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Is the United States Broken?
FreeRepublic ^ | 4/04/2002 | B. A. Conservative

Posted on 04/04/2002 10:13:48 AM PST by B. A. Conservative

There have been 26 people who responded to the initial post in this series entitled, "Not Goint to Take It Anymore". I have tried to infer their thinking regarding the underlying premise of the series: the United States as defined under our Constitution has ceased to exist. There are at least two separate population groups living within the geographical confines of the United States. The two groups have diametrically opposing views of government. There is some over-lapping of the geographic areas occupied by the two groups, but surprisingly the over-lap is less than most imagine. This makes a geo-political division between the groups feasible and perhaps desireable.

Of the 26 replies, there was only one who felt that the idea that the United States is broken was treachery or treasonous. There were four who plan to monitor these threads and who seemed undecided. Most respondents agree that the United States is in fact broken.

I am posting the first question now as its own thread to provide additional opportunities to recruit additional Freepers to participate in the discussion and for each participant to have a venue to clearly state their own opinions.

Is the United States broken?


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism
KEYWORDS: freedom; liberty; tyranny
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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It would seem logical to me to begin a debate on whether the United States is broken by reviewing our Founding Documents and how they pertain to our lives after two hundred years. This is perhaps the best Review of the Constitution that I have ever encountered.

Please don't be bashful and please recruit your Freeping buddies to participate. I am suggesting that this site exists because almost all of us have realized the truth, even though most of us have been unwilling to admit it to others and in particularly, many of us have been unwilling to admit the truth to ourselves. Recognition of an unpleasant truth make it incumbent upon us to deal with it or accept it. For some, this could amount to a revelation to ourselves that we really don't love freedom as much as we would pretend and are thus not the patriots we thought ourselves to be. For others, this could be a vital reawakening and a call to respond.

When this series is finished, I hope we all know in our own minds where we stand. From that knowledge, we may be able to synthesize a reasonable and rational plan to recover what we have lost.

1 posted on 04/04/2002 10:13:48 AM PST by B. A. Conservative
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To: steve50; JohnGalt; fporretto; George Frm Br00klyn Park; tacticalogic; VoodooEconomist; Wolfe...
My appologies to WhiteGuy, he is respondent #27. And his reply is worth noting by all.
2 posted on 04/04/2002 10:19:06 AM PST by B. A. Conservative
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To: B. A. Conservative
Thanks BA, now if only my age were 27........
3 posted on 04/04/2002 10:23:11 AM PST by WhiteGuy
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To: B. A. Conservative
Is the United States Broken?

Where do we begin? I think it might be more accurate to answer
"No, but the government of the US is....."

Then again, if the vast majority of everyone here, wants a
socialist EU clone, perhaps the answer truly is "Yes"

4 posted on 04/04/2002 10:38:13 AM PST by WhiteGuy
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To: B. A. Conservative
WG's response has been read and noted.

As far as the discussion on the Constitution goes, I'll be happy to participate as I can, and hope I can contribute something worthwhile.

One thing I do think seems to be a problem is the term "regulate". It's commonly understood meaning in the 18th century has been lost, and replacing it with the more modern definition within the context of the Constitution has resulted in serious misunderstanding of what the responsibilities and authority of the federal government are - IMHO.

5 posted on 04/04/2002 10:39:56 AM PST by tacticalogic
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To: B. A. Conservative
The Constitution was written and practical for a land where most of the people lived and died within a few miles, and most business was done within a community. As we entered the industrial age, huge capital investments (factories) that required cheap labor necessitated the importation of immigrants. Meanwhile, the landed aristocracy of the South determined that they did not want to link themselves to the fates of the urban political machines brewing in the Northern metropolises.

A war was fought.

The Constitution was not created to deal with the political realities of the Industrial Age. After anti-trust laws broke the back of the Rugged Individual, 'Progressives' launched a host of national crusades (woman's sufferage, alcohol, cocaine, and opium prohibition...) unthinkable in rational government. Workers exploited the capitalists with the sit-down strike and extorted demands from the capitalists.

War was now exported to build the empire (Spanish-American, The Boxer Rebellion, World War One, Philippines Insurrection...)

We are still living with a failed Industrial Era government. Factories are now closing (as who wants the headaches?) in favor of mobile information business.

The Constitution was based on regional conflicts to promote a balance of power, however, with increased freedom of movement, the lines are drawn around cities and rural communities eager to receive fleeing urban capitalists.

A new Information Elite cares not for nationalism but, in this age, still has tight bonds to the land of our fathers. Much like the generation who fathered the forefathers were still attached to Mother England and would never think of 'rebelling.'

However, since the information elite can go to any port, in any country, and so long as he has his laptop and cell phone, he can conduct business and provide for his family. Thus, most of us will choose discretion as the better part of valor and opt to move rather than bleed for our farms. This is the metaphoric seach for Galt's Gulch we talked about in the last thread.

What will become of the nation-state that we knew? Well, that is why we enjoy politics. The have-nots will continue to demand more from that haves and arcane references to Constitutional interpretations will not stop what amounts to a 73%-93% tax on the amount of wealth we earn in a lifetime (compound interest on $5000 paid each tax year is ~$1.5 million in lifetime earnings- thus the opportunity cost must be considered.)

6 posted on 04/04/2002 10:41:22 AM PST by JohnGalt
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To: B. A. Conservative
the United States as defined under our Constitution has ceased to exist.

Nonsense!!!

Though things may look a bit bleak, you must have confidence in the Fighting Tigers of the GOP.



I know I do... ;o)
7 posted on 04/04/2002 10:42:05 AM PST by wheezer
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: B. A. Conservative
bump for this evening but the short answer for now. Yes, and irreparable I'm afraid. The only way to put the US back to the point it should be is to take the voting power out of the hands of most the people. Before I'm flamed about this consider that the most powerful lawmaking group in the country is controlled by special interest groups and mindless sheep who vote for their Senators. The original Constitution had a buffer between the Senate and the people, that of the state legislatures. The Founders realized the power of the Senate and that the average citizen of the states would not be able to make a decision concerning the entire country wisely and without feeling.

Alas but the 17th Amendment overturned that and we have what we have now. A group of men that appeal to the masses and whoever has the most money in their pockets

9 posted on 04/04/2002 10:56:18 AM PST by billbears
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To: B. A. Conservative
No. The USA is still in perfect working condition.
10 posted on 04/04/2002 11:08:28 AM PST by Huck
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To: B. A. Conservative
We have certainly "evolved", in terms of what this country was intended to be, and what it is currently is.

This may be considered simplistic, but in my view, the most significant factor is the ignorance of the Declaration of Independence and its reference to the Creator, as the grantor of rights.

The government is currently the grantor of rights, and rights are granted in a "right du jour" sort of way. This has allowed the origination of "rights", that aren't consistent with any objective moral standard.

Quite often, the only basis for morality, is political expedience, rather than a prescribed objective moral code. In this light, abortion "rights" [for ex.] are manufactured according to the best rationalization we can muster, regardless of how devoid of reason, since the attainment of the right is the [political] objective, and not the preservation or attainment of an objective moral state of affairs.

11 posted on 04/04/2002 11:22:34 AM PST by bzrd
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To: Huck
No. The USA is still in perfect working condition.

Now back to reality and our regularly scheduled programming.

---max

12 posted on 04/04/2002 11:27:29 AM PST by max61
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To: wheezer
You're killing me!!!

Thats the funniest pic I seen in a long time.

13 posted on 04/04/2002 11:35:13 AM PST by WhiteGuy
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To: max61
The reality being that the USA is in perfect working condition. We still have elections. We still have a republican system which is part national, part federal. We still have the Constitution, which can still be amended by the original process. We the people still have all the blessings of liberty at our disposal. That we don't use them in the most sensible way is nothing new. Not by a long shot. But no one ever promised a rose garden. THAT'S reality. For those who can't handle reality, you can always fantasize about partitioning the US into smaller countries where everyone agrees on everything. LOL.
14 posted on 04/04/2002 11:37:33 AM PST by Huck
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To: WhiteGuy
You're killing me!!!

Thats the funniest pic I've seen in a long time.

sorry for my poor typing

15 posted on 04/04/2002 11:38:12 AM PST by WhiteGuy
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To: JohnGalt
Allow this comment on your succinct essay: back in the 1830's John C. Calhoun pointed out that universal suffrage would result in what we see today, that is expropriation of a minority by the 50% plus one majority. People always, as a group, want more of what they want, and a majority wants other people's money.

This expropriation is inevitable without property qualifications for voting, which is why the founding generation did so restrict the suffrage. Poll taxes were usefull for this also. To return to workable politics is impossible without crisis. Machievelli and Plato said that Democracy always fails after expropriating the rich. A tyrant is voted in to accomplish this, as was Hitler.

16 posted on 04/04/2002 11:45:18 AM PST by Iris7
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To: B. A. Conservative
YES the U.S. is "broken" in the sense that it does not function anywhere near the Founding Fathers' intent. Their attempts to provide "checks and balances" was valiant, but fundamentally flawed. They did the best they could at the time, but the slavery compromise, followed by Marbury vs. Madison, the National Bank, LA purchase, etc., laid the foundation for an overly socialist, tyrannical, unaccountable central government that quickly moved on to become an imperial power. What a shame.
17 posted on 04/04/2002 11:47:31 AM PST by muleboy
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To: B. A. Conservative
It's WAY broken. IMO, past the point of no return. Primarily because:

a) the Biblical morality is was built on is gone

b) the people have become so dumbed down that they're clueless

18 posted on 04/04/2002 11:53:37 AM PST by Jefferson Adams
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To: B. A. Conservative
Was there ever a point in American history where government institutions actually functioned in the manner intended by the Founders? I don't believe there ever was a time. Governments are implemented by humans. Mankind is driven by ambition and corrupted by power. Any allusion that this was a republic under a limited federal government, with checks and balances, and most functions reserved for the states was dashed forever on the fields of Virginia when Robert E. Lee surrendered to U.S. Grant.
19 posted on 04/04/2002 11:55:22 AM PST by Don'tMessWithTexas
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To: Iris7
That is essentially libertarian political theory in a nutshell, however, while I agree with it on some level, it does not account for other tyrannies outside the tyranny of the majority.

A massive factory in the late 19th Century and well into the 1930s was a huge capital investment. Since the investment could not be moved, there was 'tyranny of place' that is not accounted for in libertarian thought of Calhoun's time. However, the Information Age will solve that.

20 posted on 04/04/2002 11:56:53 AM PST by JohnGalt
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Comment #21 Removed by Moderator

To: B. A. Conservative
Is the United States broken?

This should read "ARE the United States Broken". This is not a semantic exercise. It represents the erosion of state's powers and the growth of leviathan.

Regards

J.R.

22 posted on 04/04/2002 12:18:26 PM PST by NMC EXP
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To: wheezer
Though things may look a bit bleak, you must have confidence in the Fighting Tigers of the GOP.

I'd sooner have confidence in the Flying Tiger Line. They deliver, at least.

For the GOP and the Damnocrats today, flying pussycats is probably more appropriate. (You realise, don't you, that "pussycats" is the only way I can say what I'd like to say on a real or alleged family news forum.

Bottom line: The United States wasn't broken, until the usual gang of idiots tried to fix it anyway. And that began a rather long time ago. I'm not entirely sure of a pinpoint date, but I think it's reasonable to presume that when it did began, they were still calling baseball "base" and not yet developing it all the way forth from its root in rounders...
23 posted on 04/04/2002 12:30:06 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: B. A. Conservative
No. If we don't let the rest of the socialist world drag us down, this country is headed for greatness. Were ready to bust loose, the likes of which has never been seen.

To the rest of the world ,GET THE HE!! OUT OF OUR WAY!

24 posted on 04/04/2002 12:40:52 PM PST by smithson
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To: smithson
If we don't let the rest of the socialist world drag us down, this country is headed for greatness.

First, we need to offload our own socialist occupiers ...
25 posted on 04/04/2002 1:11:26 PM PST by BluesDuke
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To: BluesDuke
"First we need to offload our own socialists occupier's ."

Agreed.

26 posted on 04/04/2002 1:17:41 PM PST by smithson
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To: billbears
Well said, billbears.
27 posted on 04/04/2002 1:23:15 PM PST by CWRWinger
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To: B. A. Conservative
"It would seem logical to me to begin a debate on whether the United States is broken..."

If one is driving their automatic transmissioned car down the road and the trans stops pulling, and the vehicle slows to a stop and won't go forward, and ATF starts spilling out on the pavement; One does not say, "It seems logicical to begin a debate on whether this car is broken."

28 posted on 04/04/2002 1:34:38 PM PST by CWRWinger
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To: CWRWinger
"...[agents of the] ATF starts spilling out on the pavement..."

I like the way this story is going! LOL!

29 posted on 04/04/2002 2:44:01 PM PST by headsonpikes
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To: Huck
Your attitude scares me the most.

Waco is the defining cultural event of my life, couple with the fact that not only were the people responsible not held accountable to the law, but the people relected the President in 1996.

30 posted on 04/04/2002 2:44:46 PM PST by JohnGalt
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To: BluesDuke
I'm not entirely sure of a pinpoint date,

I believe circa 1937 is about the time they started seriously screwing with things that should have been left well enough alone.

31 posted on 04/04/2002 2:51:38 PM PST by tacticalogic
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To: JohnGalt
Your attitude scares me the most. Waco is the defining cultural event of my life, couple with the fact that not only were the people responsible not held accountable to the law, but the people relected the President in 1996.

Neither Waco nor Bill Clinton's reelection was caused by any "broken" aspect of our constitutional system, unless you consider the people to be broken. It's an argument not without its merits. The system is reasonably intact. Oh sure, it could stand some serious improvement in its operation, and of course some laws are better than others, and certain judicial precedents are not exactly desirable. But my point remains: we had at our disposal several means of dealing with Waco and the aftermath of Waco. America freely chose. And likewise we have at our disposal all the power necessary to undo any bad precedent, punish any bad public officer, and advance any set of ideas we choose. I'd like to know why saying so scares you.

32 posted on 04/04/2002 3:16:33 PM PST by Huck
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To: B. A. Conservative
Oops, I posted this on your original thread, so I will repost and add a little.

Not sure how I found this thread, but I am glad I did since there seems to be some real clarity of thought here. Sadly, my verbal skills are average compared to my analytical skills, and I avoided reading books until I got out of college. With that disclaimer out of the way, I think that the sad truth is that the politicians we rag on so much are mostly a mirror image of the people they represent. I know it sounds trite, but we need to do a real thorough self inspection and fix ourselves first. In a kind of ironic, and wasteful way, 9/11 has served as a partial catalyst for this in my opinion so there may be some positive changes in the near future. As far as what we can do politically, I am more pessimistic. Sometimes I think that this is just the natural cycle of all political systems, and we are powerless to stop it. One thing I do know is that this republic was turned into a democracy in 1913 when the 17th Amendment was ratified, and it didn't take too long for Ben Franklin's warning to come to fruition. Congress was pretty busy that year, they also ratified the income tax amendment.

Someone mentioned something about a government being its people or at least a manifestation of it or something like that. I couldn't agree more. Justice is for the just, freedom for the free, there will never be a democracy in Afghanistan. This is why I think uncontrolled immigration is suicidal, we will certainly choke to death at this high rate. As JohnGault rightly points out, the demand is produced by industry, which is ironically being shipped overseas by way of something akin to the NIMBY argument. Difficult to make sense of that pile of spaghetti and where it is going. A government is its people and some of the stuff I see more and more people do these days makes me nervous. The number of cars parked with their hazzard lights on in front of the grocery store at anytime, is a very visible sign of a sick people, but maybe I am overreacting.

33 posted on 04/04/2002 3:22:30 PM PST by sixmil
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To: headsonpikes
Yes, that scenario would be nice, LOL.
34 posted on 04/04/2002 3:31:56 PM PST by CWRWinger
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To: NMC EXP
This should read "ARE the United States Broken". This is not a semantic exercise. It represents the erosion of state's powers and the growth of leviathan.
Both of those thoughts have gone through my mind many times, but I never drew the link. Pretty insightful. How about the people who misuse the words democracy and republic? Do they deserve either?

35 posted on 04/04/2002 3:36:53 PM PST by sixmil
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To: sixtycyclehum
See here for my reply
36 posted on 04/04/2002 3:52:51 PM PST by Mikey
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To: sixtycyclehum
See here for my reply, post # 46
37 posted on 04/04/2002 3:53:26 PM PST by Mikey
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To: Iris7
Allow this comment on your succinct essay: back in the 1830's John C. Calhoun pointed out that universal suffrage would result in what we see today, that is expropriation of a minority by the 50% plus one majority. People always, as a group, want more of what they want, and a majority wants other people's money.

I suppose that the 19th Amendment was the biggest step toward "universal suffrage." How do you feel about that one?

38 posted on 04/04/2002 3:58:34 PM PST by humbletheFiend
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To: Huck
The people are broken and it's too late to change anything by design; only a true cataclysm or act of God is going to fix it now.
39 posted on 04/04/2002 4:20:45 PM PST by Max McGarrity
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To: NMC EXP
Good point, but it may be lost on some.

"The war was a conflict over grammar- whether the proper grammar was 'the united States are' or 'The United States is'."

Basil Gildersleeve

40 posted on 04/04/2002 5:12:58 PM PST by Twodees
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To: NMC EXP
I feel shamed that I did not catch that myself. Thank you for the correction
41 posted on 04/04/2002 6:09:05 PM PST by billbears
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Comment #42 Removed by Moderator

To: sixmil
Congress was pretty busy that year, they also ratified the income tax amendment.

They also passed the Federal Reserve Act.

foreverfree

43 posted on 04/04/2002 6:17:55 PM PST by foreverfree
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To: Max McGarrity
The people are broken

I don't think so. I think "The People" is broken, and "the people" are being kept too distracted to notice. But they're catching on.

44 posted on 04/04/2002 6:49:50 PM PST by tacticalogic
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To: B. A. Conservative
With all respect, I think there's a flaw in your premise. There are not two groups in the U.S. There are multiple factions, although, yes, I do think the U.S. is broken.

On Free Republic, several factions exist, and represent larger bodies. Conservative really doesn't mean anything anymore, so I'll break it down a little further. There are social conservatives, who believe the government should enforce certain moral codes, or at least allow cities and states to do so. There are fiscal conservatives, who don't believe the government should "legislate morality", but don't want vast expenditures of money. There are several flavors of Libertarian, but most believe the government should, for the most part, not exist, except to provide for military protection and to provide some critical infrastructure, such as roads, etc. Then, there are country club Republicans, who have no problem with high taxes, so long as most government expenditures are in the form of subsidies to their particular industry.

Many of these groups overlap with groups from the DU, GreenPeace, NAMBLA, etc, who don't usually post on Free Republic. These groups each have their own flavor from total socialism in one area to total anarchy in others.

For the most part, though, the country is broken because the government does not exist as it was designed. Congress has become Santa Claus, engaging in a bidding war for the votes of their various constituants. They no longer even consider whether something is Constitutional or not, since they are too busy fighting over whether the peanut farmers in Georgia or the chicpea growers in Louisiana will get the biggest subsidy from the current farm bill, since each of the sitting senators is vulnerable, and must buy votes for the next election.

Into this void of leadership steps the Supreme Court, which has assumed most of the legislative duties in the country by declaring that whatever pops into their heads when the lithium wears off is what the Constitution means. The role of the White House varies, depending upon the occupant, but for the most part, the President serves as a face for the government, and may veer the country slightly in one direction or another. Meanwhile, countless Federal bureaucracies create regulations which carry the weight of law, but are not subject to voter approval. These, along with strings tied to Federal funds, and activism in the court system, have removed the last of the states rights. The Internal Revenue Service claims the right to see every one of our banking records, rendering the right to be secure in our persons and properties totally meaningless.

Of course, most people don't really care, because they're too busy trying to get their piece of the public pie, or are involved in rampant hedonism. When was the last time there was a national college or pro sports championship that didn't cause a riot in the home city of the winner? I still remember a young lady calling into a talk show, livid because Al Gore lost, and all George Bush wanted to do was to take away her abortion, her vibrator, and her right to an orgasm, and she thought she was making a serious point.

The US government is broken, but we have the government we deserve, as do most people.

45 posted on 04/04/2002 7:17:07 PM PST by Richard Kimball
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To: B. A. Conservative
You can avoid redistributionist policies if you restrict the suffrage and keep the mass of society poor, though such a policy would court revolution. Certainly the world is full of countries where such programs don't exist, because there are no elections, or only a restricted suffrage, and because it's clear that there isn't enough to go around. Once you create enough of a surplus, and the means of extracting it, there will be people who will try to take it. We can restrict or limit or redirect that redistributionist impulse, but it's folly to expect that there won't be some people who think that way and want to do something about it or that they won't get their way sometimes.

The more I learn, the more I disagree with Joe Sobran.

First, for assuming that state sovereignty would necessarily mean greater individual freedom than federal supremacy. The unlimited sovereignty of the state in Europe did not make individuals freer or the EU make them less freer. One can argue which way is better, but clearly one can't assume that more extended federal governments are always a greater threat than smaller or local ones. State governments have shown themselves to be fully as oppressive as the federal government.

Second, for asserting that the Founders wanted to restrict the powers of the federal government as drastically as he claims. They'd just lived through the days of the Articles of Confederation and the Federalists, as opposed to the Anti-Federalists opposed the weakness of the Federal government under the Articles. Many of the things the federal government does now are unwise and some may be unconstitutional, but an act of the federal government is not unconstitutional simply because it isn't explicitly provided for in the Constition. They could have written a Constitution that much more decisively restricted the powers of the federal government by using the word "expressly", but they chose not to do so.

That's not to say that federal power is better than state power or that everything the federal government does is right, wise or constitutional, but Joe is peddling stuff that's been called into question virtually since the beginning of the Republic and calling it gospel. It's worth reflecting that the Supreme Court was still overturning federal legislation that interfered in the internal commerce of a state as recently as the 1930s, so there is something to build on if one wants to argue some federal agencies unconstitutional, but the arguments Joe makes have been dead-letters since Jefferson exercised implied powers to buy Louisiana and Hamilton and later Madison used them to charter national banks.

One thing to consider is that our problems may not involve usurpations and tyrannies, but trying to act wisely and responsibly. The answer may not be secession or litigation but persuasion.

46 posted on 04/04/2002 8:46:03 PM PST by x
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To: Huck
We elect folks who pass laws that are never enforced, witness the 1996 Welfare and Farm Reform bills. That is not a republic that is a superficial republic. Words have meaning, A = A.
47 posted on 04/05/2002 4:37:27 AM PST by JohnGalt
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To: B. A. Conservative
broken?.....that word doesn't begin to discribe it.....
48 posted on 04/05/2002 4:42:25 AM PST by is_is
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To: B. A. Conservative
Is the United States broken?

If we believe it is, it's we who've been broken. Our country is holding out against a world socialist insurgence that spends every waking moment demonizing capitalism, the rule of law and our republic. With so much energy being exhorted against us, we can not stand unless we trust in our hearts, that what we've built on the foundation laid down by our forefathers, is something good and worth fighting for. Just because the socialists have their foot in our door doesn't mean it is coming off the hinges. It is our job, our generation's turn, to do the necessary maintenence, to pitch in to fix the leaks, replace some siding, pull some weeds and fertilize the new plants in our garden. We've just had our wake-up call and if that siren warning of our neglect is not heeded, we will have failed at our turn at the helm and we will have denined our childrn the honor and privledge of taking their turn at the wheel.

49 posted on 04/05/2002 4:56:30 AM PST by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: B. A. Conservative
The United States of America in either the singular or collective sense of the noun is/are broken. The social contract is rent on many many lines. The Bill of Rights has becoming effectively meaningless. The First Amendment is subject to restrictions regarding Freedom of political speech. Freedom of the free exercise of religion, and the right to peaceably assemble. The Second Amendment to the Constitution is ignored. The Fourth Amendment is pretty much valueless now and the Fifth Amendment is certainly gone given the civil forfeiture laws, the IRS reporting requirements. The sixth is ignored when it comes to prosections being done in the state and district where the "crime" was committed and the right to trial by jury is there so that juries may not enforce an unjust law so it is now gone. The seventh is considered null and void. Try demanding a jury trial in a matter of say fifty dollars in a Federal court. As to the right of a jury to determine facts that has long since been pretty much put aside. Tyhe eight amendment is no longer operative if one is a definite target of the government. I could cite examples but when it comes to these guarantees they only apply to protected classes not to ordinary citizens.

The ninth Ammendment has been interpreted by the Supreme Court to include the Penumbra of a right to abortion. Yet can any other right enforced by the courts be found under this Amendment?

The Tenth Amendment is null and void according to Robert Bork. The states have no Rights anymore. The years of the 55 mph speed limit are testimony to that. The Brady Law is testement to that. Nor are the people who are citizens of the USA guaranteed any rights under this Amendment.

I note the presence of this Amendment as a limit to Federal power. Those who say that the Federal Government can govern areas other than those deleagted powers specifically and expressly granted to the Federal Government should read this amendment and reread it.

Yes, our system as defined is broken and we as a nation will pay a terible price for ignoring our most fundamental law. The constitution in Germany in the `1930's and 1940's contained many guarantees of liberty but it was ignored. Likewise the Soviet Constitution contained numerous guartees of individual liberty that were never enforced. When the Constitution means whatever whover holds the power says it means then the only law is superior force. The end result of such a situation is almost always carnage on a massive scale.

Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown

50 posted on 04/05/2002 5:54:54 AM PST by harpseal
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