Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

To: All
Caribbean leaders ignore Cuba's abuses*** One blunt-speaking moderator, Leslie Pierre, told me that he opposes the U.S. embargo. But as the editor and publisher of The Grenadian Voice, Pierre has called on Caribbean leaders to condemn Cuba's abuses -- to no avail.

In Pierre's view, Caribbean leaders who fail to condemn evil in their own neighborhood become ''collaborators, in effect,'' with Castro.

''When Castro can do a thing like that and not have anybody come down on him, he can be encouraged to even greater excesses,'' Pierre said. ``We must tell our friends when they are good and we must tell them when they are wrong.''

''Sometimes, there's a respect for Cuba in this part of the world because it stands up against the United States,'' Joel Simon, the acting director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, told me. ``But that's no excuse.''

Days before the UNESCO-sponsored conference, members of the United Nations voted Cuba back onto its human-rights committee, giving a perverse legitimacy to the region's hypocrisy on Cuba. The failure to condemn Castro ultimately reflects an unhealthy characteristic in many developing countries: political leaders and well-connected ''elites'' who define themselves not by what they support -- but by what they oppose.

In Jamaica, many university-educated elites promote a 1970s leftist worldview and pontificate endlessly about the evils supposedly perpetrated by U.S. foreign policy. Yet they often seem loath to discuss the grim day-to-day realities of ordinary Jamaicans: an unacceptably high level of extra-judicial police killings, rampant crime and a lack of decent jobs and public services.

After the Sept. 11 terror attacks, President Bush took the moral high road, declaring that the world's leaders must decide whether they are with the terrorists or against them, and not equivocate on the issue.

Caribbean leaders and intellectuals would do well to consider that advice -- for the sake of Raúl Rivero and other pro-democracy activists and journalists rotting in Cuba's jails. ***

564 posted on 06/20/2003 2:28:08 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 563 | View Replies ]


To: All
"Castro is a murder." Tearful relatives of Cuban dissidents call for sanctions against Castro*** MIAMI (AFP) - Tearful relatives of jailed Cuban dissidents issued an emotional plea for tough sanctions against President Fidel Castro's communist government and said they were heading to Europe to press their case. Larry Klayman, the head of Judicial Watch, the conservative legal watchdog group organizing the trip, called outright for the US military to oust Castro, saying the Cuban leader was "more of a threat than Saddam Hussein." Klayman and the exiled Cubans spoke at a news conference in Miami to outline details of a nine-country tour next week aimed at pressing European countries to impose economic sanctions against Cuba.

"No dictatorship can exist without external support but no dictatorship can be brought down either without external support," said Alina Fernandez, an exiled daughter of Castro, who will lead the trip. "We are asking the world to help us with the situation in Cuba," said Blanca Gonzalez, whose journalist son, Normando Gonzalez, was recently sentenced to 25 years in a Cuban prison. Tears streaming down her cheeks another dissident's relative said she would tell European leaders that "Fidel Castro is a murderer." "Until now, they have been blind and deaf to the tragedy in Cuba," said Isabel Roque, her voice choked with emotion.

Klayman also called for the ouster of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. "Chavez is a terrorist, removing him in any particular way would probably be beneficial," he said. ***

565 posted on 06/20/2003 11:48:08 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 564 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson