PM PST by Grampa Dave
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To: chemicalman
Call it what it is. Shit.
19 posted on 04/04/2002 4:56:42 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants
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To: tubebender;editor-surveyor
Milwaukee has used its sludge for Milorganite for years.
It was used almost exclusively for turf, but more recently it has been promoted for flower and veggie gardens
It's still around; common around here.
20 posted on 04/04/2002 5:16:11 PM PST by sistergoldenhair
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To: editor-surveyor

Good stuff! - It's the stuff government is made of, you know.

Once again, I point this out to you as an example of how government does not and cannot solve real-life problems. Only individuals can. As more Americans turn their eyes to Washington for solutions to everyday problems, it is critically important to understand the way policy is made by the central government.

Here' how policy is made: Next year congress will create more than five-hundred new laws; the year after that, congress will create an additional six hundred new laws; the year after that, seven hundred new laws... and on and on it will go, has gone and presently exists.

Apparently we don't need next years laws this year but we will need those 500 new laws next year. And the year after next? Well, we don't need those six hundred laws this year. Nor will we need them next year, but we will need them the year after next. Same thing for the seven hundred new laws congress will create in 2005 -- we don't need them now but apparently we will need them in 2005.

Question: how many laws will be removed over the next three years? Will any laws be rescinded? Perhaps a dozen laws will be removed during the three year time span congress creates the expected 1800 new laws.

 understand the way policy is made by the central government.

Obviously, though not intended by the founders, the job of every member of congress is to contribute/work towards creating more and more new laws.

In the United States, the federal government prosecutes small private landowners for making sensible improvements on their own land. They are jailed, fined, ruined – all because some bureaucrat knows better.

If not that, then when a land owner improves his land the government raises his property tax. Draining the land owner of some degree of value in the process.

EPA says biosolids should be spread on farmland with reckless abandon. You see, the government had a problem it created itself. Congress passed more laws restricting the way individuals could use their land. Congress made more laws restricting the way businesses could dispose of sludge. Congress passed more laws forbidding the dumping of sludge in the oceans. So, what was the EPA to do with the nasty byproduct of all this legislation?

Though not intended by the founders, the job of every member of congress is to contribute/work towards creating problems that need not exist. And thus empower the many legislative/bureaucratic alphabet agencies with more and more power and control over individuals and private property.

The next three years will have congress creating 1,800 new laws. That's 1,800 new problems that need not exist.

Note: The "1,800 new laws" number is speculative and probably quite conservative. During Clinton's eight years in the oval office 25,000 new laws and regulations were created.

The truth is that government doesn't know any more than you or I know about the potential harmful effects of sludge.

The truth is that government with all it's politicians and bureaucrats doesn't know any more than the market knows about the potential harmful effects of any object, substance or action. Government often knows considerably less.

Government is the real threat to the environment. It always has been. It always will be. How foolish for misguided environmentalists to turn to the mega-polluters for solutions.

Government is the real threat to the people's prosperity. It always has been. It always will be. How foolish for misguided patriots to turn to the mega-problem creators for solutions.

Not Going to Take It Anymore

21 posted on 04/04/2002 5:24:57 PM PST by Zon
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To: madfly; JohnHuang2
My brother bought some and spread it on his lawn before selling the house. Really made the grass grow but the smell was very disturbing. I didn't want to even walk on the lawn for a month. :( LOL But I would rather have them market it as Bio Solids than Nutritious Solids!
22 posted on 04/04/2002 5:31:32 PM PST by Libertina
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To: editor-surveyor
Why don't we put it in bombs, drop them on Iraq, and see what grows?
23 posted on 04/04/2002 5:33:45 PM PST by Eustace
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To: madfly
Government does not and cannot solve real-life problems. Only individuals can. As more Americans turn their eyes to Washington for solutions to everyday problems, it is critically important to understand the way policy is made by the central government.

Bump.

24 posted on 04/04/2002 5:49:25 PM PST by Victoria Delsoul
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To: editor-surveyor
Thanks for the flag.
25 posted on 04/04/2002 5:50:24 PM PST by Victoria Delsoul
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To: editor-surveyor
bump
26 posted on 04/04/2002 9:34:25 PM PST by mafree
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To: editor-surveyor
BTTT!!!!!
27 posted on 04/05/2002 2:20:45 AM PST by E.G.C.
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To: editor-surveyor
More info
28 posted on 04/05/2002 4:11:04 AM PST by RGSpincich
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To: Zon; Carry_Okie; "NWO"; enviralists; Geopolitics; Gov_Watch; Black Jade; M1991; cdwright...
And thus empower the many legislative/bureaucratic alphabet agencies with more and more power and control over individuals and private property.
Z, And, create the "need" for more "enforcers" and associated equipment, and MORE private sector taxpayer money to pay godgov's bills. Nice scam run by the best politicians money can buy. Peace and love, George.
29 posted on 04/05/2002 5:11:01 AM PST by George Frm Br00klyn Park
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To: JohnHuang2
The EPA now contends that sludge is great fertilizer. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. But renaming a formerly toxic hazard does not make it so.

Joe Farah has spun himself clean around. The fact is that feces do make good fertilizer. Third world subsistence farmers have known that for tens of thousands of years. Nobody in the government is requiring that anybody throw crap all over their land; it seems to me that this rule change reflects the government relaxing restrictions and permitting what people have done throughout the ages. But wait! Here's Joe Farah screaming, "No, no! This stuff is toxic; you were right before! Save me, O government, SAVE ME!"

It wonders me.

30 posted on 04/05/2002 7:17:52 AM PST by Physicist
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To: editor-surveyor
Related: "OPEN SPACE" TAXES. Has your town taxed you yet to "preserve" open space-
31 posted on 04/05/2002 9:48:04 AM PST by 1Old Pro
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To: JohnHuang2
"The EPA now contends that sludge is great fertilizer. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. But renaming a formerly toxic hazard does not make it so."

Farrah should do some homework before he writes these screeds. It's not 'toxic', the EPA didn't 'rename it' and it has been around far longer than the EPA has.

For the last 75 years, courtesy of the ‘people of Milwaukee’, this has been the most popular fertilizer in the nation and has kept lawns and golf courses green and growing.

. Waste plant sludge is nothing new as any serious home gardener knows. There is nothing wrong in using treated ‘bio-solids’.

32 posted on 04/05/2002 10:00:56 AM PST by Ditto
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To: editor-surveyor
Thanks for the ping.

I suspect that the power to change the name of a substance is similar to the power to change the definition of a word. That power needs to be closely inspected and never secret, allowed to the PC crowd, or envirowackos, as they will ALWAYS missuse it.

33 posted on 04/05/2002 1:43:02 PM PST by Navy Patriot
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To: editor-surveyor
The Catepillar intends for words to mean what he intends them to mean. He intended it all along.
34 posted on 04/06/2002 10:25:56 PM PST by philman_36
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